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That scheduling post was a bust. It got off topic and stayed off topic. I didn't get what I was looking for out of it. So I am going to try this one more time. Hopefully, wording it better.

Excuse the typos, I am usually tired when here, and in a hurry.

Does anyone Create or Supplement lesson plans?

IF you do, how do you go about it?

Do you sit down once a year and schedule everything out? Or do you break it down into bits - like once every 3 mths, or every 6wks, or once a week? 

Do you know everything that you will use, read and do? 

How do you leave room for things that take longer or something you come across that you want to fit into the schedule? 

I have a very restricted amount of time that I have in a day to cover materials - so going a little longer in the day is not an option. I have the max amount of weeks - and days in a week that I want to use for "school".

So while I do my scheduling, I am trying to think of how I can leave some extra room, if I need it.

I homeschool 4 hrs a day - 4 days a wk - 45 wks a year. (I work a ft job). 

I was thinking of scheduling Mon-Wed and leaving Thurs open for "extra time" incase something takes longer or the kids and I come across something interesting that wasn't planned. 

 

Live in the sunshine, swim the sea, drink the wild air... Emerson *FIRE DRILL*

by on Jun. 20, 2013 at 9:51 PM
Replies (11-20):
CatFishMom
by on Jun. 21, 2013 at 5:48 PM

Last year I started out at the beginning of the month, making a month's worth of lessons, researching so I knew what books to get from the library and so forth. It was too much, doing all of it, so now I have curriculums Im working with. I told my husband today that since we're officially on 'summer break' now until next September, Im going to sit down this summer and set up plans for Art History and any random unit studies I want to do, and I'll make them loose but for the whole year so I have an idea of what we're working on for the year, but nothing set in stone that I can't adjust per what the curriculums have us doing. (Example-my writing curriculum begins with a poem called 'September'. I would work to keep our fall unit study in line with that time frame, just like the 'Elves' poem, I'll work to keep my winter study in line with that)

I have large index cards, I dont know the size but theyre big, that I write the name of the unit study on-Fall Leaves, Spiders, Bats, whatever, and then list any books and/or projects I want to do during that study. Then I file the cards in a box. I'll be doing the same this summer with artists for art history, and composers for music history-five of each to cover ten months and we'll spend one month on each person, including any art projects or whatever.
I like unit studies, my son gets a lot out of them, and there are certain topics I feel need more emphasis, plus I want to nudge a little harder on 'state specific' things-like last October I did a unit on spiders and emphasized four spiders we have here in FL so he learned to ID black widows, brown recluses and two others. I also allow time for his own interests and will sometimes work on putting together a study on whatever topic hes interested in at the moment. 
I dont like how swiftly our history curriculum pushes through topics, so Im going to work on making them stronger, taking more time per section so he really gets something out of each instead of a quick story, make a craft and then on to a totally new history topic. So, again, more unit studies for me. I'll be using my index cards a LOT this summer but hopefully by fall I'll be well prepared.
I do use a little lesson plan book I got at Target in their dollar section last year but I like the idea of doing it online-I think it would be easier and less time consuming; I started out when he was tiny using a calendar style graph in my word processor and it was easy enough, popping info into the squares.

Sorry I wasnt more helpful in the other post-I honestly couldnt figure out precisely what you were looking for. I hope this was better.

celticdragon77
by on Jun. 21, 2013 at 6:01 PM

Do you have certain goals of what you want to cover in that year? 

Quoting romacox:

How I go about it:  How Children Learn

I create my lesson plans after each lesson.  My objectives change  based on what the children learned. We sometimes move on to new material, or we might stay on a subject for awhile

I am flexible, because sometimes plans change mid stream based on individual needs.  A child may not be grasping something, and I ask questions to see what the missing link is before proceeding on to new material .  Better to be late than to proceed onto  material that is not comprehended.   



Live in the sunshine, swim the sea, drink the wild air... Emerson *FIRE DRILL*

celticdragon77
by on Jun. 21, 2013 at 6:23 PM

I love the idea of index cards. What a fantastic and handy idea.

I also like having some unit studies (like the art history) weaving through the year. Maybe in the future I can do something like that.

I think yesterdays post was just too general. Plus, it got off track by people discussing my state laws hours and such. I know everyone meant well. I was tired and frustrated. Hopefully there are no hard feelings.


Quoting CatFishMom:

Last year I started out at the beginning of the month, making a month's worth of lessons, researching so I knew what books to get from the library and so forth. It was too much, doing all of it, so now I have curriculums Im working with. I told my husband today that since we're officially on 'summer break' now until next September, Im going to sit down this summer and set up plans for Art History and any random unit studies I want to do, and I'll make them loose but for the whole year so I have an idea of what we're working on for the year, but nothing set in stone that I can't adjust per what the curriculums have us doing. (Example-my writing curriculum begins with a poem called 'September'. I would work to keep our fall unit study in line with that time frame, just like the 'Elves' poem, I'll work to keep my winter study in line with that)

I have large index cards, I dont know the size but theyre big, that I write the name of the unit study on-Fall Leaves, Spiders, Bats, whatever, and then list any books and/or projects I want to do during that study. Then I file the cards in a box. I'll be doing the same this summer with artists for art history, and composers for music history-five of each to cover ten months and we'll spend one month on each person, including any art projects or whatever.
I like unit studies, my son gets a lot out of them, and there are certain topics I feel need more emphasis, plus I want to nudge a little harder on 'state specific' things-like last October I did a unit on spiders and emphasized four spiders we have here in FL so he learned to ID black widows, brown recluses and two others. I also allow time for his own interests and will sometimes work on putting together a study on whatever topic hes interested in at the moment. 
I dont like how swiftly our history curriculum pushes through topics, so Im going to work on making them stronger, taking more time per section so he really gets something out of each instead of a quick story, make a craft and then on to a totally new history topic. So, again, more unit studies for me. I'll be using my index cards a LOT this summer but hopefully by fall I'll be well prepared.
I do use a little lesson plan book I got at Target in their dollar section last year but I like the idea of doing it online-I think it would be easier and less time consuming; I started out when he was tiny using a calendar style graph in my word processor and it was easy enough, popping info into the squares.

Sorry I wasnt more helpful in the other post-I honestly couldnt figure out precisely what you were looking for. I hope this was better.


Live in the sunshine, swim the sea, drink the wild air... Emerson *FIRE DRILL*

lucsch
by on Jun. 21, 2013 at 6:40 PM

I already have a day to day schedule from HOD. I supplement it. I use a planner in which I write down the page numbers and book names for each subject for each day. I check them off as we do them. I only do 1-2 weeks at a time, because of holidays, sick days or changes in plans. This way, I can reorganize my plans easily. I cannot see making a plan even a month in advance.

Now, what I do have is an idea of what we will do in a given year. I just don't schedule it. I look to see how many pages we will probably do per day, but I don't write down a set schedule.

Some subjects are pretty easy---do one lesson per day in math, for example.

Sometimes (who am I kidding?) I find I am expecting too much, then I have to prioritize and drop something.

Really, it is one thing to be organized, but I suspect you are nervous and feel you have to plan ahead to help control your feelings about it. Relax. Your kids learning will guide you as you go!

Kids learn---it has little to do with teaching by you. It is like the difference between spoon feeding your kids when they were little and eventually they learn how to feed themselves. In either case, you could only offer it to them. You couldn't make them eat it! The same is with learning versus teaching. Kids will only learn what they are mature enough and ready enough to do. How can you know what they can do one year from now or even 6 months from now?

Example in point, my dd was doing a phonics program and suddenly she just "got" reading. She was reading chapter books when I was supposed to assign, according to my curriculum, picture books. Do I make her do the curriculum, when she no longer needs it? Or, do I recognize her readiness for more advanced reading? See, that just was not predictable.


romacox
by Silver Member on Jun. 22, 2013 at 8:09 AM

Yes, I do, and that comes from grade level requirements (see the article link). However, some children are beyond those requirements, and some are behind.  So I adjust accordingly.  In other words, the child is my focus, not my agenda for them.  A big problem in public schools is they are not child focused.  The test sets the agenda, and it becomes a one size fits all approach which is failing our kids.  The beauty in home school, is that we do not have to duplicate public school

P.S. As a home school workshop leader,  one of the hardest things for parents is letting go of the public school model, and adopting ways that they have never experienced.  That is why home school co-ops are so valuable.  They give parents a way to experience some of the home school methods .  

Quoting celticdragon77:

Do you have certain goals of what you want to cover in that year? 

Quoting romacox:

How I go about it:  How Children Learn

I create my lesson plans after each lesson.  My objectives change  based on what the children learned. We sometimes move on to new material, or we might stay on a subject for awhile

I am flexible, because sometimes plans change mid stream based on individual needs.  A child may not be grasping something, and I ask questions to see what the missing link is before proceeding on to new material .  Better to be late than to proceed onto  material that is not comprehended.   





TJandKarasMom
by Debbie on Jun. 22, 2013 at 8:21 AM
Its my first year, so here is what my plan is...I started by listing goals for each subject for the year. I used donnayoung.com for some of her printable sheets to work through. DH and I decided what we want the kids to learn, after I tried to find some gaps and checked their actual reading levels (which I would try to do with your kids since the school says they are far behind, really try to figure out where they are so you don't waste time planning for the wrong level).

From there, I have only started with history because that's what I have most of what I need for. So I sat with the computer, allinonehomeschool.com open on one page, a word doc open, my library website open, then next to me I had the SOTW book and activity book. I started with the intro, typed "lesson one" and listed what I want them to do (read intro, answer or discuss these questions, and two little projects). I also then looked for a book at the library to go along with it, and listed the supplies I need to get or things I need to prep. After doing that and looking into it more, I realized I can actually spread that out over a week if I want to, though I had intended for it to be a day.

I will plan probably 20 lessons or more for each subject for each kid, but I won't date them. Then each week, I will take a weeks worth of lessons and put them in my planner, whatever we don't get to or don't understand completely or want to work more on can be bumped pretty easy, but I still will have plenty of lessons planned ahead of time.

This makes the most sense to me though I haven't completely put it to practice yet. It just makes sense to have as much planned as I can ahead of time, but still be able to be flexible when the kids need it since that is really the main reason we are homeschooling :)

I hope this went better than your first post, no hard feelings, no one meant to take it in the wrong direction.
celticdragon77
by on Jun. 22, 2013 at 10:57 AM

I have homeschooled in the past. I homeschooled my oldest child. I just prefer to do it a certain way. I just never have actually made lesson plans up before. I did things more on the fly before. She is now 17yrs old and preparing for college. She will end up okay, but there are areas that I now see that she is not prepared enough. There just are various factors and preferences that I have... 

Quoting romacox:

Yes, I do, and that comes from grade level requirements (see the article link). However, some children are beyond those requirements, and some are behind.  So I adjust accordingly.  In other words, the child is my focus, not my agenda for them.  A big problem in public schools is they are not child focused.  The test sets the agenda, and it becomes a one size fits all approach which is failing our kids.  The beauty in home school, is that we do not have to duplicate public school

P.S. As a home school workshop leader,  one of the hardest things for parents is letting go of the public school model, and adopting ways that they have never experienced.  That is why home school co-ops are so valuable.  They give parents a way to experience some of the home school methods .  




Live in the sunshine, swim the sea, drink the wild air... Emerson *FIRE DRILL*

romacox
by Silver Member on Jun. 22, 2013 at 11:54 AM

It sounds like you are well aware of the tests that help you  determine what she needs to learn.  My Grand son is doing Dual Enrollment. Forty two states offer that free until the child turns 18.  Koty is taking his courses on campus at a local community college, but they can take the courses online.

It is an excellent way to prepare them for college, and if they make good grades, it helps with grants and scholarships. 

How Homeschoolers Can Gain Admittance To Top Colleges

ACT Or SAT

College Transcripts  (be sure to read the comment about dual enrollment at the bottom of this article)

Courses For The College Bound

Quoting celticdragon77:

I have homeschooled in the past. I homeschooled my oldest child. I just prefer to do it a certain way. I just never have actually made lesson plans up before. I did things more on the fly before. She is now 17yrs old and preparing for college. She will end up okay, but there are areas that I now see that she is not prepared enough. There just are various factors and preferences that I have... 

Quoting romacox:

Yes, I do, and that comes from grade level requirements (see the article link). However, some children are beyond those requirements, and some are behind.  So I adjust accordingly.  In other words, the child is my focus, not my agenda for them.  A big problem in public schools is they are not child focused.  The test sets the agenda, and it becomes a one size fits all approach which is failing our kids.  The beauty in home school, is that we do not have to duplicate public school

P.S. As a home school workshop leader,  one of the hardest things for parents is letting go of the public school model, and adopting ways that they have never experienced.  That is why home school co-ops are so valuable.  They give parents a way to experience some of the home school methods .  






Bleacheddecay
by Bronze Member on Jun. 22, 2013 at 2:53 PM

Does anyone Create or Supplement lesson plans?

I have in the past. Generally I use curriculum in a way that works for me and my kids. Sometimes my kids and/or I also make up a study plan for a subject.


IF you do, how do you go about it?

For instance in Write With the Best, we found it repetitive, one of top peaves and the way they did the parts of speech termnolgy wise made no sense to us. So we cut down on the repitions and used our own terms instead.

In Math U See we cut down on the problems my dyscaclia issues son had to do. We sought masstery of a concept rather than busy work.

In another subject my son studies how video games were first made, computer languages and made his own video game during one year.

Meanwhile my girl studied movies and movie making. She wrote a script but never quite filmed her concept. In college she got to make a short movie.

Do you sit down once a year and schedule everything out? Or do you break it down into bits - like once every 3 mths, or every 6wks, or once a week?

I used to sit down once a year and do it but as soon as the kids were old enough I had them do it so they would see how much work had to get cone and why. I would give them the calendar. I would tell them the cut off date, (two weeks before testing.) and have them schedule the work.

I ordered all or nearly all materials the last six weeks or so of the year after test was over. I had my kids look over materials with me and help pick them out. However sometimes materials STILL didn't work for us and we would have to devise another way to study something, preferably with free resources.

As they grew older they often worked ahead and they became more idependent so they could ask me for help but usually didn't need to. Therefore there was no reason for me to keep much of a schedule. I did have them turn in all work Thursday by 5 p.m. So I had time to keep records. Otherwise they could do work at 2 a.m. if they liked as long as it got done, they didn't wake anyone, did good work and kept a good attitude.

Do you know everything that you will use, read and do?

You never know everything. You have to stay flexible.

How do you leave room for things that take longer or something you come across that you want to fit into the schedule?

Very often, I am a very busy person. The older the kids got the more they could do independanly. Plus they had activities outside the home often and so did I.


I have a very restricted amount of time that I have in a day to cover materials - so going a little longer in the day is not an option. I have the max amount of weeks - and days in a week that I want to use for "school".


I would just make it fit my schedule and conveniece then let the kids do what they can alone.


So while I do my scheduling, I am trying to think of how I can leave some extra room, if I need it.

I homeschool 4 hrs a day - 4 days a wk - 45 wks a year. (I work a ft job). I was thinking of scheduling Mon-Wed and leaving Thurs open for "extra time" incase something takes longer or the kids and I come across something interesting that wasn't planned.


Sounds good to me.

kirbymom
by Sonja on Jun. 22, 2013 at 4:59 PM
Instead of trying to add in supplemental as school lessons, try finding ways yiou can make them gams of a sort for our days where you can just play and relax? Kids are more likely to pick up info when hey think it's just a game or where tey know they are not being pushed to learn for teacher's/parent's objectives. ???
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