Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

It's not clicking

Posted by on Apr. 26, 2013 at 6:01 PM
  • 30 Replies

Ds is 4 years old.  We are starting a kindergarten curriculum this fall, but I have already been working with him (hence why we are doing kindergarten vs preschool).  He knows his letter names and sounds, but it's not clicking for him with how to combine sounds to form a word.  He wants to read, and I think sometimes he's trying too hard (overthinking it). 

Example:  He'll look at the word "sat" and say "ssss-aaaa-tttttt says...Sam (another word he's used to "reading" that starts with the same letter).  I might say "What does cccccc-aaaaaa-tttttt say?" and he'll respond "hmmm... let's see... hmmm... I have to think about it."

Do you have any tips to help him?  He's been stuck on this for a couple of months now.  Every now and then he'll say the word without even thinking (once he sounded out "cat" and lost focus.  I said "Buddy, focus on what we're doing." and he said "I said "cat").  I've tried to encourage him when he does that, but that seems to lead to overthinking again.

by on Apr. 26, 2013 at 6:01 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
bren_darlene
by Bronze Member on Apr. 26, 2013 at 6:07 PM
4 moms liked this

 Honestly I never, ever tried doing any "school" with any of my children at the age of 4.  We just played and they learned all they needed.  I read to them and pointed at the words as I read.  I colored, did puzzles, played games, ect...   If he naturally picks it up fine, other wise just enjoy your little boy and him being little :-)

bekalynne440
by on Apr. 26, 2013 at 6:35 PM

The thing is he wants so badly to read.  He's not interested in being read to usually, but he wants to be able to do it himself.  I'm mostly just trying to help him with what he's wanting.


Quoting bren_darlene:

 Honestly I never, ever tried doing any "school" with any of my children at the age of 4.  We just played and they learned all they needed.  I read to them and pointed at the words as I read.  I colored, did puzzles, played games, ect...   If he naturally picks it up fine, other wise just enjoy your little boy and him being little :-)



usmom3
by BJ on Apr. 26, 2013 at 6:44 PM
1 mom liked this

 Get him read a-long books where he can see & hear the words at the same time, put closed captioning on the TV when he watches something, put labels on everything & then read them to him when ever use it or pass it, putting words where he sees & hears them together might be what he needs to help concrete it in his brain.

My kids never showed intrest in reading at that age & I never pushed it, but all of that is what I would have done if I was in your situation.

Leissaintexas
by Bronze Member on Apr. 26, 2013 at 7:07 PM
1 mom liked this

Its similar to when my ds wanted to ride his bike. Just because he WANTED to didn't mean he was ready and able! I know you just want to help him, but honestly, he's just not ready. Try starfall.com or a similar game type program. He just needs time for his little brain to mature a bit before those sounds start clicking for him.

Maridel
by on Apr. 26, 2013 at 7:16 PM

We used Teach Your CHild to Read in 100 Easy Lessons. While I didn't like the book and method as a whole, I like the way it taught to blend the letters. write the word SAT, then underline it with and arrow ------> that way, then put a dot under each letter. Ok I'm having a really hard time describing this, maybe I can find a youtube video showing it. Anyway it really helped my DD. But either way, he's only 4, don't stress. He will get it just keep practicing as long as he's willing and don't push it if he's not. 

KickButtMama
by Shannon on Apr. 26, 2013 at 9:39 PM

Www.readingeggs.com helped my youngest.

TJandKarasMom
by Debbie on Apr. 26, 2013 at 9:50 PM
1 mom liked this
The only thing I can think of is when you are teaching him how to blend, don't over emphasize the sounds. Make sure he isn't saying that b says ba, d says da, etc, make sure the sounds he makes for each letter are short or quick, if that makes sense. It's hard to explain in writing, but if he thinks c says ca then he will read ca-a-ta instead if c-a-t and he wont get it because ca-a-ta doesn't sound anything like cat. Also, the arrows work, write the letters with short blue arrows under each letter, then one longer red arrow under the whole word (any color will do, but different colors from the letters and length of arrow will help him differentiate).

Also, leaving out books for him that only have a word or two on each page with a picture that will help him determine the words could increase his confidence.
mem82
by Platinum Member on Apr. 26, 2013 at 10:00 PM

This

Quoting TJandKarasMom:

The only thing I can think of is when you are teaching him how to blend, don't over emphasize the sounds. Make sure he isn't saying that b says ba, d says da, etc, make sure the sounds he makes for each letter are short or quick, if that makes sense. It's hard to explain in writing, but if he thinks c says ca then he will read ca-a-ta instead if c-a-t and he wont get it because ca-a-ta doesn't sound anything like cat. Also, the arrows work, write the letters with short blue arrows under each letter, then one longer red arrow under the whole word (any color will do, but different colors from the letters and length of arrow will help him differentiate).

Also, leaving out books for him that only have a word or two on each page with a picture that will help him determine the words could increase his confidence.


bekalynne440
by on Apr. 26, 2013 at 10:02 PM
That makes sense! I will definitely work on that!


Quoting TJandKarasMom:

The only thing I can think of is when you are teaching him how to blend, don't over emphasize the sounds. Make sure he isn't saying that b says ba, d says da, etc, make sure the sounds he makes for each letter are short or quick, if that makes sense. It's hard to explain in writing, but if he thinks c says ca then he will read ca-a-ta instead if c-a-t and he wont get it because ca-a-ta doesn't sound anything like cat. Also, the arrows work, write the letters with short blue arrows under each letter, then one longer red arrow under the whole word (any color will do, but different colors from the letters and length of arrow will help him differentiate).



Also, leaving out books for him that only have a word or two on each page with a picture that will help him determine the words could increase his confidence.

KrissyKC
by Silver Member on Apr. 26, 2013 at 11:03 PM

1.  take some time off... 4 is pretty young, and where he's at is pretty good.   Focus on some other things and enjoy this time when he's enthralled with your reading TO him.

2.  make sure he's making his letter sounds right.   like b should just be b not bah...  otherwise words like bed can come out like buh-eh-duh, which is hard for them to decipher.

3.  do a lot of work on beginning sounds, ending sounds, and then middle sounds of words.   Don't try to make him read them until he can pick out the beginning, ending, and middle sounds.  Introduce each seperately.

4.  when you do start words, start teaching the ending PART of the word.. like _at, _in, _ad, etc... start with at and see how many words you can make that have AT in them (three letter words, like cat, sat, rat, fat, mat)  do at for a week or two, then move onto in words or somethng else...  do several of these and then go back and review them.   So instead of putting together three seperate parts to the word, he's matching just the different beginning sounds with the end part.


Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

close Join now to connect to
other members!
Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN