Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

Hey, Pennsylvania mommas that report.....

Posted by   + Show Post

 I had my evaluation yesterday, and it got me thinking.

I reviewed the DOE website before my evaluation and I think they are asking for more than they are legally allowed.  So I've got some questions....

1.  Did your evaluator bring a "test" for your child?  My evaluator had my 6yo (kindergarten) write all his letters, his full name, and all his numbers; read a few sight words; say his alphabet; and say the sounds that the letters make.  She had my 8yo (2nd grader) do a math test and read an excerpt.

2.  She wanted way more lessons than are required.  She asked if that was "all we had done".  I told her that the DOE says that the portfolio should contain 2-3 pieces of work from each subject studied that year.  Most evaluators in other areas ask for a 2" binder o smaller.

3.  She wants the reports from the diagnostic test we took.  It is not a requirement, but I did use it as 2 days of classes.

4.  She would really like to see me use a full curriculum.  She suggested Abeka (4 times!!) and Sonlight.  I told her there weren't any I liked and asked if the boys "passed" their evaluation.  She said yes, but pushed again for a full curriculum.  She evaluates all of the ladies in our church and I think she wanted to see that I was teaching religion.  Since it is not a public school or a DOE requirement, I do not include it in my portfolio.  It is personal.  Also everyone else in the church uses Abeka, Sonlight, or MFW.  So I think she just wants to make it easy on herself.

Anyway, what do you ladies think?

by on Jun. 10, 2013 at 8:20 AM
Replies (11-20):
celticdragon77
by on Jun. 10, 2013 at 4:42 PM

Yes, I deleted that, I kind of got side tracked with that. But yeah, I recently had a meeting with the school and everything they said contradicted the homeschooling laws. 

Why is your school having a meeting with you? In the past, I just sign a log stating I was there and dropped off my portfolio - and the secretary calls someone out to take my portfolio. No one talks to me at all. Even if there is an issue, I get a letter. Just a heads up type letter to inform me that they prefer this or that or that some things are "objectional".

Who knows what this year will be like tho. Their threat to send the homeschool director out to my house to supervise and monitor us was ridiculous, but is worrisome about what it will be like to deal with the public schools. Even MORE odd, is that I told them in that same meeting, that the kids would be in a different school district next year. So why they were threatening to send THEIR "homeschool director" is even more ridiculous. Also, the school district does not have a "homeschool director" persay. It is the director of education - or something like that. He has a way more important job duties than to sit at my house all day and watch us do school.

By LAW the school has to give me their curriculum and materials that are grade level. They said they didn't have to. I reminded them that it was not only the law to do so - but they ALSO would have to allow a homeschooler to participate in extra curricular activities. It is worrisome that some of this scare tactics might work on a new homeschooler who do not know the laws.

I tried K12 my very first year, and found more red tape with that, than just homeschooling on my own. I do not like state testing, and they did it every year. I worked 1st shift at that time and they said we could do school around my schedule. That ended up not being entirely true! They had to be logged in by a certain time in the morning and certain online classes or scheduled (and of course during the day - which I do understand). It had SO much busy work! I was told by one of the kids teachers, that it wasn't expected that a child do all of it. That they are offering as much or as little as a child might need - and incorporating all learning styles. So we began cherry picking and supplementing. I ended up in trouble for that. By the end of the year, I was ready to just homeschool on my own. 

I thought K12 was required to transfer records to another school?! 

 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 Sorry, I should have explained the DIBELS test.  My first son scored higher than the ending score for the dibels in the beginning of his 1st grade year.  When I asked what their goals for him were their answer was that he would probably improve over the year.  So I asked them aside from the dibels test what were their goals for him and their answer was that he was doing very well and he would probably improve in all areas over the year.  Seriously?  He would "probably improve"? 

I think if your school uses the DRA they do not use the dibels, but I'm not positive about that.

Somehow some of your quote disappeared.  You said something about how the school was contrary to the homeschooling laws.  Ours has been very against our homeschooling.  It's been a difficult run.  I tried using K12 to get away from them, but I hated k12 so badly that I'm willing to try again.  But it looks to be the same problems.  They won't count days before August 1st, but they want a meeting and to receive my affadavit at the meeting at the end of June.  We are year-rounders so we will have far more than enough days next year, but it is aggrivating when they are physically crossing off days on our calendar in front of my kids (last year).  Then this year they want an accounting of what the kids did with k12.  Iasked them if they would expect a parent who had moved here from another school to have kept all of the information from that other public school and bring it in to this one?  Of course they thought that was silly, but requesting it from me was just fine. 

Sorry, anyway, it's just as frustrating this time around.

Quoting celticdragon77:

I agree with you about full box curriculums!

I went and researched Dibels. I had heard of it, but never looked into it. I have never heard it mentioned by my kids school. I hear more about the DRA for measure of reading. I found it VERY interesting, what the criticism was of the Dibels. How would I know if my school uses this assessment?

I know, ask, but my school is VERY guarded for some reason with information. BY LAW, they HAVE to give me a curriculum outline for the year - they won't. BY LAW, they have to give me grade level materials - they won't. I have not pushed the issue, and won't. I have asked various information regarding the kids and I get stone walled.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 I do not think I'll be using her next year, if I can get out of it without causing some kind of stir in the church.  Although maybe next year will be different because I'll be doing the entire 180 days, so my book log will be longer and I'll go ahead and put the DORA report in.  It took us an hour with her, granted there were 2 kids.  I saw the lady before me and her binder was 6inches plus she brought in all of her textbooks.  It was quite a balancing act.

I'm more for following the law to the letter, so this doesn't feel right to me.  Especially because I don't want a full box curriculum.  I like choosing what's right for the kiddos.

Also we left the public school partly because of the DIBELS testing, so for her to test them that way anyhow, just seems counter-intuitive.

Quoting celticdragon77:

I am in Pennsylvania.

My first year homeschooling (my 6th grade child), I had a 2" binder FULL of samples AND a cdrom of pictures. I was told to take some out by the evaluator. Then I handed it into the school and received a letter saying that they were getting "too much" from homeschoolers and had to set a limit. 

Ever since then, I just give them a flash drive. I scan everything into the computer and drag it into the flashdrive at the end of the year. 

My kids were never formally tested by the evaluator. However, they DO need to make sure learning took place. So they can talk to your child and ask questions. Our evaluator just asked them what they learned concerning specific topics that she saw in our portfolio. It was a short conversation - maybe fifteen minutes. She also asked my daughter to start thinking about college and high school. She discussed what my daughters options were as a homeschooler. Our evaulator was VERY supportive and knowledgable about the homeschooling community in our area. She was a teacher that homeschooled her own three kids.

My evaulator and my school district were not supportive of me using Sonlight. When my portfolio was returned to me, there were even markings on some of the books off the reading list - all of them were Sonlight books. The evaluator mentioned to me that she did not like what we had for Sonlight, in our portfolio. She also warned me that the school district might make mention of it too. Sure enough, a letter stated that some of the materials used were "objectional".

I used the Eastern Hemisphere one, of Sonlight. I had to heavily supplement it. It appeared to mainly be about missionarys going over to convert people of that area of the world. My daughter was in 6th grade at the time and did the work mainly on her own. So, I did not entirely know what was being covered. My daughter INSISTED she was learning a lot. By the end of the year, she wanted to be a missionary!  

It all depends on what YOU are looking for. I personally agreed with my evaluator and school district on the issue of Sonlight, so it was no big deal. Some parents would like someone to test their child - others would not. Some people like to hand in loads of stuff into the school (or think they have to - like I did at first) - others do not. You have to find an evaluator that best suits you. 

Your evaluators expectations are NOT the legal expectation or requirement. 

 


 


luvcats406
by Member on Jun. 10, 2013 at 4:46 PM

Wow, and I thought my state(NY) was strict.  I will never complain about it again.  I may have to fill out endless paperwork but I don't use evaluators.  My state cannot complain about what I use for the kids, I just have to make sure I put it down every year.  

bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Jun. 10, 2013 at 5:01 PM

 I'm going to imbed my answers, hope that's okay!

Quoting celticdragon77:

Yes, I deleted that, I kind of got side tracked with that. But yeah, I recently had a meeting with the school and everything they said contradicted the homeschooling laws. 

Why is your school having a meeting with you? In the past, I just sign a log stating I was there and dropped off my portfolio - and the secretary calls someone out to take my portfolio. No one talks to me at all. Even if there is an issue, I get a letter. Just a heads up type letter to inform me that they prefer this or that or that some things are "objectional".

Well I really think it's to give our homeschool director something to do since they are required to hire one (our school district now has a homeschooling population reaching 9% of the school aged kids).  Also it is probably a tactic to get us back in the public school fold.  I'm uncomortable with it, but not enough to hire a lawyer yet.

It's a half hour meeting scheduled for June 25th.  We'll need to bring our portfolio, our affadavit for next year, our objectives for next year, a letter from our evaluator, and a copy of the textbooks we plan to use for next year.  She said that these wouldn't need to be "all of the books" and that we can still change our minds, but she wanted to see what we basically intended to use.  Last year I intended to use K12 for this year, so she only kept me a few minutes.  This year I'll bet it's longer!

Who knows what this year will be like tho. Their threat to send the homeschool director out to my house to supervise and monitor us was ridiculous, but is worrisome about what it will be like to deal with the public schools. Even MORE odd, is that I told them in that same meeting, that the kids would be in a different school district next year. So why they were threatening to send THEIR "homeschool director" is even more ridiculous. Also, the school district does not have a "homeschool director" persay. It is the director of education - or something like that. He has a way more important job duties than to sit at my house all day and watch us do school.

By LAW the school has to give me their curriculum and materials that are grade level. They said they didn't have to. I reminded them that it was not only the law to do so - but they ALSO would have to allow a homeschooler to participate in extra curricular activities. It is worrisome that some of this scare tactics might work on a new homeschooler who do not know the laws.

Yes, they are required by law!  I will not use their stuff because I really do not want them involved in our family anymore.  They called the truancy officer on me when I pulled my oldest out of their school.  I'm sure it works on many new homeschoolers.  I know that I was scared at first, they sent the truancy officer to my door (twice!!)  and then called Child Services.  Thankfully I sent my first affadavit as a registered letter so I had proof that they received it.

I tried K12 my very first year, and found more red tape with that, than just homeschooling on my own. I do not like state testing, and they did it every year. I worked 1st shift at that time and they said we could do school around my schedule. That ended up not being entirely true! They had to be logged in by a certain time in the morning and certain online classes or scheduled (and of course during the day - which I do understand). It had SO much busy work! I was told by one of the kids teachers, that it wasn't expected that a child do all of it. That they are offering as much or as little as a child might need - and incorporating all learning styles. So we began cherry picking and supplementing. I ended up in trouble for that. By the end of the year, I was ready to just homeschool on my own. 

I thought K12 was required to transfer records to another school?! 

They are only required to transfer the report card and any state test scores.  They wanted copies of all of the worksheets, quizzes, etc.  K12 and I went rounds about our asynchronous status.  My sons were far ahead in their lessons, but they missed the cutoff for asynchronous status so they were going to be required to sit in those class connect sessions for lessons they had finished months before.  I pulled them in February and so I needed 74 days of homeschooling curriculum.  I just wanted to use the time to bolster their problem areas and finish anything that we hadn't covered during their time in K12, so we didn't purchase a Math curriculum for a few weeks.  We just covered more fractions, time, money, and decimals until we bought Math U See.  I wanted time to find a good fit for us.  But this evaluator has never heard of Math U See.  She kept asking if that was an online program.  I think she really wanted me to bring all of my textbooks.  So I wonder if that's okay by law for her to ask for it?  She seemed to be hinting without coming out and saying "you need to bring me the textbooks so I can okay it."

 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 Sorry, I should have explained the DIBELS test.  My first son scored higher than the ending score for the dibels in the beginning of his 1st grade year.  When I asked what their goals for him were their answer was that he would probably improve over the year.  So I asked them aside from the dibels test what were their goals for him and their answer was that he was doing very well and he would probably improve in all areas over the year.  Seriously?  He would "probably improve"? 

I think if your school uses the DRA they do not use the dibels, but I'm not positive about that.

Somehow some of your quote disappeared.  You said something about how the school was contrary to the homeschooling laws.  Ours has been very against our homeschooling.  It's been a difficult run.  I tried using K12 to get away from them, but I hated k12 so badly that I'm willing to try again.  But it looks to be the same problems.  They won't count days before August 1st, but they want a meeting and to receive my affadavit at the meeting at the end of June.  We are year-rounders so we will have far more than enough days next year, but it is aggrivating when they are physically crossing off days on our calendar in front of my kids (last year).  Then this year they want an accounting of what the kids did with k12.  Iasked them if they would expect a parent who had moved here from another school to have kept all of the information from that other public school and bring it in to this one?  Of course they thought that was silly, but requesting it from me was just fine. 

Sorry, anyway, it's just as frustrating this time around.

Quoting celticdragon77:

I agree with you about full box curriculums!

I went and researched Dibels. I had heard of it, but never looked into it. I have never heard it mentioned by my kids school. I hear more about the DRA for measure of reading. I found it VERY interesting, what the criticism was of the Dibels. How would I know if my school uses this assessment?

I know, ask, but my school is VERY guarded for some reason with information. BY LAW, they HAVE to give me a curriculum outline for the year - they won't. BY LAW, they have to give me grade level materials - they won't. I have not pushed the issue, and won't. I have asked various information regarding the kids and I get stone walled.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 I do not think I'll be using her next year, if I can get out of it without causing some kind of stir in the church.  Although maybe next year will be different because I'll be doing the entire 180 days, so my book log will be longer and I'll go ahead and put the DORA report in.  It took us an hour with her, granted there were 2 kids.  I saw the lady before me and her binder was 6inches plus she brought in all of her textbooks.  It was quite a balancing act.

I'm more for following the law to the letter, so this doesn't feel right to me.  Especially because I don't want a full box curriculum.  I like choosing what's right for the kiddos.

Also we left the public school partly because of the DIBELS testing, so for her to test them that way anyhow, just seems counter-intuitive.

Quoting celticdragon77:

I am in Pennsylvania.

My first year homeschooling (my 6th grade child), I had a 2" binder FULL of samples AND a cdrom of pictures. I was told to take some out by the evaluator. Then I handed it into the school and received a letter saying that they were getting "too much" from homeschoolers and had to set a limit. 

Ever since then, I just give them a flash drive. I scan everything into the computer and drag it into the flashdrive at the end of the year. 

My kids were never formally tested by the evaluator. However, they DO need to make sure learning took place. So they can talk to your child and ask questions. Our evaluator just asked them what they learned concerning specific topics that she saw in our portfolio. It was a short conversation - maybe fifteen minutes. She also asked my daughter to start thinking about college and high school. She discussed what my daughters options were as a homeschooler. Our evaulator was VERY supportive and knowledgable about the homeschooling community in our area. She was a teacher that homeschooled her own three kids.

My evaulator and my school district were not supportive of me using Sonlight. When my portfolio was returned to me, there were even markings on some of the books off the reading list - all of them were Sonlight books. The evaluator mentioned to me that she did not like what we had for Sonlight, in our portfolio. She also warned me that the school district might make mention of it too. Sure enough, a letter stated that some of the materials used were "objectional".

I used the Eastern Hemisphere one, of Sonlight. I had to heavily supplement it. It appeared to mainly be about missionarys going over to convert people of that area of the world. My daughter was in 6th grade at the time and did the work mainly on her own. So, I did not entirely know what was being covered. My daughter INSISTED she was learning a lot. By the end of the year, she wanted to be a missionary!  

It all depends on what YOU are looking for. I personally agreed with my evaluator and school district on the issue of Sonlight, so it was no big deal. Some parents would like someone to test their child - others would not. Some people like to hand in loads of stuff into the school (or think they have to - like I did at first) - others do not. You have to find an evaluator that best suits you. 

Your evaluators expectations are NOT the legal expectation or requirement. 

 


 


 

bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Jun. 10, 2013 at 5:05 PM

 

Quoting luvcats406:

Wow, and I thought my state(NY) was strict.  I will never complain about it again.  I may have to fill out endless paperwork but I don't use evaluators.  My state cannot complain about what I use for the kids, I just have to make sure I put it down every year.  

 I really thought ours weren't allowed to complain about what we used.  That's why I posted.  I'd like some advice about whether they are overstepping.  IMO, they are being picky and crossing the line.  Think I may have to get a lawyer, bleh!  Not a fan of HSDLA, so not sure what I'll do yet.  Might wait to see if they deny me or what their next step is.

celticdragon77
by on Jun. 10, 2013 at 5:22 PM

WOW, the school AND the Evaluator are WAY over stepping their boundaries. If 9% of their community is homeschooling AND allowing this - that is even more concerning!!

The school is NOT allowed to sit and talk to you about anything. They also can not require you to bring in next years objectives. They can't even "approve" (or not approve) a homeschooler based on what they "plan" on doing or using for the coming school year. They need to follow the state laws!!! 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 I'm going to imbed my answers, hope that's okay!

Quoting celticdragon77:

Yes, I deleted that, I kind of got side tracked with that. But yeah, I recently had a meeting with the school and everything they said contradicted the homeschooling laws. 

Why is your school having a meeting with you? In the past, I just sign a log stating I was there and dropped off my portfolio - and the secretary calls someone out to take my portfolio. No one talks to me at all. Even if there is an issue, I get a letter. Just a heads up type letter to inform me that they prefer this or that or that some things are "objectional".

Well I really think it's to give our homeschool director something to do since they are required to hire one (our school district now has a homeschooling population reaching 9% of the school aged kids).  Also it is probably a tactic to get us back in the public school fold.  I'm uncomortable with it, but not enough to hire a lawyer yet.

It's a half hour meeting scheduled for June 25th.  We'll need to bring our portfolio, our affadavit for next year, our objectives for next year, a letter from our evaluator, and a copy of the textbooks we plan to use for next year.  She said that these wouldn't need to be "all of the books" and that we can still change our minds, but she wanted to see what we basically intended to use.  Last year I intended to use K12 for this year, so she only kept me a few minutes.  This year I'll bet it's longer!

Who knows what this year will be like tho. Their threat to send the homeschool director out to my house to supervise and monitor us was ridiculous, but is worrisome about what it will be like to deal with the public schools. Even MORE odd, is that I told them in that same meeting, that the kids would be in a different school district next year. So why they were threatening to send THEIR "homeschool director" is even more ridiculous. Also, the school district does not have a "homeschool director" persay. It is the director of education - or something like that. He has a way more important job duties than to sit at my house all day and watch us do school.

By LAW the school has to give me their curriculum and materials that are grade level. They said they didn't have to. I reminded them that it was not only the law to do so - but they ALSO would have to allow a homeschooler to participate in extra curricular activities. It is worrisome that some of this scare tactics might work on a new homeschooler who do not know the laws.

Yes, they are required by law!  I will not use their stuff because I really do not want them involved in our family anymore.  They called the truancy officer on me when I pulled my oldest out of their school.  I'm sure it works on many new homeschoolers.  I know that I was scared at first, they sent the truancy officer to my door (twice!!)  and then called Child Services.  Thankfully I sent my first affadavit as a registered letter so I had proof that they received it.

I tried K12 my very first year, and found more red tape with that, than just homeschooling on my own. I do not like state testing, and they did it every year. I worked 1st shift at that time and they said we could do school around my schedule. That ended up not being entirely true! They had to be logged in by a certain time in the morning and certain online classes or scheduled (and of course during the day - which I do understand). It had SO much busy work! I was told by one of the kids teachers, that it wasn't expected that a child do all of it. That they are offering as much or as little as a child might need - and incorporating all learning styles. So we began cherry picking and supplementing. I ended up in trouble for that. By the end of the year, I was ready to just homeschool on my own. 

I thought K12 was required to transfer records to another school?! 

They are only required to transfer the report card and any state test scores.  They wanted copies of all of the worksheets, quizzes, etc.  K12 and I went rounds about our asynchronous status.  My sons were far ahead in their lessons, but they missed the cutoff for asynchronous status so they were going to be required to sit in those class connect sessions for lessons they had finished months before.  I pulled them in February and so I needed 74 days of homeschooling curriculum.  I just wanted to use the time to bolster their problem areas and finish anything that we hadn't covered during their time in K12, so we didn't purchase a Math curriculum for a few weeks.  We just covered more fractions, time, money, and decimals until we bought Math U See.  I wanted time to find a good fit for us.  But this evaluator has never heard of Math U See.  She kept asking if that was an online program.  I think she really wanted me to bring all of my textbooks.  So I wonder if that's okay by law for her to ask for it?  She seemed to be hinting without coming out and saying "you need to bring me the textbooks so I can okay it."

 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 

Quoting celticdragon77:


Quoting bluerooffarm:


 


 


 


bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Jun. 10, 2013 at 5:26 PM

 Crap.  I was afraid I was going to need a lawyer.  Well, thanks for confirming it.  Off to research homeschooling lawyers (not HSDLA) in Pennsylvania.

Quoting celticdragon77:

WOW, the school AND the Evaluator are WAY over stepping their boundaries. If 9% of their community is homeschooling AND allowing this - that is even more concerning!!

The school is NOT allowed to sit and talk to you about anything. They also can not require you to bring in next years objectives. They can't even "approve" (or not approve) a homeschooler based on what they "plan" on doing or using for the coming school year. They need to follow the state laws!!! 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 I'm going to imbed my answers, hope that's okay!

Quoting celticdragon77:

Yes, I deleted that, I kind of got side tracked with that. But yeah, I recently had a meeting with the school and everything they said contradicted the homeschooling laws. 

Why is your school having a meeting with you? In the past, I just sign a log stating I was there and dropped off my portfolio - and the secretary calls someone out to take my portfolio. No one talks to me at all. Even if there is an issue, I get a letter. Just a heads up type letter to inform me that they prefer this or that or that some things are "objectional".

Well I really think it's to give our homeschool director something to do since they are required to hire one (our school district now has a homeschooling population reaching 9% of the school aged kids).  Also it is probably a tactic to get us back in the public school fold.  I'm uncomortable with it, but not enough to hire a lawyer yet.

It's a half hour meeting scheduled for June 25th.  We'll need to bring our portfolio, our affadavit for next year, our objectives for next year, a letter from our evaluator, and a copy of the textbooks we plan to use for next year.  She said that these wouldn't need to be "all of the books" and that we can still change our minds, but she wanted to see what we basically intended to use.  Last year I intended to use K12 for this year, so she only kept me a few minutes.  This year I'll bet it's longer!

Who knows what this year will be like tho. Their threat to send the homeschool director out to my house to supervise and monitor us was ridiculous, but is worrisome about what it will be like to deal with the public schools. Even MORE odd, is that I told them in that same meeting, that the kids would be in a different school district next year. So why they were threatening to send THEIR "homeschool director" is even more ridiculous. Also, the school district does not have a "homeschool director" persay. It is the director of education - or something like that. He has a way more important job duties than to sit at my house all day and watch us do school.

By LAW the school has to give me their curriculum and materials that are grade level. They said they didn't have to. I reminded them that it was not only the law to do so - but they ALSO would have to allow a homeschooler to participate in extra curricular activities. It is worrisome that some of this scare tactics might work on a new homeschooler who do not know the laws.

Yes, they are required by law!  I will not use their stuff because I really do not want them involved in our family anymore.  They called the truancy officer on me when I pulled my oldest out of their school.  I'm sure it works on many new homeschoolers.  I know that I was scared at first, they sent the truancy officer to my door (twice!!)  and then called Child Services.  Thankfully I sent my first affadavit as a registered letter so I had proof that they received it.

I tried K12 my very first year, and found more red tape with that, than just homeschooling on my own. I do not like state testing, and they did it every year. I worked 1st shift at that time and they said we could do school around my schedule. That ended up not being entirely true! They had to be logged in by a certain time in the morning and certain online classes or scheduled (and of course during the day - which I do understand). It had SO much busy work! I was told by one of the kids teachers, that it wasn't expected that a child do all of it. That they are offering as much or as little as a child might need - and incorporating all learning styles. So we began cherry picking and supplementing. I ended up in trouble for that. By the end of the year, I was ready to just homeschool on my own. 

I thought K12 was required to transfer records to another school?! 

They are only required to transfer the report card and any state test scores.  They wanted copies of all of the worksheets, quizzes, etc.  K12 and I went rounds about our asynchronous status.  My sons were far ahead in their lessons, but they missed the cutoff for asynchronous status so they were going to be required to sit in those class connect sessions for lessons they had finished months before.  I pulled them in February and so I needed 74 days of homeschooling curriculum.  I just wanted to use the time to bolster their problem areas and finish anything that we hadn't covered during their time in K12, so we didn't purchase a Math curriculum for a few weeks.  We just covered more fractions, time, money, and decimals until we bought Math U See.  I wanted time to find a good fit for us.  But this evaluator has never heard of Math U See.  She kept asking if that was an online program.  I think she really wanted me to bring all of my textbooks.  So I wonder if that's okay by law for her to ask for it?  She seemed to be hinting without coming out and saying "you need to bring me the textbooks so I can okay it."

 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 

Quoting celticdragon77:

 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 

 


 


 


 

celticdragon77
by on Jun. 10, 2013 at 5:34 PM

The evaluator - you can just change. 

The school - you can just bring and do ONLY what is REQUIRED by law. Explaining to them WHAT the LAWS are. Maybe bring in printed documents that outlines the laws.  

But yeah, you might want to look into your legal options incase things become complicated.  

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 Crap.  I was afraid I was going to need a lawyer.  Well, thanks for confirming it.  Off to research homeschooling lawyers (not HSDLA) in Pennsylvania.

Quoting celticdragon77:



 


bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Jun. 10, 2013 at 6:06 PM

 I printed off a copy of the law to take with me and I put a call in to the PDE, never hurts to ask about this meeting and what she has to say about it.

Quoting celticdragon77:

The evaluator - you can just change. 

The school - you can just bring and do ONLY what is REQUIRED by law. Explaining to them WHAT the LAWS are. Maybe bring in printed documents that outlines the laws.  

But yeah, you might want to look into your legal options incase things become complicated.  

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 Crap.  I was afraid I was going to need a lawyer.  Well, thanks for confirming it.  Off to research homeschooling lawyers (not HSDLA) in Pennsylvania.

Quoting celticdragon77:

 


 


 

kirbymom
by Sonja on Jun. 29, 2013 at 5:33 PM
1 mom liked this
If I may add to this discussion.....


If I were either of you, I would print a copy of the homeschool laws, highlight the particular laws that are being overstepped, then point out what steps you have taken to theseover stepped boundaries and send a letter to the local BOE and your state officials of your local district stating very clearly that they are to cease and desist with overstepping the boundaries of the law or the next letter will be from your lawyer.

That should stop them in their tracks. They tired once with us about a month or so ago and we told them what the law states and told them they can not enforce what they were asking from us. That stopped them from asking anything else from us.

It is a shame that anyone would have to be bullied in this way. :(


Quoting bluerooffarm:


romacox
by Silver Member on Jun. 29, 2013 at 6:02 PM

In Florida, we use teacher evaluators, but we have always used one who is also a home educator.  She came recommended by one of  the home school  co-ops in our area.

Bluerooffarm, if you still have your teaching license, you might be able to provide this service for others in PA.

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)