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Ds is 4 years old.  We are starting a kindergarten curriculum this fall, but I have already been working with him (hence why we are doing kindergarten vs preschool).  He knows his letter names and sounds, but it's not clicking for him with how to combine sounds to form a word.  He wants to read, and I think sometimes he's trying too hard (overthinking it). 

Example:  He'll look at the word "sat" and say "ssss-aaaa-tttttt says...Sam (another word he's used to "reading" that starts with the same letter).  I might say "What does cccccc-aaaaaa-tttttt say?" and he'll respond "hmmm... let's see... hmmm... I have to think about it."

Do you have any tips to help him?  He's been stuck on this for a couple of months now.  Every now and then he'll say the word without even thinking (once he sounded out "cat" and lost focus.  I said "Buddy, focus on what we're doing." and he said "I said "cat").  I've tried to encourage him when he does that, but that seems to lead to overthinking again.

by on Apr. 26, 2013 at 6:01 PM
Replies (21-30):
katinahat
by Member on Apr. 27, 2013 at 12:58 PM
1 mom liked this

"I know you just want to help him, but honestly, he's just not ready."
That is an assessment, and it's a discouraging one. A mother struggling to teach her child needs encouragement and positive ideas, not discouragement and "he's just not ready". She knows her child and she thinks that he's ready. She's asking for advice on techniques and strategies to help him.

Just because a child struggles with a concept, it doesn't mean that they are currently unable to grasp it. It means that the parent needs to be creative and present it in another way, one that the child can more clearly understand. Definitely did not happen in a day-- but I didn't get the impression from the OP that she is expecting her son to learn in a day. Just that she wants to help him get over this speed bump and continue on his journey to becoming a reader.

Quoting Leissaintexas:


Hey ease up there, momma. I'm not making an "assessment". I don't care one way or another how old a kid is, if they are struggling, it's not time! All I'm saying is that this mom is asking for tips on how to make this easy for him, and I'm suggesting he needs more time. I didn't say stop school for two years, I didn't say leave him alone. I simply meant that learning will occur naturally in it's own time and it wasn't an overnight thing. I'm sure there are lots of people who read early, I'm not disputing that. But I can promise you it didn't happen in one day.

Quoting katinahat:

How can you make that assessment when you haven't met the child? From two CafeMom posts? I'm not a genius, but I was reading at 2 1/2 because I was ready to handle it-- my Mom saw that I wanted to read and spent time working on it with me, so by 2 1/2, I was able to read simple books and sentences (i.e. The cat is fat, The car is red, etc.). You can't say that he isn't ready to read just because he is young-- that's such a misconception. If the child wants to read and is interested, I say power to him. He is definitely NOT too young to read!

Quoting Leissaintexas:

Its similar to when my ds wanted to ride his bike. Just because he WANTED to didn't mean he was ready and able! I know you just want to help him, but honestly, he's just not ready. Try starfall.com or a similar game type program. He just needs time for his little brain to mature a bit before those sounds start clicking for him.







____________________________________________________________

Christian, vaccinating, fun-loving, breastfeeding, cloth diapering, positive disciplining, nerdy, extended rear-facing, bookworm, creative, homeschooling, outdoorsy, autodidactic, friendly family.

"If you judge people, you have no time to love them." -- Mother Teresa

http://merrrfamily.blogspot.com/

maggiemom2000
by Member on Apr. 27, 2013 at 11:49 PM

Lots of info on teaching those things here. Check out the sight words, and the beginning phonics.


Growing Readers

Are you Growing a Reader? Homeschooling your early reader? No need to buy an expensive curriculum to get your child off to a great start at reading. Do you want to avoid tedious, boring worksheets and instead learn through engaging hands on activities and play? Here are a collection of links on teaching your child to read and write for free:

Sight Words or Phonics? How about a balanced approach?


Read some background on using a balanced literacy approach to teach your child to read. What does your Kindergartner need to learn in reading? See the list of Common Core Kindergarten Standards and links to activities to teach those skills to your emergent reader.

What do I need to Buy?

The short answer: nothing. You can do all of the lessons and activities here using books from the library and things you already have around the house like paper, pens, chalk, and index cards. In this post I suggest some possible things you can buy to enhance the activities. These are supplies that you will be able to use for years, not just for a couple of lessons. Manipulatives like a good set of magnetic letters can be used from preschool into elementary school, beginning with basic letter identification, on to phonics, building sight words, word families and complex multisyllabic spelling words.

Shared Literature

Read, read, read to your child. Reading aloud to your child is the best thing you can do to grow a reader. Go beyond reading aloud and teach your child reading skills while enjoying great literature! (Preschool, Pre-K, Kindergarten)

Early Alphabet Learning and the Name Game

How to begin teaching the alphabet and other early literacy skills to your preschooler or Kindergartner. (Preschool, Pre-K, Kindergarten)

Kindergarten Sight Words and Early Reading Skills

What you need to know to get started teaching your Kindergartner to read including a look at some of the Common Core Standards for Kindergarten reading. (Kindergarten)

Kindergarten Sight Word Sentences

After you know about teaching sight words to your Kindergartner you are ready to move on to sentences. (Kindergarten)

Kindergarten Sight Words Reading Books

Once you start introducing your child to the sight words he is ready for his first emergent-reader book. (Kindergarten)

Beginning Phonics for Emergent Readers

Once your child knows most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds he is ready to learn to "sound out" simple CVC words. This post shows you lots of hands on multi-sensory ways to practice early phonics. (Kindergarten, First Grade)

Learn 37 Words and Know how to Read and Write Over 500 Words!

Your child can learn more phonics "rules" by learning several words with common letter patterns. When your child learns to make analogies and manipulate onset and rime they can quickly read and write hundreds of new words. These are better known as word families. (Kindergarten, First Grade, Second Grade)
Mommynay2
by Member on Apr. 28, 2013 at 12:21 PM
I wouldn't stress it. He is 4 maybe you can make a book appealing to him. You get a book about something he is interested in. Then when you are alone with him or have some form of downtime, take the book as if you are reading to yourself. Then start laughing hysterically as if you are really into it, or some kind of emotion to get him curious as to why you are reacting to it.
mem82
by Platinum Member on Apr. 28, 2013 at 3:01 PM

Have you tried teaching him sight words?

motheroffour186
by Bronze Member on Apr. 28, 2013 at 6:27 PM
www.havefunteaching.com
Damamd.com


Quoting bekalynne440:

Ds is 4 years old.  We are starting a kindergarten curriculum this fall, but I have already been working with him (hence why we are doing kindergarten vs preschool).  He knows his letter names and sounds, but it's not clicking for him with how to combine sounds to form a word.  He wants to read, and I think sometimes he's trying too hard (overthinking it). 

Example:  He'll look at the word "sat" and say "ssss-aaaa-tttttt says...Sam (another word he's used to "reading" that starts with the same letter).  I might say "What does cccccc-aaaaaa-tttttt say?" and he'll respond "hmmm... let's see... hmmm... I have to think about it."

Do you have any tips to help him?  He's been stuck on this for a couple of months now.  Every now and then he'll say the word without even thinking (once he sounded out "cat" and lost focus.  I said "Buddy, focus on what we're doing." and he said "I said "cat").  I've tried to encourage him when he does that, but that seems to lead to overthinking again.


mem82
by Platinum Member on Apr. 28, 2013 at 10:26 PM
Try to remember that most advice given out in this group with the intention of helping each other. If the advice given isn't helpful, just move on. 8) There is no need for our group to have an angry vibe. 8)
Jlee4249
by Member on Apr. 29, 2013 at 11:26 AM
1 mom liked this
Take the pressure off.
That's all.
My son had just turned four when he wanted to read so badly.
We got the letter sounds down. Then every night when I read stories, I'd "struggle" on a word per page & sound it out, two or three times before I said it. (and I read with my finger so he could see which word I was on).
Then I'd sound out a word, only one a day, by writing it on the board & sound it out myself & ask him what does that say. He'd hear me sounding it out & easily and happily "help" me.
I never pushed it, it was always him-helping-me... So he never felt pressured to read.
Next thing I know hebrings down a curious George book & he was trying to sound out everything. So I sat next to him & helped. It was his first book. I never made him struggle to figure things out b/c I wanted to keep it fun. So after he tried, I sounded it out for him so he could hear it. He kept going, he's still four and can read better than his 7yo sister. He remembers how to spell everything, too!!! (she actually asks him for help sometimes!)
So don't give up hope. Four is not too young. Good luck
snazzylady1
by Member on Apr. 29, 2013 at 4:07 PM
1 mom liked this

I agree with Bren_darlene.  At 4 I would just focus on providing literacy experiences like reading to him, and taking him to children's theatre as well as musuems for an enriched literacy exposure.  Use every momment possible as a teachable momment.  For instance when you are leaving a restaurant and point to the exit sign have read it.  Or if you see that caution sign for wet floor.  Tell him what it means.  Signs that distinguish between womens and mens washrooms.  This is called environmental print.  Rich print experiences help a lot with preparing children to read.  In the mean time if you really want to have him read, I would suggest books with no more than 2 words per page.  The goal is keeping him interested in learning and knowing that learning is fun.  He is so young and you do not want him to experience frustration at such an early age.

Tonya Simmons

smartandsnazzykids.com

JocelynsMama1
by on Apr. 29, 2013 at 9:41 PM

my daughter was doing the same thing and occasionally still will if she gets lazy but over all shes reading simple books now! I used te reading program on all in one homeschool and its like all of a sudden she started to understand it. Also when shes sounding out words rather than just saying each sound se does better if i cover te letters and uncover them one at a time 

sdgd21
by Member on Apr. 29, 2013 at 9:49 PM

not all children are ready that early, becareful, if you push him too hard, he'll hate it.  That is not how you want to start school with him right? I have 4 one read at 3 one at 7 another well, lol he is 10 we just went back over his phonics lol. my 6 year old, is doing okay.

All boys, all different. lol

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