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Live in the sunshine, swim the sea, drink the wild air... Emerson *FIRE DRILL*

by on Jun. 25, 2013 at 3:45 AM
Replies (11-20):
bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Jun. 25, 2013 at 3:26 PM

 I like hearing others' perspectives as well.  And since I have been thinking about going back for nutrition, college has been on my mind lately.

I would like to teach people about nutrition and how to eat healthy while on a budget. But realistically, who is going to want to listen to someone who doesn't have a degree in it?  I have read many books on it (love Marion Nestle!!)  but they'll want to see that paper.

Quoting celticdragon77:

I enjoyed reading it. I like hearing various perspectives. It is an interesting topic to me. One I thought about all night at work. 

I know I wasn't "college material". I LOVE to learn. Hell, I once learned ALL about nucleaur power plants - every aspect. even down to how they operated. That was one of my more quirky interests. But I have learning disabilities and a poor memory. I would never survive in a college environment. Plus, now I am 35yrs old and too far down my chosen paths of life. 

My oldest wants desperately to go to college. She wants to be book smart, but doesn't usually want to take the time for it. She has other priorities. She wants to go to college. I asked her why, and she said to get a good job. I asked what she wants to be, and she doesn't know. She changes her mind based on who is currently influencing her. She wants a job that will pay well and be there always. I have suggested the nursing field. She used to have an interest in the medical field - she want to be a vet or a doctor. She is also all into nutrition. It is reliable in demand work, pays decently, and she can invest how much education and work she wants to put into it.

My younger two... Mys son, he is very bright and discplined. He is very analytical and hands on (he gets that very strong, in both sides of his family). He is more studious at school than at home. My youngest daughter, she is very studious at home with me and struggles severely at school. She has the most willingness to learn than all three - and yet, it does not come as easy for her, as it does the other two kids.  

 

quoting bluerooffarm

 Holy Hannah!  Sorry that was so long!!


 

usmom3
by BJ on Jun. 25, 2013 at 4:12 PM

 Bumping for later!

mem82
by Platinum Member on Jun. 25, 2013 at 4:22 PM

I was going to say this...but not as well LOL

Quoting hipmomto3:

The only type of 'college' I'd consider a true rip-off is ITT Tech (& similar brands) that charge exorbitant fees for highly specialized training with false promises of big $ after graduation. I know several people who fell for it, and wind up with $80k in debt for an AS, and no job!

Otherwise, college is very important IMO. You have to be smart about it. A BA in philosophy is never going to get you a job. But the best paying jobs & highest satisfaction jobs require college.


kmath
by Silver Member on Jun. 25, 2013 at 4:29 PM

I think bluerooffarm pretty much said how I feel on the subject.  College isn't for everyone.  I love going, in fact I am getting my second bachelor's now.  I say my first degree was worthless, but that is only from the money standpoint.  I enjoyed college and I learned a lot, just nothing that I want to do for a living.  This degree will be more to help me in my chosen field. 

hwblyf
by Silver Member on Jun. 26, 2013 at 11:00 AM


So this is something I've been thinking about a lot since pulling our oldest out.  He's clearly not on the traditional path, and so college may not be for him, which is something I have to get used to.  I've got my BA and I went to grad school for my education license, am just shy of my master's.  Long line of college in our family, PhDs and the like...I'm having to adjust.  But college isn't for everyone, and not everyone who doesn't have a degreee is "doomed" to having a low paying job, just as not everyone who has a college degree will end up with a high paying job.  Life should be about so much more, but we boil things down to simplify choices.  And that's what a college degree does, it helps employers simplify their choices.  It's a way to make a quick judgment about a person without having to spend significant time evaluating.  Which is why my PhD brother is having a hard time getting a job--he's "overqualified".  College (as home repairs/improvements) should be about YOU and what you want.  Not what someone else will want further down the road.  I loved reading the discussion you two had.  Very well thought out.  :)

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 I like hearing others' perspectives as well.  And since I have been thinking about going back for nutrition, college has been on my mind lately.

I would like to teach people about nutrition and how to eat healthy while on a budget. But realistically, who is going to want to listen to someone who doesn't have a degree in it?  I have read many books on it (love Marion Nestle!!)  but they'll want to see that paper.

Quoting celticdragon77:

I enjoyed reading it. I like hearing various perspectives. It is an interesting topic to me. One I thought about all night at work. 

I know I wasn't "college material". I LOVE to learn. Hell, I once learned ALL about nucleaur power plants - every aspect. even down to how they operated. That was one of my more quirky interests. But I have learning disabilities and a poor memory. I would never survive in a college environment. Plus, now I am 35yrs old and too far down my chosen paths of life. 

My oldest wants desperately to go to college. She wants to be book smart, but doesn't usually want to take the time for it. She has other priorities. She wants to go to college. I asked her why, and she said to get a good job. I asked what she wants to be, and she doesn't know. She changes her mind based on who is currently influencing her. She wants a job that will pay well and be there always. I have suggested the nursing field. She used to have an interest in the medical field - she want to be a vet or a doctor. She is also all into nutrition. It is reliable in demand work, pays decently, and she can invest how much education and work she wants to put into it.

My younger two... Mys son, he is very bright and discplined. He is very analytical and hands on (he gets that very strong, in both sides of his family). He is more studious at school than at home. My youngest daughter, she is very studious at home with me and struggles severely at school. She has the most willingness to learn than all three - and yet, it does not come as easy for her, as it does the other two kids.  

 

quoting bluerooffarm

 Holy Hannah!  Sorry that was so long!!


 



bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Jun. 26, 2013 at 11:22 AM
1 mom liked this
I had to go through that adjustment when I began teaching in the PSS. I found kids who were not going to make it in college. It was a pretty difficult adjustment to make. I felt that if I could just do "something" I could change them in some fundamental way and get them ready for college. But this reprogramming would have broken these kids. They were great kids and I just needed to get over myself. I keep in touch with a few of them that are very successful (mostly in business for themselves). They are actually the ones who reassured me when we decided to go into business for ourselves. Some of them now say that they had already decided that college wasn't for them and are very happy that I stepped in and explained it to their parents. They have much better relationships with their families because of it. I'm not sure how to change the culture to value both sides of this coin: the ones who do not go to college at all and the ones who "go to college too long" and are now "over-qualified" for jobs according to the employers. We really need to have these conversations in the mainstream.
Quoting hwblyf:


So this is something I've been thinking about a lot since pulling our oldest out.  He's clearly not on the traditional path, and so college may not be for him, which is something I have to get used to.  I've got my BA and I went to grad school for my education license, am just shy of my master's.  Long line of college in our family, PhDs and the like...I'm having to adjust.  But college isn't for everyone, and not everyone who doesn't have a degreee is "doomed" to having a low paying job, just as not everyone who has a college degree will end up with a high paying job.  Life should be about so much more, but we boil things down to simplify choices.  And that's what a college degree does, it helps employers simplify their choices.  It's a way to make a quick judgment about a person without having to spend significant time evaluating.  Which is why my PhD brother is having a hard time getting a job--he's "overqualified".  College (as home repairs/improvements) should be about YOU and what you want.  Not what someone else will want further down the road.  I loved reading the discussion you two had.  Very well thought out.  :)

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 I like hearing others' perspectives as well.  And since I have been thinking about going back for nutrition, college has been on my mind lately.

I would like to teach people about nutrition and how to eat healthy while on a budget. But realistically, who is going to want to listen to someone who doesn't have a degree in it?  I have read many books on it (love Marion Nestle!!)  but they'll want to see that paper.

Quoting celticdragon77:

I enjoyed reading it. I like hearing various perspectives. It is an interesting topic to me. One I thought about all night at work. 

I know I wasn't "college material". I LOVE to learn. Hell, I once learned ALL about nucleaur power plants - every aspect. even down to how they operated. That was one of my more quirky interests. But I have learning disabilities and a poor memory. I would never survive in a college environment. Plus, now I am 35yrs old and too far down my chosen paths of life. 

My oldest wants desperately to go to college. She wants to be book smart, but doesn't usually want to take the time for it. She has other priorities. She wants to go to college. I asked her why, and she said to get a good job. I asked what she wants to be, and she doesn't know. She changes her mind based on who is currently influencing her. She wants a job that will pay well and be there always. I have suggested the nursing field. She used to have an interest in the medical field - she want to be a vet or a doctor. She is also all into nutrition. It is reliable in demand work, pays decently, and she can invest how much education and work she wants to put into it.

My younger two... Mys son, he is very bright and discplined. He is very analytical and hands on (he gets that very strong, in both sides of his family). He is more studious at school than at home. My youngest daughter, she is very studious at home with me and struggles severely at school. She has the most willingness to learn than all three - and yet, it does not come as easy for her, as it does the other two kids.  

 

quoting bluerooffarm

 Holy Hannah!  Sorry that was so long!!


 



celticdragon77
by on Jun. 26, 2013 at 3:12 PM

Can someone explain the being "overqualified"?

Is it that people with those degrees want more money and the company's do not want to pay it?

Wouldn't the person eventually just take less pay JUST to at least work while times are tough? Which it would seem they are trying to do if they applied for a specific job.

Which leads back to the employer; why wouln't they want the overqualified person for the lesser money? It seems like a good deal. Or are they afraid they will eventually leave as soon as they find something better?

Sorry if this is a foolish question. I just have never understood it. 

Live in the sunshine, swim the sea, drink the wild air... Emerson 

mrs.hartman12
by on Jun. 26, 2013 at 3:20 PM

College is whatever you go and take out of it. If your going to major in something that you can not possibly get a job in later in life, except to teach said subject its a waste of time. If you go to college for a job that pays so low you will spend most of your life paying back loans, its a waste of time. If you go to college to do something specific and pays well like Doctor, Lawyer, Engineer, Chemist, ect, ect then by all means go for it. We are teaching our children this and also they will be working and starting their college funds when they are old enough to work, because we do not want them taking out loan and if you want something you have to work for it. 

mrs.hartman12
by on Jun. 26, 2013 at 3:22 PM

I understand what you are saying, but from someone who has been on the hiring end, hiring over qualified people is a waste of my time and money because they are general place holders. I want long term employees not employees who are waiting for something better. 


Quoting celticdragon77:

Can someone explain the being "overqualified"?

Is it that people with those degrees want more money and the company's do not want to pay it?

Wouldn't the person eventually just take less pay JUST to at least work while times are tough? Which it would seem they are trying to do if they applied for a specific job.

Which leads back to the employer; why wouln't they want the overqualified person for the lesser money? It seems like a good deal. Or are they afraid they will eventually leave as soon as they find something better?

Sorry if this is a foolish question. I just have never understood it. 



bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Jun. 26, 2013 at 3:25 PM
Quoting celticdragon77:

Can someone explain the being "overqualified"?

Is it that people with those degrees want more money and the company's do not want to pay it?

Wouldn't the person eventually just take less pay JUST to at least work while times are tough? Which it would seem they are trying to do if they applied for a specific job.

Which leads back to the employer; why wouln't they want the overqualified person for the lesser money? It seems like a good deal. Or are they afraid they will eventually leave as soon as they find something better?

Sorry if this is a foolish question. I just have never understood it. 

It's usually not that the person applying wants more money. The employer usually doesn't even give it the chance to get that far. They'd rather not "waste the time" for an interview and just assume that the person is going to ask for too much money. It should be a win-win situation for the employer. You get a very knowledgeable employee for a lower price and the employee gets a job. Even if they only stay for a few months, you'll get that expertise for that time, but they'd rather not even give it the chance. Hubby tried to get a job as an electrician. He had been out of work for a long time and we really needed the money, but because he is also an electrical engineer, they just didn't want to risk it. Really frustrating!!
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