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college....

Posted by on Jun. 25, 2013 at 12:24 AM
  • 16 Replies

I have been watching videos about college. Every aspect. The critics that think college is a scam, the lectures, prfessors complaining about students, students complaining about professors, and yadda yadda... 

So anyways, it all just has me thinking and I wonder what other homeschoolers think about education, college, life skills, critical / creative thinking...  

Live in the sunshine, swim the sea, drink the wild air... Emerson *FIRE DRILL*

by on Jun. 25, 2013 at 12:24 AM
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Replies (1-10):
SusanTheWriter
by Bronze Member on Jun. 25, 2013 at 4:15 AM
1 mom liked this

I think that a lot of people think of college as a sort of trade school. You only go to learn enough to get you a certain kind of job, and if you don't get that kind of job, then college was a waste.

That point of view is incredibly limiting. Those people aren't taking advantage of the wonderful intellectual and cultural diversity of thought and experience that universities can offer. My first degree is, for all practical intents and purposes, "useless." I wouldn't trade it for a second. It opened my eyes to cultures and literature and beliefs far beyond what I would have otherwise experienced.

Like all other educational experiences, the best college education doesn't teach you what to think, but *how* to think. The process in/product out view of higher education - from students to faculty and administration - keeps people self-absorbed and thinking small.

I'm constantly trying to get my kids to enlarge their limits, broaden their horizons, think beyond their experiences. Sure, a university education will strengthen their skills and put them in a good spot for the vocation they choose, but if that's all they get out of it, then there's been a serious breakdown.

celticdragon77
by on Jun. 25, 2013 at 4:51 AM

I am at this point just reflecting upon the topic. I knew some people felt that college was a waste of money, but I never realized just how wide spread that idea really was. I am very curious to hear all kinds of ideas about this. 

The debate that I am hearing is that college is expensive just for the purpose of meeting / engaging with intellectual minds, exposing yourself to broader experience of ideas, or to explore knowledge in of itself... because these are things that could be done outside of college for much cheaper. That all that money does not guarantee you anything except debt. That it is NOT the appropriate or only goal that we should be trying to sell to children / parents. 

Quoting SusanTheWriter:

I think that a lot of people think of college as a sort of trade school. You only go to learn enough to get you a certain kind of job, and if you don't get that kind of job, then college was a waste.

That point of view is incredibly limiting. Those people aren't taking advantage of the wonderful intellectual and cultural diversity of thought and experience that universities can offer. My first degree is, for all practical intents and purposes, "useless." I wouldn't trade it for a second. It opened my eyes to cultures and literature and beliefs far beyond what I would have otherwise experienced.

Like all other educational experiences, the best college education doesn't teach you what to think, but *how* to think. The process in/product out view of higher education - from students to faculty and administration - keeps people self-absorbed and thinking small.

I'm constantly trying to get my kids to enlarge their limits, broaden their horizons, think beyond their experiences. Sure, a university education will strengthen their skills and put them in a good spot for the vocation they choose, but if that's all they get out of it, then there's been a serious breakdown.


Live in the sunshine, swim the sea, drink the wild air... Emerson *FIRE DRILL*

mylovey
by on Jun. 25, 2013 at 9:38 AM

You put into words my thoughts pertaining to higher learning.

Quoting SusanTheWriter:

I think that a lot of people think of college as a sort of trade school. You only go to learn enough to get you a certain kind of job, and if you don't get that kind of job, then college was a waste.

That point of view is incredibly limiting. Those people aren't taking advantage of the wonderful intellectual and cultural diversity of thought and experience that universities can offer. My first degree is, for all practical intents and purposes, "useless." I wouldn't trade it for a second. It opened my eyes to cultures and literature and beliefs far beyond what I would have otherwise experienced.

Like all other educational experiences, the best college education doesn't teach you what to think, but *how* to think. The process in/product out view of higher education - from students to faculty and administration - keeps people self-absorbed and thinking small.

I'm constantly trying to get my kids to enlarge their limits, broaden their horizons, think beyond their experiences. Sure, a university education will strengthen their skills and put them in a good spot for the vocation they choose, but if that's all they get out of it, then there's been a serious breakdown.


Dawn07
by Bronze Member on Jun. 25, 2013 at 10:09 AM
1 mom liked this
I have mixed feelings on college. There are times I wish I could have gone to college and had that experience. Yet on the other hand I see other adults the same age being set back because of their college debt, they paid high prices for knowledge that I have managed to learn on my own without putting myself in debt. My husband has found that in his field of work he has experience the equivalent of a masters but without the debt, and his employers would rather the experience over the diploma.
I think it all depends on the vocation, what's available, and what is required.
When my children get to highschool we will discuss all options.
mommy4lyf
by on Jun. 25, 2013 at 10:27 AM

In my opinion. You pay a lot of money to learn skills (college). There are skills that you can learn without spending too much money and I call it experience.

"If the child cannot learn in the way we teach...we must teach in the way the child can learn."reading

celticdragon77
by on Jun. 25, 2013 at 10:48 AM
2 moms liked this

I have seen so many people do great things without diplomas, but I have also seen people hindered by the lack of one. 

A relative of mine started work at Walmart back in the late 80s/early 90s. They started with unloading trucks, then moved to being a dept. mgnr., then were trained to be an asst mgnr, then became a personnel mgnr. 

They did all that within a few years. She stayed at WalMart until 2012, when she retired. She says that at some point while working there, WalMart capped what each job could earn a person. She had no college education, so she capped at a certain amount. They took away her earned raises and such, because of this new policy. No matter how well she ever did her job, she would never be able to earn any more money. 

She had loved her job and had been the most diehard loyal company employee. She ended resentful and hating her job until the day she retired. 

Most WalMarts in our area were smaller than hers and had asst's to the personnel mgnrs. She was able to her job with no asst's. She saved the company money because of her experience and ability to the job well and effectively. But what REALLY ended up mattering was that she didn't have classroom hours at some college many years ago in her life. 

On no level does that make a lick of sense to me.

Yes degrees are good for certain careers, but not for all of them.

These are the kinds of stories I think of. I know so many people who thought outside the box, were very smart... some are limited without the degree and others found ways to work around it. 

My husband that I am separated with - makes $50,000 without a college education. I make $30,000 without one. If I would have gone to college, I would have wanted to be a social worker - I would be making the same (or less), have to work more hours, have more stress, and be in debt. 

An old friend of mine dropped out of high school to take a good paying job that his uncle got him. He had all expenses paid (including a company truck) to travel all around Pa to do work with billboards. He did construction on the side. He took the skills from construction - and his money, to buy some houses to fix up and rent out and/or sell. He eventually was able to quit the jobs and basically retire by just living off the properties. He is in his late 30's. His wife is a nurse. 

Another family members wife went to college for accounting. Worked at a bank for awhile. Was able to land a good job (the job is not in any way related to her degree). Her husband has no college degree and tried to get a job where she works. He was denied because he didn't have the degree. BUT, the company wishes they could hire him, and pay him to come at times to problem solve issues when they are unable to. Though to be fair, that guy never graduated from high school because he was "bored" and has an IQ that qualifies him as a genius. So works on a farm and makes art... because he claims that "the world deems him useless without a piece of paper, and that is their loss."

So, it all makes me wonder about our ideas about education.


Live in the sunshine, swim the sea, drink the wild air... Emerson *FIRE DRILL*

Cemommster
by Jenny on Jun. 25, 2013 at 12:19 PM

I have two degrees and we are encouraging our high schooler to continue with college when he is done.

 

Bleacheddecay
by Bronze Member on Jun. 25, 2013 at 12:35 PM

I agree. Sadly, I think one of the reasons many homeschoolers are against college is because it does open their kids up to new ideas and ways of life. That scares them unless it's a religious college.


Quoting SusanTheWriter:

I think that a lot of people think of college as a sort of trade school. You only go to learn enough to get you a certain kind of job, and if you don't get that kind of job, then college was a waste.

That point of view is incredibly limiting. Those people aren't taking advantage of the wonderful intellectual and cultural diversity of thought and experience that universities can offer. My first degree is, for all practical intents and purposes, "useless." I wouldn't trade it for a second. It opened my eyes to cultures and literature and beliefs far beyond what I would have otherwise experienced.

Like all other educational experiences, the best college education doesn't teach you what to think, but *how* to think. The process in/product out view of higher education - from students to faculty and administration - keeps people self-absorbed and thinking small.

I'm constantly trying to get my kids to enlarge their limits, broaden their horizons, think beyond their experiences. Sure, a university education will strengthen their skills and put them in a good spot for the vocation they choose, but if that's all they get out of it, then there's been a serious breakdown.



Bleacheddecay
by Bronze Member on Jun. 25, 2013 at 12:37 PM

We saved for college. Not enough but we did try. Our kids got scholarships and grants. It has not put them or us in debt and it won't do so. I don't know why so many are willing to go into debt. Personally if I had to, I would work my way through rather than go into debt.

Of course I dropped out after three years but yeah. LOL

Quoting celticdragon77:

I am at this point just reflecting upon the topic. I knew some people felt that college was a waste of money, but I never realized just how wide spread that idea really was. I am very curious to hear all kinds of ideas about this. 

The debate that I am hearing is that college is expensive just for the purpose of meeting / engaging with intellectual minds, exposing yourself to broader experience of ideas, or to explore knowledge in of itself... because these are things that could be done outside of college for much cheaper. That all that money does not guarantee you anything except debt. That it is NOT the appropriate or only goal that we should be trying to sell to children / parents. 

Quoting SusanTheWriter:

I think that a lot of people think of college as a sort of trade school. You only go to learn enough to get you a certain kind of job, and if you don't get that kind of job, then college was a waste.

That point of view is incredibly limiting. Those people aren't taking advantage of the wonderful intellectual and cultural diversity of thought and experience that universities can offer. My first degree is, for all practical intents and purposes, "useless." I wouldn't trade it for a second. It opened my eyes to cultures and literature and beliefs far beyond what I would have otherwise experienced.

Like all other educational experiences, the best college education doesn't teach you what to think, but *how* to think. The process in/product out view of higher education - from students to faculty and administration - keeps people self-absorbed and thinking small.

I'm constantly trying to get my kids to enlarge their limits, broaden their horizons, think beyond their experiences. Sure, a university education will strengthen their skills and put them in a good spot for the vocation they choose, but if that's all they get out of it, then there's been a serious breakdown.




Bleacheddecay
by Bronze Member on Jun. 25, 2013 at 12:40 PM

I do agree that too many jobs "require" a college degree for no real useful reason.

Quoting celticdragon77:

I have seen so many people do great things without diplomas, but I have also seen people hindered by the lack of one. 

A relative of mine started work at Walmart back in the late 80s/early 90s. They started with unloading trucks, then moved to being a dept. mgnr., then were trained to be an asst mgnr, then became a personnel mgnr. 

They did all that within a few years. She stayed at WalMart until 2012, when she retired. She says that at some point while working there, WalMart capped what each job could earn a person. She had no college education, so she capped at a certain amount. They took away her earned raises and such, because of this new policy. No matter how well she ever did her job, she would never be able to earn any more money. 

She had loved her job and had been the most diehard loyal company employee. She ended resentful and hating her job until the day she retired. 

Most WalMarts in our area were smaller than hers and had asst's to the personnel mgnrs. She was able to her job with no asst's. She saved the company money because of her experience and ability to the job well and effectively. But what REALLY ended up mattering was that she didn't have classroom hours at some college many years ago in her life. 

On no level does that make a lick of sense to me.

Yes degrees are good for certain careers, but not for all of them.

These are the kinds of stories I think of. I know so many people who thought outside the box, were very smart... some are limited without the degree and others found ways to work around it. 

My husband that I am separated with - makes $50,000 without a college education. I make $30,000 without one. If I would have gone to college, I would have wanted to be a social worker - I would be making the same (or less), have to work more hours, have more stress, and be in debt. 

An old friend of mine dropped out of high school to take a good paying job that his uncle got him. He had all expenses paid (including a company truck) to travel all around Pa to do work with billboards. He did construction on the side. He took the skills from construction - and his money, to buy some houses to fix up and rent out and/or sell. He eventually was able to quit the jobs and basically retire by just living off the properties. He is in his late 30's. His wife is a nurse. 

Another family members wife went to college for accounting. Worked at a bank for awhile. Was able to land a good job (the job is not in any way related to her degree). Her husband has no college degree and tried to get a job where she works. He was denied because he didn't have the degree. BUT, the company wishes they could hire him, and pay him to come at times to problem solve issues when they are unable to. Though to be fair, that guy never graduated from high school because he was "bored" and has an IQ that qualifies him as a genius. So works on a farm and makes art... because he claims that "the world deems him useless without a piece of paper, and that is their loss."

So, it all makes me wonder about our ideas about education.




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You must be a member to reply to this post.
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