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Live in the sunshine, swim the sea, drink the wild air... Emerson *FIRE DRILL*

by on Jun. 25, 2013 at 3:45 AM
Replies (21-22):
celticdragon77
by on Jun. 26, 2013 at 3:37 PM

It seems to me as well, that hiring the overqualified is to their advantage. It seems foolish to think otherwise. They are obviously there because they have scoured the job market for quite some time and found nothing. They are eager to work, will be appreciative for the job, and have so much more to offer. The likelihood of them leaving anytime real soon is slim. Maybe they are not there for forever, but really, now days, who is?! So you grt more for your money, for awhile - and someone who is grateful to even have a job. They will be a much better employee/investment (odds are anyways). 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

Quoting celticdragon77:

Can someone explain the being "overqualified"?

Is it that people with those degrees want more money and the company's do not want to pay it?

Wouldn't the person eventually just take less pay JUST to at least work while times are tough? Which it would seem they are trying to do if they applied for a specific job.

Which leads back to the employer; why wouln't they want the overqualified person for the lesser money? It seems like a good deal. Or are they afraid they will eventually leave as soon as they find something better?

Sorry if this is a foolish question. I just have never understood it. 

It's usually not that the person applying wants more money. The employer usually doesn't even give it the chance to get that far. They'd rather not "waste the time" for an interview and just assume that the person is going to ask for too much money. It should be a win-win situation for the employer. You get a very knowledgeable employee for a lower price and the employee gets a job. Even if they only stay for a few months, you'll get that expertise for that time, but they'd rather not even give it the chance. Hubby tried to get a job as an electrician. He had been out of work for a long time and we really needed the money, but because he is also an electrical engineer, they just didn't want to risk it. Really frustrating!!


Live in the sunshine, swim the sea, drink the wild air... Emerson 

bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Jun. 26, 2013 at 3:42 PM
Especially in today's market, I cannot understand having that policy!
Quoting celticdragon77:

It seems to me as well, that hiring the overqualified is to their advantage. It seems foolish to think otherwise. They are obviously there because they have scoured the job market for quite some time and found nothing. They are eager to work, will be appreciative for the job, and have so much more to offer. The likelihood of them leaving anytime real soon is slim. Maybe they are not there for forever, but really, now days, who is?! So you grt more for your money, for awhile - and someone who is grateful to even have a job. They will be a much better employee/investment (odds are anyways). 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

Quoting celticdragon77:

Can someone explain the being "overqualified"?

Is it that people with those degrees want more money and the company's do not want to pay it?

Wouldn't the person eventually just take less pay JUST to at least work while times are tough? Which it would seem they are trying to do if they applied for a specific job.

Which leads back to the employer; why wouln't they want the overqualified person for the lesser money? It seems like a good deal. Or are they afraid they will eventually leave as soon as they find something better?

Sorry if this is a foolish question. I just have never understood it. 

It's usually not that the person applying wants more money. The employer usually doesn't even give it the chance to get that far. They'd rather not "waste the time" for an interview and just assume that the person is going to ask for too much money. It should be a win-win situation for the employer. You get a very knowledgeable employee for a lower price and the employee gets a job. Even if they only stay for a few months, you'll get that expertise for that time, but they'd rather not even give it the chance. Hubby tried to get a job as an electrician. He had been out of work for a long time and we really needed the money, but because he is also an electrical engineer, they just didn't want to risk it. Really frustrating!!


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