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autism reading comprehension strategies?

Posted by on Apr. 23, 2013 at 11:42 AM
  • 11 Replies

My 11 yr old is PDD-NOS.  His reading comprehension is somewhere between 1st-2nd grade level, but he can decode like a 10th grader. 

Has anyone had gains with a particular curriculum or have any tips on this?

Thanks!

by on Apr. 23, 2013 at 11:42 AM
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Replies (1-10):
mem82
by Platinum Member on Apr. 23, 2013 at 12:52 PM
1 mom liked this
Let me give you a bump! We have lots of ladies that are experienced with those types of issues. 8)
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usmom3
by BJ on Apr. 23, 2013 at 2:10 PM
2 moms liked this

 What I did with my High Functioning Autistic son when it came to improving his reading was to let him read what he wanted to read. After about 3 month's of him reading nothing but Garfield comic books I realized I needed to broadenhis horizon so I got graphic novels that where classic books like The Hunchback of  Notre Dame & A Tale of Two City's along with Graphic Novels of history & the Universe. He devoured those books, so I then went a step farther & started getting books like Percy Jackson & other new fantasy type books & he devoured those too. In 2 years he went from reading at a 4TH grade level to a 12TH grade level all because I gave him books that held his interest. You could do this with any reading material like gaming magazines (those things have great information & are not dumbed down like you might think). I hope this helps! 

collinsmommy0
by Member on Apr. 23, 2013 at 9:09 PM
1 mom liked this
When I taught a class with kids with HFA, aspergers, ADHD, etc, I found that graphic organizers helped a ton. We filled them in together as we read then they could look back for clarifying or remembering the story. I used a variety - story maps, cause/effect charts, inferencing charts, main idea & detail pages.

This will sound funny but they always did better with the premade graphic organizers as opposed to writing on notebook paper. I just bought a book of graphic organizers for upper graders & copied those pages, then used them with the appropriate book.
celticdragon77
by on Apr. 23, 2013 at 10:28 PM
1 mom liked this

How did you have him tested to know that? 

brennan5882300
by Member on Apr. 24, 2013 at 11:27 AM

Thank you!  :)


Quoting mem82:

Let me give you a bump! We have lots of ladies that are experienced with those types of issues. 8)



brennan5882300
by Member on Apr. 24, 2013 at 11:30 AM

This is extremely helpful!  I didn't even realize there are graphic versions of classics!  Thanks!!!  Plus it helps to start out on his favorites--I have a tendency to gear things towards my interests lol!  Thank you!


Quoting usmom3:

 What I did with my High Functioning Autistic son when it came to improving his reading was to let him read what he wanted to read. After about 3 month's of him reading nothing but Garfield comic books I realized I needed to broadenhis horizon so I got graphic novels that where classic books like The Hunchback of  Notre Dame & A Tale of Two City's along with Graphic Novels of history & the Universe. He devoured those books, so I then went a step farther & started getting books like Percy Jackson & other new fantasy type books & he devoured those too. In 2 years he went from reading at a 4TH grade level to a 12TH grade level all because I gave him books that held his interest. You could do this with any reading material like gaming magazines (those things have great information & are not dumbed down like you might think). I hope this helps! 



brennan5882300
by Member on Apr. 24, 2013 at 11:31 AM

Awesome idea!  I think I would benefit from the graphic organizers too!  :)  Thanks!


Quoting collinsmommy0:

When I taught a class with kids with HFA, aspergers, ADHD, etc, I found that graphic organizers helped a ton. We filled them in together as we read then they could look back for clarifying or remembering the story. I used a variety - story maps, cause/effect charts, inferencing charts, main idea & detail pages.

This will sound funny but they always did better with the premade graphic organizers as opposed to writing on notebook paper. I just bought a book of graphic organizers for upper graders & copied those pages, then used them with the appropriate book.



brennan5882300
by Member on Apr. 24, 2013 at 11:40 AM

He was evaluated by a developmental optometrist for vision therapy (www.covd.org).  They tested many things--it took about 2.5-3 hours. 

I'm too surprised with the results.  He's amazed his teachers since preschool at his reading ability.  I think that's why his comprehension issues went pretty much undetected until 4th grade.  Plus he struggles with expressive language so that was more the focus.


Quoting celticdragon77:

How did you have him tested to know that? 



usmom3
by BJ on Apr. 24, 2013 at 12:45 PM
1 mom liked this
Our library has a large selection of the graphic novels. Something else I did was I got books like Harry Potter that he was interested in but intimidated by the size of as audio books & the actual book & had him listen to the audio book while he fallowed along in the book (this helped him with knowing how a word is supposed to sound without the stress of sounding it out). I would also get the book of any TV show or movie he liked, for example his favorite Christmas movie is The Christmas Carol so I got the book for him to read & now he loves that book more then the movie.

Quoting brennan5882300:

This is extremely helpful!  I didn't even realize there are graphic versions of classics!  Thanks!!!  Plus it helps to start out on his favorites--I have a tendency to gear things towards my interests lol!  Thank you!



Quoting usmom3:

 What I did with my High Functioning Autistic son when it came to improving his reading was to let him read what he wanted to read. After about 3 month's of him reading nothing but Garfield comic books I realized I needed to broadenhis horizon so I got graphic novels that where classic books like The Hunchback of  Notre Dame & A Tale of Two City's along with Graphic Novels of history & the Universe. He devoured those books, so I then went a step farther & started getting books like Percy Jackson & other new fantasy type books & he devoured those too. In 2 years he went from reading at a 4TH grade level to a 12TH grade level all because I gave him books that held his interest. You could do this with any reading material like gaming magazines (those things have great information & are not dumbed down like you might think). I hope this helps! 




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brennan5882300
by Member on Apr. 25, 2013 at 3:02 PM

Wow that's another great idea--to read along with the audio.  We have an amazing library so I'm sure this will be a great option for us.  Thanks so much!!!


Quoting usmom3:

Our library has a large selection of the graphic novels. Something else I did was I got books like Harry Potter that he was interested in but intimidated by the size of as audio books & the actual book & had him listen to the audio book while he fallowed along in the book (this helped him with knowing how a word is supposed to sound without the stress of sounding it out). I would also get the book of any TV show or movie he liked, for example his favorite Christmas movie is The Christmas Carol so I got the book for him to read & now he loves that book more then the movie.

Quoting brennan5882300:

This is extremely helpful!  I didn't even realize there are graphic versions of classics!  Thanks!!!  Plus it helps to start out on his favorites--I have a tendency to gear things towards my interests lol!  Thank you!



Quoting usmom3:

 What I did with my High Functioning Autistic son when it came to improving his reading was to let him read what he wanted to read. After about 3 month's of him reading nothing but Garfield comic books I realized I needed to broadenhis horizon so I got graphic novels that where classic books like The Hunchback of  Notre Dame & A Tale of Two City's along with Graphic Novels of history & the Universe. He devoured those books, so I then went a step farther & started getting books like Percy Jackson & other new fantasy type books & he devoured those too. In 2 years he went from reading at a 4TH grade level to a 12TH grade level all because I gave him books that held his interest. You could do this with any reading material like gaming magazines (those things have great information & are not dumbed down like you might think). I hope this helps! 






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