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Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

Ds is 4 years old.  We are starting a kindergarten curriculum this fall, but I have already been working with him (hence why we are doing kindergarten vs preschool).  He knows his letter names and sounds, but it's not clicking for him with how to combine sounds to form a word.  He wants to read, and I think sometimes he's trying too hard (overthinking it). 

Example:  He'll look at the word "sat" and say "ssss-aaaa-tttttt says...Sam (another word he's used to "reading" that starts with the same letter).  I might say "What does cccccc-aaaaaa-tttttt say?" and he'll respond "hmmm... let's see... hmmm... I have to think about it."

Do you have any tips to help him?  He's been stuck on this for a couple of months now.  Every now and then he'll say the word without even thinking (once he sounded out "cat" and lost focus.  I said "Buddy, focus on what we're doing." and he said "I said "cat").  I've tried to encourage him when he does that, but that seems to lead to overthinking again.

by on Apr. 26, 2013 at 6:01 PM
Replies (11-20):
KrissyKC
by Silver Member on Apr. 26, 2013 at 11:06 PM
1 mom liked this

oh and to get him more interested in your reading to him, play a game.. like "when you hear me read the word tiger." in this next book I want you to jump up and growl... mark down the number of times he jumps up and growls and compare that to how many times tiger is in the book.    Give two stickers if he finds all of them, and one if he finds at least x number of times the word appears.   At the end of the week, celebrate how many stickers he has with a reward (small car, game, award)


debramommyof4
by Silver Member on Apr. 27, 2013 at 12:34 AM

 I reminded my now 6 year old that she needed to resound out the word and then I would sound it out for her so she could hear it.  It helped her.

Bluecalm
by Bronze Member on Apr. 27, 2013 at 7:33 AM
In my opinion, he's just not ready to make that leap into reading. I'd back off for now but keep reading to him.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
romacox
by Silver Member on Apr. 27, 2013 at 7:37 AM

To teach children how to blend, I use the game Ring Around The Phonics. The kids love it.   With games (physically involving the children in the learning process), children learn faster, retain more, love learning, and it reduces stress (for you and the child).. 

My children get excited about crowning their character with the "gold and blue rings of knowledge".  They also like the activity cards which help release energy which helps them focus, but they also teach comprehension.

It comes with 14 early reader books.  When the child learns their first 8 letter sounds, they read their first book.  When they learn the next 6 sounds, they read their second book.  This is important so that children are associating phonics with reading early on. 

katinahat
by Member on Apr. 27, 2013 at 9:10 AM

How can you make that assessment when you haven't met the child? From two CafeMom posts? I'm not a genius, but I was reading at 2 1/2 because I was ready to handle it-- my Mom saw that I wanted to read and spent time working on it with me, so by 2 1/2, I was able to read simple books and sentences (i.e. The cat is fat, The car is red, etc.). You can't say that he isn't ready to read just because he is young-- that's such a misconception. If the child wants to read and is interested, I say power to him. He is definitely NOT too young to read!

Quoting Leissaintexas:

Its similar to when my ds wanted to ride his bike. Just because he WANTED to didn't mean he was ready and able! I know you just want to help him, but honestly, he's just not ready. Try starfall.com or a similar game type program. He just needs time for his little brain to mature a bit before those sounds start clicking for him.



____________________________________________________________

Christian, vaccinating, fun-loving, breastfeeding, cloth diapering, positive disciplining, nerdy, extended rear-facing, bookworm, creative, homeschooling, outdoorsy, autodidactic, friendly family.

"If you judge people, you have no time to love them." -- Mother Teresa

http://merrrfamily.blogspot.com/

bekalynne440
by on Apr. 27, 2013 at 10:19 AM

Thank you!  That's how I feel! 

He wanted to try again this morning and he did much better.  He's still not getting it every time, but he managed to sound out over half of the "at" words we did this morning!  I'm so happy for him!

I have already learned that homeschooling is different for each child and each family.  I've heard so many people on here (well meaning) say "Just teach them through play; don't do anything formal."  I know that works for some people and that's great.  At around 2.5 if I tried teaching through play my son would say "No mommy, I playing."  He likes to compartimentalize (as do I) and he would much rather have playtime be more informal and learning be a little more formal.  He wants to learn and desperately wants do to "school".  Somewhere he picked up on kids going to public schools (probably a kids' show as his friends right now are all homeschooled) and he now feels he needs some type of schooling.  All those factors combined I feel we are doing what is best for us.


Quoting katinahat:

How can you make that assessment when you haven't met the child? From two CafeMom posts? I'm not a genius, but I was reading at 2 1/2 because I was ready to handle it-- my Mom saw that I wanted to read and spent time working on it with me, so by 2 1/2, I was able to read simple books and sentences (i.e. The cat is fat, The car is red, etc.). You can't say that he isn't ready to read just because he is young-- that's such a misconception. If the child wants to read and is interested, I say power to him. He is definitely NOT too young to read!

Quoting Leissaintexas:

Its similar to when my ds wanted to ride his bike. Just because he WANTED to didn't mean he was ready and able! I know you just want to help him, but honestly, he's just not ready. Try starfall.com or a similar game type program. He just needs time for his little brain to mature a bit before those sounds start clicking for him.





Mandallyn
by Member on Apr. 27, 2013 at 12:05 PM
Have you tried starting with the ending sounds first and then adding on the front sounds? That's how my son finally ended up getting it.
Leissaintexas
by Bronze Member on Apr. 27, 2013 at 12:17 PM

 

Hey ease up there, momma. I'm not making an "assessment". I don't care one way or another how old a kid is, if they are struggling, it's not time! All I'm saying is that this mom is asking for tips on how to make this easy for him, and I'm suggesting he needs more time. I didn't say stop school for two years, I didn't say leave him alone. I simply meant that learning will occur naturally in it's own time and it wasn't an overnight thing. I'm sure there are lots of people who read early, I'm not disputing that. But I can promise you it didn't happen in one day.

Quoting katinahat:

How can you make that assessment when you haven't met the child? From two CafeMom posts? I'm not a genius, but I was reading at 2 1/2 because I was ready to handle it-- my Mom saw that I wanted to read and spent time working on it with me, so by 2 1/2, I was able to read simple books and sentences (i.e. The cat is fat, The car is red, etc.). You can't say that he isn't ready to read just because he is young-- that's such a misconception. If the child wants to read and is interested, I say power to him. He is definitely NOT too young to read!

Quoting Leissaintexas:

Its similar to when my ds wanted to ride his bike. Just because he WANTED to didn't mean he was ready and able! I know you just want to help him, but honestly, he's just not ready. Try starfall.com or a similar game type program. He just needs time for his little brain to mature a bit before those sounds start clicking for him.

 

 


 

katinahat
by Member on Apr. 27, 2013 at 12:54 PM
1 mom liked this

Awesome!! It sounds to me like he is making great progress :) Slow progress is okay at his age-- it sounds like you're really taking the time and effort to work with him and he's learning just fine. In the past, I've taught through play (in my informal education classes), but it's a specific transition to "learning moments" for the kids. It's a "put your thinking caps on" kind of thing-- otherwise I found that the kids got really distracted and didn't get to hear the whole explanation. And that led to problems down the road where they ended up with half truths and holes in their understanding of the topic. Just a personal preference-- I prefer to have a definable transition between "play play" and "learning play".

Also, it sounds like you're going more for the traditional homeschooling method-- nothing wrong with that! I'm going to be doing a mix of traditional and ecclectic. You have to find what works for you and your child.

Quoting bekalynne440:

Thank you!  That's how I feel! 

He wanted to try again this morning and he did much better.  He's still not getting it every time, but he managed to sound out over half of the "at" words we did this morning!  I'm so happy for him!

I have already learned that homeschooling is different for each child and each family.  I've heard so many people on here (well meaning) say "Just teach them through play; don't do anything formal."  I know that works for some people and that's great.  At around 2.5 if I tried teaching through play my son would say "No mommy, I playing."  He likes to compartimentalize (as do I) and he would much rather have playtime be more informal and learning be a little more formal.  He wants to learn and desperately wants do to "school".  Somewhere he picked up on kids going to public schools (probably a kids' show as his friends right now are all homeschooled) and he now feels he needs some type of schooling.  All those factors combined I feel we are doing what is best for us.


Quoting katinahat:

How can you make that assessment when you haven't met the child? From two CafeMom posts? I'm not a genius, but I was reading at 2 1/2 because I was ready to handle it-- my Mom saw that I wanted to read and spent time working on it with me, so by 2 1/2, I was able to read simple books and sentences (i.e. The cat is fat, The car is red, etc.). You can't say that he isn't ready to read just because he is young-- that's such a misconception. If the child wants to read and is interested, I say power to him. He is definitely NOT too young to read!

Quoting Leissaintexas:

Its similar to when my ds wanted to ride his bike. Just because he WANTED to didn't mean he was ready and able! I know you just want to help him, but honestly, he's just not ready. Try starfall.com or a similar game type program. He just needs time for his little brain to mature a bit before those sounds start clicking for him.







____________________________________________________________

Christian, vaccinating, fun-loving, breastfeeding, cloth diapering, positive disciplining, nerdy, extended rear-facing, bookworm, creative, homeschooling, outdoorsy, autodidactic, friendly family.

"If you judge people, you have no time to love them." -- Mother Teresa

http://merrrfamily.blogspot.com/

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