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STEM to STEAM: Adding Art to Science, Technology, Engineering and Math

Posted by on May. 1, 2013 at 9:53 AM
  • 3 Replies


Art, Design Educational Needs Pushing STEM To STEAM

A push for better U.S. art and design education is changing STEM to STEAM.

Science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) have long been the Holy Grail of a U.S. drive for improved education, producing students who can compete globally. But a growing chorus says art and design must be in the mix.

The STEAM movement has wide-ranging support from academia, business and government.

Apple's product design, such as its late-'90s iMacs, has made it a winner.

Apple's product design, such as its late-'90s iMacs, has made it a winner. View Enlarged Image

"How do you humanize technology? Art and design does that," said John Maeda, president of the Rhode Island School of Design in Providence.

Founded in 1877 to enable the American textile industry to compete with Europe, the private school is a leader in the STEM to STEAM movement.

RISD's efforts include providing fellowships to its students for STEAM-related projects. And it's working with the National Science Foundation on a climate change study, the only art school in the country doing something along those lines, Maeda says.

Some tech companies are aboard in adding the "A" to STEM, Maeda says.

SusanTheWriter ~ Wife, Mom, Author

by on May. 1, 2013 at 9:53 AM
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SusanTheWriter
by on May. 1, 2013 at 9:57 AM

This guy was in a symposium at a CA school district about the STEAM focus.

Dale Dougherty is the President and CEO of Maker Media,Inc. Make magazine started in 2005 followed by the first Maker Faire in the Bay Area in 2006. In 2012, Maker Faire was held in the Bay Area with over 110,000 guests, and also at a smaller scale in Detroit and New York. In 2011, the White House recognized Dale as a “Champion of Change: Make It In America,” for his work in helping to create high-quality jobs in the United States. In May 2012, Dale led the launch of Maker Education Initiative, a non-profit dedicated to creating opportunities for young people to make. He is passionate about fostering a new generation of 'makers' who are creative, innovative, and curious.

Maker Faire

MakerShed.com - a storefront for science/tech kits.

katinahat
by on May. 1, 2013 at 10:29 AM
1 mom liked this

Eh, I understand what he's saying, but I disagree with the transformation of the term. There's a misconception going on that STEM professionals can't be creative-- they absolutely can be and frequently are. It doesn't mean that you have to push visual or performing art into the technical fields like engineering and physics. I don't know, that just doesn't feel right for me. Let STEM keep their own darn category-- the arts already have theirs. I mean, are we going to add literature, music, history, etc. to it? STEAMLMHJFLKAJFLKDAJFLKSJA? Let STEM be STEM and let the arts be the arts. Neither is more or less valuable than the other.

____________________________________________________________

Christian, vaccinating, fun-loving, breastfeeding, cloth diapering, positive disciplining, nerdy, extended rear-facing, bookworm, creative, homeschooling, outdoorsy, autodidactic, friendly family.

"If you judge people, you have no time to love them." -- Mother Teresa

http://merrrfamily.blogspot.com/

lucsch
by on May. 1, 2013 at 8:20 PM
1 mom liked this

Hmmm.....you know, I was an engineering major--one who struggled to choose between engineering, math, and music as a major. I also took art/painting lessons as a child. I love all of that stuff. LOL I ended up working as a software engineer, which takes as much creativity as it does technical skill.

BTW, this post made me remember a technical drawing class I had to take as an engineering student. I loved it!

Am I the only one that hates all this pigeon-holing? STEM rubs me wrong. I want a balanced education for my dd. Yes, that includes a lot of science and math, but aren't the other subjects equally as important to produce a well-rounded, culturally literate adult?


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