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This is what he can do so far. We are homeschooling through the summer also; so as of now he knows:

Reading:
I am not really sure how to rate his reading. We usually check out step 1, 2, and 3 books from the library. He seems to have no problems with step 1 books (or level one readers); seems to have little trouble with step 2 (level 2) readers and he has moderate problems with step 3s. He tries to sound out the words and use picture cues to figure out what's going on if he can't read a word.

Writing:
He knows that sentences begin with a capital letter and end with a punctuation mark. He knows which sentences need periods, exclamation, and question marks. He understands linking verbs and action verbs and their uses. He understands past tense and present tense. He understands nouns. He can write complete sentences correctly.

Spelling: He knows the difference between consonants and vowels. He knows the vowwels sounds (short and long). He is able to break the words apart (syllables). Is actually a decent speller because he can break the word down enough to hear all letters. Silent e still tricks him sometimes tho.

Math:
He can add double digit problems. He can add single digits. He can subtract single digit numbers. He understands number families. He can count by 2, 5, 10s. Is doing decently with counting by 3s, 6s (has not mastered tho). He can tell time by hour, half hour but has not mastered quarter past or quarter till, has not mastered minutes after an hour; i.e, 12:08 but is doing well with those. Has the understand of simple fractions and how to use a ruler. Understands <, >, and the sign for not equal and can use them correctly. Knows place values to the hundredth. He can add together 12+11+13= So those type of problems are easy for him and he can do it with just single digits as well. He can read a calendar and fill in the missing dates. He can read a simple bar graph and fill one out. He can read and successfully math written numbers like sixty to numerical numbers like 60. Knows his shapes. Uhm... i could be forgetting some in this area. We have covered a lot.
Science:
Understands basic photosynthesis, basic water cycle, basic growth cycles of butterflies, toads, ladybugs and the like, understands living things vs. Non living things, understands what mammals are, understand what lizards are. I know there are tons more here because we've gone over physical science and earth science so he should understand the basics of both plus some basic astronomy and basic chemistry.

History/SS/geography:
Can understand simple maps, point out the compass and directions, understand basic legends. Knows basics about Christopher Columbus, Native Americans, Pocahontas, knows basics about Revoluntionary war; like: Paul Revere and the lights, George Washington was General and then became President, the boston tea party, and a few other things. Knows a little about the civil war and a little about ww2. Starting to learn the states and location of each.

We are also teaching Spanish and he has picked that up surprisingly well but that isn't really core materials.

SO does he sound on track.
by on May. 10, 2013 at 9:59 PM
Replies (11-15):
Precious333
by Silver Member on May. 12, 2013 at 11:08 AM
1 mom liked this
Sounds great! I have a first grader too :) i dont worry too much about whether or not he is below, at or above the average, as long as he is learning and moving forward.
bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on May. 12, 2013 at 4:17 PM
1 mom liked this
Quoting JKronrod:

 This is off topic, but your comment was very interesting to me.  I know that I am a visual reader in that I imagine pictures in my head when I read.  However, I always had trouble (and by trouble I mean that I didn't enjoy) many 19th century novels.  I think that this may be because many of those novels are more aurally than visually oriented (and thinking in particular of Jane Austin).  It never occurred to me that the TEACHING orientation was toward the visual -- notwithstanding that children are having trouble with that today.  Where did you get your information?  It makes me wonder whether I have an unconcious bias in how I am teaching reading to my six-year-old. 

 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 He sounds great!  With regards to reading, do you have him draw pictures that he "sees" while you read to him?  A great reader pictures the story in their heads, but kids are having trouble with this today because of television and the overuse of picture books.  Reading teachers will work on this by having the students draw a picture of what happens at the beginning/ middle/ end of a story.  It helps with comprehension and sequencing as well and gives a better read on how the child is reading at this young age.  I only mention this because you said you were not sure how to rate his reading.

 

 

 My Content Methods courses in college.  Studies show that kids who are able to get into the world they are reading score higher on comprehension tests, interpret literature in more in depth ways, and have a larger lexicon (not just vocabulary but the words they actualy use) than the kids who are not able to immerse themselves in what they read.  Actually the 19th century novels are simply more difficult to immerse in because they are not something easy to imagine for 21st century readers.  We have to create everything from our imagination.  When we read science fiction we are still able to visualize their clothing because we simply dress them in simple garb from today (typically if you ask a kid how the sci-fi character is dressed they'll put them in a black t-shirt and black pants).

It's not an unconscious bias in the way you are teaching.  We as humans have always tryed to picture the stories to make them more real.  Imagine how grandpa used to sit and watch the radio.  Creating images in his mind as the story went on.  Since the days of cave paintings, images have always been an important aspect of story telling.  You MUST create the experience in your head.

Read the book: When Kids Can't Read: What Teachers Can Do by Kylene Beers.
Or Reading in the Content Area by Cox.

They talk about methods to get kids picturing their reading and what happens when they are.  Including pictures of brain scans of kids who are picturing and those not.  The ones picturing the elements of the story are using much more of the frontal lobe (making connections) and their memory centers.  Kids not picturing the story are only firing in their short term memory, but not commiting it to long term.

JKronrod
by Bronze Member on May. 12, 2013 at 8:14 PM

 


Quoting bluerooffarm:

Quoting JKronrod:

 This is off topic, but your comment was very interesting to me.  I know that I am a visual reader in that I imagine pictures in my head when I read.  However, I always had trouble (and by trouble I mean that I didn't enjoy) many 19th century novels.  I think that this may be because many of those novels are more aurally than visually oriented (and thinking in particular of Jane Austin).  It never occurred to me that the TEACHING orientation was toward the visual -- notwithstanding that children are having trouble with that today.  Where did you get your information?  It makes me wonder whether I have an unconcious bias in how I am teaching reading to my six-year-old. 

 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 He sounds great!  With regards to reading, do you have him draw pictures that he "sees" while you read to him?  A great reader pictures the story in their heads, but kids are having trouble with this today because of television and the overuse of picture books.  Reading teachers will work on this by having the students draw a picture of what happens at the beginning/ middle/ end of a story.  It helps with comprehension and sequencing as well and gives a better read on how the child is reading at this young age.  I only mention this because you said you were not sure how to rate his reading.

 

 

 My Content Methods courses in college.  Studies show that kids who are able to get into the world they are reading score higher on comprehension tests, interpret literature in more in depth ways, and have a larger lexicon (not just vocabulary but the words they actualy use) than the kids who are not able to immerse themselves in what they read.  Actually the 19th century novels are simply more difficult to immerse in because they are not something easy to imagine for 21st century readers.  We have to create everything from our imagination.  When we read science fiction we are still able to visualize their clothing because we simply dress them in simple garb from today (typically if you ask a kid how the sci-fi character is dressed they'll put them in a black t-shirt and black pants).

It's not an unconscious bias in the way you are teaching.  We as humans have always tryed to picture the stories to make them more real.  Imagine how grandpa used to sit and watch the radio.  Creating images in his mind as the story went on.  Since the days of cave paintings, images have always been an important aspect of story telling.  You MUST create the experience in your head.

Read the book: When Kids Can't Read: What Teachers Can Do by Kylene Beers.
Or Reading in the Content Area by Cox.

They talk about methods to get kids picturing their reading and what happens when they are.  Including pictures of brain scans of kids who are picturing and those not.  The ones picturing the elements of the story are using much more of the frontal lobe (making connections) and their memory centers.  Kids not picturing the story are only firing in their short term memory, but not commiting it to long term.

I understand what you are saying, and it makes sense, but I think we're talking about slightly different things.  You are discussing whether a reader can imagine what is going on.  I realized in reading your comment that I'm not saying that one doesn't imagine what is going on, but rather that for some novels it's easier to figure out what is going on (create those images) when one hears the words spoken as opposed to seeing the words on the page.  When I'm reading, I don't "hear" the words -- I simply see what is going on.  And, that's what I mean when I say that there are novels that are more aural in orientation.  For example,  I have no problem with Jane Austin when it's read aloud.  And, for me, at least, it's not  all 19th century novels -- I have no problem with Charlotte Bronte (Jane Eyre is one of my favorite novels), although I do have a problem with her sister's work.  My thought is that because books in the 19th century were often read aloud, at least some of the writers wrote in a way that favored "hearing" rather than "seeing" the words, in the same way that a play is easier to understand/appreciate when it is performed.    Out of curiosity, is one of the techniques to get kids to image the story better subvocalizing? 

 

bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on May. 12, 2013 at 9:23 PM

 

Quoting JKronrod:

 

 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

Quoting JKronrod:

 This is off topic, but your comment was very interesting to me.  I know that I am a visual reader in that I imagine pictures in my head when I read.  However, I always had trouble (and by trouble I mean that I didn't enjoy) many 19th century novels.  I think that this may be because many of those novels are more aurally than visually oriented (and thinking in particular of Jane Austin).  It never occurred to me that the TEACHING orientation was toward the visual -- notwithstanding that children are having trouble with that today.  Where did you get your information?  It makes me wonder whether I have an unconcious bias in how I am teaching reading to my six-year-old. 

 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 He sounds great!  With regards to reading, do you have him draw pictures that he "sees" while you read to him?  A great reader pictures the story in their heads, but kids are having trouble with this today because of television and the overuse of picture books.  Reading teachers will work on this by having the students draw a picture of what happens at the beginning/ middle/ end of a story.  It helps with comprehension and sequencing as well and gives a better read on how the child is reading at this young age.  I only mention this because you said you were not sure how to rate his reading.

 

 

 My Content Methods courses in college.  Studies show that kids who are able to get into the world they are reading score higher on comprehension tests, interpret literature in more in depth ways, and have a larger lexicon (not just vocabulary but the words they actualy use) than the kids who are not able to immerse themselves in what they read.  Actually the 19th century novels are simply more difficult to immerse in because they are not something easy to imagine for 21st century readers.  We have to create everything from our imagination.  When we read science fiction we are still able to visualize their clothing because we simply dress them in simple garb from today (typically if you ask a kid how the sci-fi character is dressed they'll put them in a black t-shirt and black pants).

It's not an unconscious bias in the way you are teaching.  We as humans have always tryed to picture the stories to make them more real.  Imagine how grandpa used to sit and watch the radio.  Creating images in his mind as the story went on.  Since the days of cave paintings, images have always been an important aspect of story telling.  You MUST create the experience in your head.

Read the book: When Kids Can't Read: What Teachers Can Do by Kylene Beers.
Or Reading in the Content Area by Cox.

They talk about methods to get kids picturing their reading and what happens when they are.  Including pictures of brain scans of kids who are picturing and those not.  The ones picturing the elements of the story are using much more of the frontal lobe (making connections) and their memory centers.  Kids not picturing the story are only firing in their short term memory, but not commiting it to long term.

I understand what you are saying, and it makes sense, but I think we're talking about slightly different things.  You are discussing whether a reader can imagine what is going on.  I realized in reading your comment that I'm not saying that one doesn't imagine what is going on, but rather that for some novels it's easier to figure out what is going on (create those images) when one hears the words spoken as opposed to seeing the words on the page.  When I'm reading, I don't "hear" the words -- I simply see what is going on.  And, that's what I mean when I say that there are novels that are more aural in orientation.  For example,  I have no problem with Jane Austin when it's read aloud.  And, for me, at least, it's not  all 19th century novels -- I have no problem with Charlotte Bronte (Jane Eyre is one of my favorite novels), although I do have a problem with her sister's work.  My thought is that because books in the 19th century were often read aloud, at least some of the writers wrote in a way that favored "hearing" rather than "seeing" the words, in the same way that a play is easier to understand/appreciate when it is performed.    Out of curiosity, is one of the techniques to get kids to image the story better subvocalizing? 

 

 Ahhh, yeah I see what you are saying.  Yes, it is easier to visualize some novels when they are read aloud.  Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels for example.  Yes, subvocalizing is used more for older kids (middle/high school) that have difficulty.  A whisper phone is usually used for the younger grades because it is difficult for younger students to "hear" their own voice.

JKronrod
by Bronze Member on May. 12, 2013 at 10:36 PM
1 mom liked this

 


Quoting bluerooffarm:

 

Quoting JKronrod:

 

 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

Quoting JKronrod:

 This is off topic, but your comment was very interesting to me.  I know that I am a visual reader in that I imagine pictures in my head when I read.  However, I always had trouble (and by trouble I mean that I didn't enjoy) many 19th century novels.  I think that this may be because many of those novels are more aurally than visually oriented (and thinking in particular of Jane Austin).  It never occurred to me that the TEACHING orientation was toward the visual -- notwithstanding that children are having trouble with that today.  Where did you get your information?  It makes me wonder whether I have an unconcious bias in how I am teaching reading to my six-year-old. 

 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 He sounds great!  With regards to reading, do you have him draw pictures that he "sees" while you read to him?  A great reader pictures the story in their heads, but kids are having trouble with this today because of television and the overuse of picture books.  Reading teachers will work on this by having the students draw a picture of what happens at the beginning/ middle/ end of a story.  It helps with comprehension and sequencing as well and gives a better read on how the child is reading at this young age.  I only mention this because you said you were not sure how to rate his reading.

 

 

 My Content Methods courses in college.  Studies show that kids who are able to get into the world they are reading score higher on comprehension tests, interpret literature in more in depth ways, and have a larger lexicon (not just vocabulary but the words they actualy use) than the kids who are not able to immerse themselves in what they read.  Actually the 19th century novels are simply more difficult to immerse in because they are not something easy to imagine for 21st century readers.  We have to create everything from our imagination.  When we read science fiction we are still able to visualize their clothing because we simply dress them in simple garb from today (typically if you ask a kid how the sci-fi character is dressed they'll put them in a black t-shirt and black pants).

It's not an unconscious bias in the way you are teaching.  We as humans have always tryed to picture the stories to make them more real.  Imagine how grandpa used to sit and watch the radio.  Creating images in his mind as the story went on.  Since the days of cave paintings, images have always been an important aspect of story telling.  You MUST create the experience in your head.

Read the book: When Kids Can't Read: What Teachers Can Do by Kylene Beers.
Or Reading in the Content Area by Cox.

They talk about methods to get kids picturing their reading and what happens when they are.  Including pictures of brain scans of kids who are picturing and those not.  The ones picturing the elements of the story are using much more of the frontal lobe (making connections) and their memory centers.  Kids not picturing the story are only firing in their short term memory, but not commiting it to long term.

I understand what you are saying, and it makes sense, but I think we're talking about slightly different things.  You are discussing whether a reader can imagine what is going on.  I realized in reading your comment that I'm not saying that one doesn't imagine what is going on, but rather that for some novels it's easier to figure out what is going on (create those images) when one hears the words spoken as opposed to seeing the words on the page.  When I'm reading, I don't "hear" the words -- I simply see what is going on.  And, that's what I mean when I say that there are novels that are more aural in orientation.  For example,  I have no problem with Jane Austin when it's read aloud.  And, for me, at least, it's not  all 19th century novels -- I have no problem with Charlotte Bronte (Jane Eyre is one of my favorite novels), although I do have a problem with her sister's work.  My thought is that because books in the 19th century were often read aloud, at least some of the writers wrote in a way that favored "hearing" rather than "seeing" the words, in the same way that a play is easier to understand/appreciate when it is performed.    Out of curiosity, is one of the techniques to get kids to image the story better subvocalizing? 

 

 Ahhh, yeah I see what you are saying.  Yes, it is easier to visualize some novels when they are read aloud.  Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels for example.  Yes, subvocalizing is used more for older kids (middle/high school) that have difficulty.  A whisper phone is usually used for the younger grades because it is difficult for younger students to "hear" their own voice.

Very interesting!  Thanks for the information.

 

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