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Home schooling and I'm clueless. Updated

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My fears with my son were confirmed well before he even entered school. While I was working and he was in daycare. The center was all about school readiness. I was constantly being called in for "developmental delays" in his play. He wouldn't "play" cooking. Didn't like to "play" house. He didn't  "play talk" on the phone. He didn't even play with these types of toys or show interest in them. By the time he was in VPK (age 4) he was doing well with certain aspects, but was falling significantly behind in the writing and reading. He flat out refused to do his Kindergarten readiness exam at the age 5. I went around and around with the school board. They said I had "No logical reason" to withhold him from Kindergarten. My only option was home school or public school. I was a single working mom. What was I to do?  I didn't think he was ready at all. His birthday is May 27th. School here starts the very first week of August. I just didn't feel he was ready.

He nearly failed Kindergarten. They passed him because his Math abilities are extraordinary. He was working in 2nd grade math. Now in first grade his favorite thing is the times tables, and I'm not talking 2x2 he's into his 7s and 8s now. He likes fractions and he thinks gemometry is cool. His reading and writing are dragging him down. He's just now testing into first grade level and it's almost the end of the year. He hates school. He's begging me to take him out. They keep him from recess so he can have extra time on his classwork. My curious and eager to learn child is quickly shutting down on me. They've been testing him for two years to develop and I.E.P. plan for him. 

Now that I'm married I'm able to be a SAHM. But I'm in college. There's a place here called O2BKids. that he's in. He loves it. He does dance, gymnastics, karate, and his favorite thing is the rock wall that he can climb. They've got a small home school program where the kids meet once a week. They have science classes and art classes. Really big on the hands on things. And during the summer camp program they take field trips that include Swimming, Parks, Skating, Bowling, Movies, Rock Climbing, Zoo, Springs, and other such things. They also have O2B Expeditions, an optional part of Camp O2B to theme parks like Disney’s Animal Kingdom, Wild Adventures, and Wild Waters. Which we did last year and he got to go to Sea World for an "Educational Tour" and really got to get hands on. Which is what now has him raving about being a Marine Biologist. He's old enough to be on the campus by him self and during the summer that's no problem there's lot of kids there all the time. However during the school year, until the after school program starts there's really no kids his age there. It's mostly for the little kids 0-5 and the Mommy & Me groups. So I don't know how well it would work out me sending him there during the hours of my classes.




I'd love to home school him, and I've looked and looked and looked online. I don't know any home school moms around here. And the moms I do know approach the idea of home schooling like it's something from the Middle Ages.

Most of the programs I am finding are religion linked. Not a route I am wanting to take. We're Buddhists.

I don't even know if I can home school while being a full time student. Advice. Resources. Anything would be really appreciated.



---UPDATE---

Thank you all so much.

Thanks to the suggestion of using a secular school that would be able to incorporate our religious beliefs (which I never even thought was possible since, I'll be honest, I was under the close minded assumption that private schools--including private home school programs--meant some sect of Christian teachings.) we found that Global Village School really fitted what my husband and I are considering. I've already called them and spoke to their consultant, also they're sending me more information in a packet. 

My next step is transferring to the O2B Kids there and networking with local moms once we move and get settled into our new city, which frankly has me terrified. 

Mama Ajax @ Blogger

Just a little bit my life experiences.

by on Apr. 23, 2013 at 12:19 AM
Replies (11-19):
MamaAjax
by on Apr. 23, 2013 at 3:18 PM


That's my biggest issue right now is we're moving about an hour and half further south for my husbands college. He's trying for the Medical program and UF really is the best in the state for it. I have no friends or family there. My husband has already moved down there and My son and I are moving at the end of May when school dismisses. I'm losing my whole network and it's got me in a panic.

Quoting KrissyKC:

If you homeschool and join a homeschooling group, depending on the hours you attend school, you might be able to find a hsing teen or other mother that would keep him for you during college.   That sounds like a terrific solution, especially if it's another mother because you would have an automatic "mentor" for HSing.

It really is seriosly doable.   You WILL have a more difficult time finding secular HSing groups, but they are out there.    Have you considered posting an add for other secular or non-religious homeschooling families... say at the library or something?

Maybe there is even another family that needs to send their child to a place like O2Bkids, and the kids would keep eachother company.

Another option is to juggle him with family, friends, see if SO can work his schedule around some... etc.






Mama Ajax @ Blogger

Just a little bit my life experiences.

romacox
by Silver Member on Apr. 23, 2013 at 3:25 PM
1 mom liked this

Mama Ajax.  I have had a hearing problem for many years.  Make sure he is pronouncing the phonic sounds correctly.   If they are pronouncing them wrong, it makes it hard for them to blend the sounds to form words..  Here is a link that will give you the correct way to pronounce the phonic sounds so that you can teach him.

Hear Phonic Sounds Free (for the educator, not the child)

MamaAjax
by on Apr. 23, 2013 at 3:44 PM

He's good a pronouncing them. It's what's saving his butt at the end of the day. He's really verbal too. He knows the meaning of the words he uses and all. He forgets that sounds blend though. Like "ch" he'll sound it out as a hard "c" then "h" and I'll be like "are you sure?" and then he'll say "Oh yeah! You mush it!" and then he'll get it right.

He really is baffling us all. He's good talking with his French and Spanish too. Which all during preschool I thought that that's where his developmental problems where coming from. They said kids who grow up in bi-lingual homes tend to be slower on the reading and talking side of things. Growing up tri-lingual I figured was the cause. I stopped using French at home couldn't really stop using the Spanish though cause of his godparents and his abuela. She uses more "Spanglish" Where if she can't think on how to say something in English she'll just flip over to using Spanish and complete the conversation that way.

But he knows how to express really well. Like he'll use sentences like "I am annoyed right now." or "The game is aggervating me." or "I'm agitated at so-n-so." He rarely says "I'm mad." he'll do the same with other expressions too. Sometimes he'll say one of his classmates is being "obtuse" when they make fun of him at school for his slow reading. And you can understand him clearly without having to focus in or strain. There's no slurring or mispronouncing of the words unless of course he's crying. 

Quoting romacox:

Mama Ajax.  I have had a hearing problem for many years.  Make sure he is pronouncing the phonic sounds correctly.   If they are pronouncing them wrong, it makes it hard for them to blend the sounds to form words..  Here is a link that will give you the correct way to pronounce the phonic sounds so that you can teach him.

Hear Phonic Sounds Free (for the educator, not the child)



Mama Ajax @ Blogger

Just a little bit my life experiences.

romacox
by Silver Member on Apr. 23, 2013 at 4:28 PM

As you describe him, he is beginning to sound like an analytic personality.  Does this describe your son?

P.S. Ring Around The Phonics teaches blends, and words on the board game itself.

Quoting MamaAjax:

He's good a pronouncing them. It's what's saving his butt at the end of the day. He's really verbal too. He knows the meaning of the words he uses and all. He forgets that sounds blend though. Like "ch" he'll sound it out as a hard "c" then "h" and I'll be like "are you sure?" and then he'll say "Oh yeah! You mush it!" and then he'll get it right.

He really is baffling us all. He's good talking with his French and Spanish too. Which all during preschool I thought that that's where his developmental problems where coming from. They said kids who grow up in bi-lingual homes tend to be slower on the reading and talking side of things. Growing up tri-lingual I figured was the cause. I stopped using French at home couldn't really stop using the Spanish though cause of his godparents and his abuela. She uses more "Spanglish" Where if she can't think on how to say something in English she'll just flip over to using Spanish and complete the conversation that way.

But he knows how to express really well. Like he'll use sentences like "I am annoyed right now." or "The game is aggervating me." or "I'm agitated at so-n-so." He rarely says "I'm mad." he'll do the same with other expressions too. Sometimes he'll say one of his classmates is being "obtuse" when they make fun of him at school for his slow reading. And you can understand him clearly without having to focus in or strain. There's no slurring or mispronouncing of the words unless of course he's crying. 

Quoting romacox:

Mama Ajax.  I have had a hearing problem for many years.  Make sure he is pronouncing the phonic sounds correctly.   If they are pronouncing them wrong, it makes it hard for them to blend the sounds to form words..  Here is a link that will give you the correct way to pronounce the phonic sounds so that you can teach him.

Hear Phonic Sounds Free (for the educator, not the child)





romacox
by Silver Member on Apr. 23, 2013 at 4:47 PM


GOOD NEWS:  I am in Florida, and you do not have to focus on FCAT standards, and you definately do not have follow the  public school approach which has failed so many children like your son.  The Florida Parent Educators Association lists the legal issues, and check with your district coordinator....some counties have some additional requirements. 

Getting Started In Florida Home Education

Legal issues in Florida ( There are home educators who are also teachers.  Many of them  will do the evaluations...They rarely give tests...it entails looking at the child's  portfolio, and asking them questions)  Your group of home school moms  can help you locate a good evaluator...don't use just any teacher)

Free Form Downloads. 


Quoting MamaAjax:

So far what I have gleamed from FL is that unless I fork out for private school and enroll him into one of their Home School programs I really still have to focus more towards the FCAT Standards and follow the same principles as public school. Which I'm loathing to no end.

Yeah that's my son. He'll just "melt down" and his teacher and I call it. He'll make himself physically ill crying so bad just trying to get him to read 5-6 words repeating over and over in 10-11 lines (it's 5 words per a line and it's the same words over and over). "Beat the Clock" game as they call it. 

Quoting amandae21:

Some kids just don't fit the public school mold. That's the beauty of homeschool. We don't have to emulate the public school in our homes. We can teach whatever we want, however we want (assuming you aren't in one of those hart-to-HS-in states).

My DD has problems with math. If I give her a worksheet with 20 simple problems on it, she'll take over an hour to complete it. If I write 3-4 problems on the whiteboard at a time, it's a breeze. I could put 20 simple addition problems on paper and she'd still have anxiety. When she was in PS, she would spend over an hour crying over one simple math homework sheet.

You can homeschool. It doesn't have to be during school hours. It can be whenever you want it to be. Could you afford to connect with another homeschool family and have them keep DS during the day, maybe have him complete some of his assignments there?

Here's a website for finding such families: http://parentsforliberty.org/connect


Quoting MamaAjax:


Yes, I've had three different people evaluate him. The first came back as ADHD. I refuted this which is what led me to the other two. He's just to calm and he's able to focus his attention no problem. He's never been a behavioral problem and all his teachers come to me saying "How polite he is." "He's so helpful." "He's really big on doing the responsible thing."

He'll sit and read, he's just super slow at it and spends so much time on sounding out the words that he doesn't comprehend what he's reading.

The second one told me "Absolutely nothing is wrong, he just has low self-esteem." I'll buy it. The self-esteem part anyways. Even his school psychologist said she's "Never seen a kid his age worry so much about grades like he does." He hates failing. He hates it when he doesn't get something right the first time. I think mainly because Math comes so easy to him and so does science he expects EVERYTHING to be that easy and he'll just beat himself up when it isn't.  

The third one said he's fine and came up with sending him to a speech specialist. Which is probable. He's had ear infections from the age of three months old. He got his first set of tubes at 9months old. I had to go around and around with his insurance to get a new type of tubes put in because the first one just didn't help. They said it was an "elective" surgery. We finally won our case when our ENT Dr. Stepped in and demanded it citing research during the hearing. He finally got the new type of tubes and had his adenoids removed. Problem solved. They tested his hearing and it's back in normal ranges for his age just now he's really sensitive to sounds. This was last year.    

Quoting amandae21:

Have you had him evaluated by any early intervention specialists outside of the school system?









coala
by Silver Member on Apr. 23, 2013 at 7:42 PM

What area are you in in Fl?  I have found a good strong network of families on the central FL area.

hwblyf
by Silver Member on Apr. 24, 2013 at 7:52 AM
1 mom liked this

Have you considered the possibility that he's gifted with a learning difficulty?  There are an awful lot of gifted students who are perfectionists, which can lead to them making themselves physically ill or just shutting down because something is "stupid" or "nobody can do this stuff" and it's really that they actually have to figure it out or learn it and other things come so easily to them.  

Check out the gifted homeschooler forum:  http://giftedhomeschoolers.org/

As for the play that he didn't like so he didn't hit their developmental milestones.  Please.  If everyone enjoyed the same thing, this parenting thing would be a breeze.  Didn't like to play house.  I have 5 kids.  My first one never fit the mold for anything anyone ever said he'd be like.  My kids played with the toy kitchen and such.  They climbed all over it, tore it apart, and used it as their paper for their artwork.  That's just a bully group of people.

motheroffour186
by Bronze Member on Apr. 24, 2013 at 9:27 AM

Hello how are you this morning?

www.ehow.com/how_134503_homeschool-child.html

www.wikihow.com/Homeschool

www.ehow.com/how_7911416_can-motivate-myself-go-school.html

www.ehow.com/how_7911416_can-motivate-myself-go-school.html

voices.yahoo.com/homeschool-tips-coping-sending-kids...

http://www.havefunteaching.com/

Damand.com password:BOB

hypergrammar (put in the seach bar) please

http://www.hslda.com/

Go to the library and ask for home school books on on how to home school.Do they know any home school groups your area. How to get a home school teacher card.

Mandallyn
by Member on Apr. 24, 2013 at 10:44 AM

Have you tried http://www.secularhomeschool.com/ ?  I found a lot of material that was very helpful.  In the end I put my own curriculum together, found what would help my son the most with his language arts skills.  You would need to figure out a schedule that would work with your school and studying and his.  Plus since you are his teacher, and he your only pupil, you would be able to tell if he's learned something well enough to move on, how much review he needs of previous material, and help him learn skills that can help him focus when it comes to reading.

I put my own curriculum together for DS because, like your son, he has difficulty with LA, but excels in math.  I found the best program that would meet DS' current skills and help him evolve those skills without putting too much stress on him. 

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