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Seriously.. What is the difference? Homeschooling or Schooling at home.

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I am not being snarky, I am not being rhetorical.. I mean it with all my heart!

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE!

I admit I probably have been doing schooling at home.. Because I really only have the experiance of what I did as a kid at public school..

Some of you will remember my post from a few weeks ago about failing my son.. from our first year at homeschooling..(and that plan btw HAS CHANGED.) But I am learning that there apparently are some huge differences.. but I can't put my finger on it and explain it.. or truely conceptualize it!

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by on May. 28, 2013 at 9:18 AM
Replies (21-30):
HopeJoyPeace1
by on May. 28, 2013 at 2:38 PM

Thanks.. I need a cyber hug! I appreciate it.. I get used to being bashed here on cafemom.. group hugThankfully not here in Homeschooling mom's though! 

Quoting QueenCreole313:

Oh here's a cyber hug. Remember with homeschool you have until they are 18 or whenever they are ready to graduate to go from reading letters to writing essays and from adding to algebra. Someone kids take longer but as long as you hey there no matter how many detors you are on the eight path!

Quoting HopeJoyPeace1:

GUILTY!

Everything in red.. Is me!

I admit totally that half the year was HELL cause I was so totally freaking out cause we wouldn't finish the curriculum I bought.. I honest to God feel like I wasted money on educational materials and "HE HASN'T DONE THEM" banging head into wall Inside my head there is this angry woman doing this..angrytsk tsk ... And that woman comes out.. she grow's horns.. and makes my 10 year oldtoddler tantrum

And all cause.. I feel this PRESSURE.. To make him finish.. like there is  a time crunch.. and something horrible will happen if we don't finish in time.. Btw.. Just so you all know.. Since I posted the last post..We've been on a break.. With only maybe 1 hour of educational stuff a day.. cause I hate the she devil I turned into this year!devil

But LIKE I said.. I am guilty of all that you said in red..

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 Okay this is how I would explain it.... schooling at home is homeschooling, BUT not all homeschooling is school-at-home.  School at home is when you have a set number of hours to sit and work on set lessons plans that come mostly out of books and workbooks.  It is like having a public school classroom invade your home.  (yes, I am biased BUT...) I don't consider people who do this for one or two subjects OR who do this for 1-2 days of the week OR who do it when it is needed as school-at-home families.  When your schedule reads like a public school schedule (Math 9:00-10:00, Phonics 10:00-11:00, Reading 11:00-12:00, lunch 12-12:30, Science 12:30-1:30, History 1:30-2:30, snack 2:30-3, Gym/nutrition/health 3-4) Then you are school-at-home learning.  It is easier to burn out and you fear not "completing" your curriculum.
Homeschooling is when you do whatever you need to do to get your child learning and loving to learn.  You take lots of field trips OR you learn science outside OR you learn history by making historical foods and games OR you learn spelling by playing Scrabble today.  Your schedule is more like... we'll do math, phonics, and reading this morning and then we may get to take a break and watch the butterfly come out of its cocoon.  It is any or all of the things in this entire post, because school-at-home is ONE version of homeschooling.


Does that make sense?



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bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on May. 28, 2013 at 3:53 PM
1 mom liked this

 There is no guilty here.  All there is, is realizing what you are doing HAS burned you out (based on what you highlighted red) and picking up with something different later.  Seriously everyone does homeschool differently and I have no problem at all with people who emulate the school system, but if it's not working always remember that there are other methods you can try!

butterfly on headRemember to take time to watch the butterflies, Relax and boy kissing momenjoy your little one...nerdyallow yourself to geek out about things (there is nothing more interesting than something you LIKE to do!  So they will want to learn it because YOU make it interesting!)

shooting photoTake some pictures of the stuff you've done and put them on a bulletin board.  That way when you feel overwhelmed by all the stuff you are not getting done right now, You can look at the stuff that you got done earlier in the year.

jugglingYou, as mom, need to juggle school in with everything else you need to do... And so does he!

Homeschooling is all about getting flexible and listening to HOW you all learn together as a family!

blowing kissesYou are still doing a great job because you picked up on the cues that it's not working.  Keep up the good work, Momma!

Quoting HopeJoyPeace1:

GUILTY!

Everything in red.. Is me!

I admit totally that half the year was HELL cause I was so totally freaking out cause we wouldn't finish the curriculum I bought.. I honest to God feel like I wasted money on educational materials and "HE HASN'T DONE THEM" banging head into wall Inside my head there is this angry woman doing this..angrytsk tsk ... And that woman comes out.. she grow's horns.. and makes my 10 year oldtoddler tantrum

And all cause.. I feel this PRESSURE.. To make him finish.. like there is  a time crunch.. and something horrible will happen if we don't finish in time.. Btw.. Just so you all know.. Since I posted the last post..We've been on a break.. With only maybe 1 hour of educational stuff a day.. cause I hate the she devil I turned into this year!devil

But LIKE I said.. I am guilty of all that you said in red..

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 Okay this is how I would explain it.... schooling at home is homeschooling, BUT not all homeschooling is school-at-home.  School at home is when you have a set number of hours to sit and work on set lessons plans that come mostly out of books and workbooks.  It is like having a public school classroom invade your home.  (yes, I am biased BUT...) I don't consider people who do this for one or two subjects OR who do this for 1-2 days of the week OR who do it when it is needed as school-at-home families.  When your schedule reads like a public school schedule (Math 9:00-10:00, Phonics 10:00-11:00, Reading 11:00-12:00, lunch 12-12:30, Science 12:30-1:30, History 1:30-2:30, snack 2:30-3, Gym/nutrition/health 3-4) Then you are school-at-home learning.  It is easier to burn out and you fear not "completing" your curriculum.
Homeschooling is when you do whatever you need to do to get your child learning and loving to learn.  You take lots of field trips OR you learn science outside OR you learn history by making historical foods and games OR you learn spelling by playing Scrabble today.  Your schedule is more like... we'll do math, phonics, and reading this morning and then we may get to take a break and watch the butterfly come out of its cocoon.  It is any or all of the things in this entire post, because school-at-home is ONE version of homeschooling.

Does that make sense?


 

bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on May. 28, 2013 at 3:58 PM

 Having set times was not my point, sorry if it came off that way.  It was more about having something set each and every hour all day long just like public school (clear from 9-4).

Yeah, I would say as long as you control your schedule and your schedule is NOT controlling you, you are A-OK!  It's when it gets long and drawn out and mostly sitting at a desk with worksheets and textbooks that I feel we've lost sight of the learning and are mostly checking off our "to do" list.

Quoting JKronrod:

 I like your distinctions, but I would say that more broadly it's all about control.  When you and your children are in control of your day (even if, like me, it's your 14-year-old who's designed his own schedule which DOES have math and writing, etc. at set times)  it's not likely to be "schooling at home." 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 Okay this is how I would explain it.... schooling at home is homeschooling, BUT not all homeschooling is school-at-home.  School at home is when you have a set number of hours to sit and work on set lessons plans that come mostly out of books and workbooks.  It is like having a public school classroom invade your home.  (yes, I am biased BUT...) I don't consider people who do this for one or two subjects OR who do this for 1-2 days of the week OR who do it when it is needed as school-at-home families.  When your schedule reads like a public school schedule (Math 9:00-10:00, Phonics 10:00-11:00, Reading 11:00-12:00, lunch 12-12:30, Science 12:30-1:30, History 1:30-2:30, snack 2:30-3, Gym/nutrition/health 3-4) Then you are school-at-home learning.  It is easier to burn out and you fear not "completing" your curriculum.
Homeschooling is when you do whatever you need to do to get your child learning and loving to learn.  You take lots of field trips OR you learn science outside OR you learn history by making historical foods and games OR you learn spelling by playing Scrabble today.  Your schedule is more like... we'll do math, phonics, and reading this morning and then we may get to take a break and watch the butterfly come out of its cocoon.  It is any or all of the things in this entire post, because school-at-home is ONE version of homeschooling.

Does that make sense?

 

 

 

mem82
by Platinum Member on May. 28, 2013 at 9:27 PM
1 mom liked this
That mom has lived in all of us.

Quoting HopeJoyPeace1:

GUILTY!

Everything in red.. Is me!

I admit totally that half the year was HELL cause I was so totally freaking out cause we wouldn't finish the curriculum I bought.. I honest to God feel like I wasted money on educational materials and "HE HASN'T DONE THEM" banging head into wall Inside my head there is this angry woman doing this..angrytsk tsk ... And that woman comes out.. she grow's horns.. and makes my 10 year oldtoddler tantrum

And all cause.. I feel this PRESSURE.. To make him finish.. like there is  a time crunch.. and something horrible will happen if we don't finish in time.. Btw.. Just so you all know.. Since I posted the last post..We've been on a break.. With only maybe 1 hour of educational stuff a day.. cause I hate the she devil I turned into this year!devil

But LIKE I said.. I am guilty of all that you said in red..

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 Okay this is how I would explain it.... schooling at home is homeschooling, BUT not all homeschooling is school-at-home.  School at home is when you have a set number of hours to sit and work on set lessons plans that come mostly out of books and workbooks.  It is like having a public school classroom invade your home.  (yes, I am biased BUT...) I don't consider people who do this for one or two subjects OR who do this for 1-2 days of the week OR who do it when it is needed as school-at-home families.  When your schedule reads like a public school schedule (Math 9:00-10:00, Phonics 10:00-11:00, Reading 11:00-12:00, lunch 12-12:30, Science 12:30-1:30, History 1:30-2:30, snack 2:30-3, Gym/nutrition/health 3-4) Then you are school-at-home learning.  It is easier to burn out and you fear not "completing" your curriculum.
Homeschooling is when you do whatever you need to do to get your child learning and loving to learn.  You take lots of field trips OR you learn science outside OR you learn history by making historical foods and games OR you learn spelling by playing Scrabble today.  Your schedule is more like... we'll do math, phonics, and reading this morning and then we may get to take a break and watch the butterfly come out of its cocoon.  It is any or all of the things in this entire post, because school-at-home is ONE version of homeschooling.


Does that make sense?


JKronrod
by Bronze Member on May. 29, 2013 at 12:54 AM
2 moms liked this

 Amen. 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 Having set times was not my point, sorry if it came off that way.  It was more about having something set each and every hour all day long just like public school (clear from 9-4).

Yeah, I would say as long as you control your schedule and your schedule is NOT controlling you, you are A-OK!  It's when it gets long and drawn out and mostly sitting at a desk with worksheets and textbooks that I feel we've lost sight of the learning and are mostly checking off our "to do" list.

Quoting JKronrod:

 I like your distinctions, but I would say that more broadly it's all about control.  When you and your children are in control of your day (even if, like me, it's your 14-year-old who's designed his own schedule which DOES have math and writing, etc. at set times)  it's not likely to be "schooling at home." 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 Okay this is how I would explain it.... schooling at home is homeschooling, BUT not all homeschooling is school-at-home.  School at home is when you have a set number of hours to sit and work on set lessons plans that come mostly out of books and workbooks.  It is like having a public school classroom invade your home.  (yes, I am biased BUT...) I don't consider people who do this for one or two subjects OR who do this for 1-2 days of the week OR who do it when it is needed as school-at-home families.  When your schedule reads like a public school schedule (Math 9:00-10:00, Phonics 10:00-11:00, Reading 11:00-12:00, lunch 12-12:30, Science 12:30-1:30, History 1:30-2:30, snack 2:30-3, Gym/nutrition/health 3-4) Then you are school-at-home learning.  It is easier to burn out and you fear not "completing" your curriculum.
Homeschooling is when you do whatever you need to do to get your child learning and loving to learn.  You take lots of field trips OR you learn science outside OR you learn history by making historical foods and games OR you learn spelling by playing Scrabble today.  Your schedule is more like... we'll do math, phonics, and reading this morning and then we may get to take a break and watch the butterfly come out of its cocoon.  It is any or all of the things in this entire post, because school-at-home is ONE version of homeschooling.

Does that make sense?

 

 

 


 

Kari_Noelle
by on May. 29, 2013 at 4:57 AM

group hugI am afraid of being that mom devil

Quoting HopeJoyPeace1:

Thanks.. I need a cyber hug! I appreciate it.. I get used to being bashed here on cafemom.. group hugThankfully not here in Homeschooling mom's though! 

Quoting QueenCreole313:

Oh here's a cyber hug. Remember with homeschool you have until they are 18 or whenever they are ready to graduate to go from reading letters to writing essays and from adding to algebra. Someone kids take longer but as long as you hey there no matter how many detors you are on the eight path!

Quoting HopeJoyPeace1:

GUILTY!

Everything in red.. Is me!

I admit totally that half the year was HELL cause I was so totally freaking out cause we wouldn't finish the curriculum I bought.. I honest to God feel like I wasted money on educational materials and "HE HASN'T DONE THEM" banging head into wall Inside my head there is this angry woman doing this..angrytsk tsk ... And that woman comes out.. she grow's horns.. and makes my 10 year oldtoddler tantrum

And all cause.. I feel this PRESSURE.. To make him finish.. like there is  a time crunch.. and something horrible will happen if we don't finish in time.. Btw.. Just so you all know.. Since I posted the last post..We've been on a break.. With only maybe 1 hour of educational stuff a day.. cause I hate the she devil I turned into this year!devil

But LIKE I said.. I am guilty of all that you said in red..

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 Okay this is how I would explain it.... schooling at home is homeschooling, BUT not all homeschooling is school-at-home.  School at home is when you have a set number of hours to sit and work on set lessons plans that come mostly out of books and workbooks.  It is like having a public school classroom invade your home.  (yes, I am biased BUT...) I don't consider people who do this for one or two subjects OR who do this for 1-2 days of the week OR who do it when it is needed as school-at-home families.  When your schedule reads like a public school schedule (Math 9:00-10:00, Phonics 10:00-11:00, Reading 11:00-12:00, lunch 12-12:30, Science 12:30-1:30, History 1:30-2:30, snack 2:30-3, Gym/nutrition/health 3-4) Then you are school-at-home learning.  It is easier to burn out and you fear not "completing" your curriculum.
Homeschooling is when you do whatever you need to do to get your child learning and loving to learn.  You take lots of field trips OR you learn science outside OR you learn history by making historical foods and games OR you learn spelling by playing Scrabble today.  Your schedule is more like... we'll do math, phonics, and reading this morning and then we may get to take a break and watch the butterfly come out of its cocoon.  It is any or all of the things in this entire post, because school-at-home is ONE version of homeschooling.


Does that make sense?




CaitsCookies
by on May. 29, 2013 at 10:53 AM
I have to keep reminding myself of the PROGRESS we're making, especially when people start asking what the 11yo has been learning, especially if he says nothing. I find myself telling them that I sneak in the math, reading, history, & science so that he doesn't know he's learning. I tell them that we've been focusing on teaching him better coping skills and better ways to work with others. I tell them that we've been working on his special needs, which include major anxiety if he's given any worksheets. I've NO idea why I feel compelled to tell them all that, other than I'm letting other people's expectations of what school should be cause me to be toooooo sensitive. I'm still trying to not be so sensitive about other people judging our methods.
bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on May. 29, 2013 at 11:13 AM
2 moms liked this

 

Quoting CaitsCookies:

I have to keep reminding myself of the PROGRESS we're making, especially when people start asking what the 11yo has been learning, especially if he says nothing. I find myself telling them that I sneak in the math, reading, history, & science so that he doesn't know he's learning. I tell them that we've been focusing on teaching him better coping skills and better ways to work with others. I tell them that we've been working on his special needs, which include major anxiety if he's given any worksheets. I've NO idea why I feel compelled to tell them all that, other than I'm letting other people's expectations of what school should be cause me to be toooooo sensitive. I'm still trying to not be so sensitive about other people judging our methods.

 Why is it that when someone asks an 11yo public school student "what are you learning?" That nearly everyone expects them to say "nothing."  BUT if they ask an 11yo homeschool student they expect a disseration on particle physics!!  LOL!  You are making progress Momma!  Keep up the good work! :-)

sha_lyn68
by Bronze Member on May. 29, 2013 at 1:48 PM
1 mom liked this

When I say "school at home" I am usually referring to public school at home programs. Here's a c/p of a post I reply I made this am when someone asked whether people consider online public schools to be homeschooling or public school:

What one "considers" it to be is irrelevant IMHO. They are legally considered public schools. While in casual conversation it doesn't make a bit of difference, IE someone sees your kid out and about and asks "What, no school today?" If the answer they get is "I'm homeschool", no big deal there. The difference comes when making blanket statements or answering questions. I see it happen all the time both online and IRL. Someone will make a statement like "The mandatory homeschool CRCT testing is next week" when they are in fact talking about the CRCT for students enrolled in GA Cyber Academy. 


romacox
by Silver Member on Aug. 6, 2013 at 4:11 PM
1 mom liked this


There are two kinds of school at home.  One is simply duplicating the Conventional method (lectures, workbooks, sit down at a desk type work. ..  It it is working for you and your children, go for it...we support you.  If it is not working for you, following is a free web page to help:

Latest Brain Research On What Works, And What Doesn't (Home Educators Were "Right All Along)

The second school at home is the  "on line programs subsidized by the Federal Government".  No one here would condemn you for starting out with these programs.  However many of us would encourage you to wean off of these programs as soon as possible, and the following free web pages explain why.  

Home School Legal Defense Association Explains

Will Family Educators Dodge This Bullet

An Article From The New York Times

Judge Napolitano explains this is exactly how states lost their freedom.  It is about maintaining the freedom for parents  to choose what is best for each individual child, and not be forced to choose a one size fits all approach which teachers tell us is  now forced on them against their will.


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