Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

If you didn't do a letter of the week curriculum what did you do?

Posted by   + Show Post
What did you do with your pre schooler? Theo will be four and mostly we will focus on educational play but I will become a bit more schoolish with him.
by on Jun. 25, 2013 at 9:07 PM
Replies (11-20):
mem82
by Platinum Member on Jun. 26, 2013 at 9:38 AM
I think this, too. I don't know if Theo would pay attention to something so slow. I'm thinking of doing a mix.

Quoting Jinx-Troublex3:

I didn't do letter of the week. We watched leapfrog DVDs, played letter and sound gales and eventually learned them all. LOTW was took slow!
oredeb
by on Jun. 26, 2013 at 10:31 AM

 ohh great review nodiff,  of 'all abot reading', are you going to do the next level with him? what were the cons to the program?

Quoting No_Difference:

 I did the All About Reading Pre Level 1 with my little guy. He loved it. It's like letter of the week, in a sense. You go over lower case letters and upper case letters one at a time. It teaches the name of the letter, first, and then goes through the sounds the letter makes. There's a craft with every letter, and poems with every letter. There were also little games/activities with each lesson. I printed out handwriting practices pages and put them in page protectors to let him trace and practice writing on his own with dry erase marker. He still loves it. I also added in shapes and numbers and it became his "writing binder."  He thought he was super special since he got his own binder lol. I also started using Math U See's Primer. We're easily half way through it, and my little guy is 4 too, and we started all of this last year (he was asking to, otherwise I probably wouldn't have been using such formal stuff).

 

jen2150
by Silver Member on Jun. 26, 2013 at 11:39 AM
I didn't use a curriculum but I did use a few things. I never did letter of the week. I made up my own fun games. My sons learned to count while jumping on the trampoline. I did use weekly reader. They have magazines for preschoolers that my sons loved. I read to him constantly. My older son was in kindergarten so my preschooler would sit and watch and then leave and go play when he wished. We practiced writing on paper and the white board. I used the indented ABC tablets. They really helped my sons writing letters. We did a lot of nature walks for science and experiments as well. When my sons were young we had what we called table time. It was when we did fun workbooks, puzzles, play doh and crafts. It was all child led. It helped to increase their attention span but at a very natural and gradual process.
debramommyof4
by Silver Member on Jun. 26, 2013 at 11:41 AM

 We did Cullen's ABC's though I may use letter of the week this year.

CatFishMom
by on Jun. 26, 2013 at 2:58 PM

My oldest I had a little workbook with letters in the corner and a nursery rhyme for each letter. When he was about one I started showing the the letters, saying their name, reading the poem, and I would do it each morning at meal time for as many days (usually no more than two) as it took for him to remember the NEXT day what the letter was. Then we moved on to the next letter. He knew the alphabet before he turned eighteen months. My little guy is almost two and seems to just be picking them up on his own, somehow. He knows letters I havent taught him yet, it's weird. I did the same book with him for a while but the problem is that he would get fixated on a poem and wouldnt let me change to the next letter so I use books instead, or just write them down when we're playing with chalk or whatever. He seems to pick up a lot from my oldest's (now almost five) phonics lessons, so I guess thats how he knows letters I didnt actually teach. Honestly, for some reason, the concept of a letter of the week bugged me. I have no idea why.

No_Difference
by Silver Member on Jun. 26, 2013 at 3:43 PM

 We did start Level 1, but he started getting bored with it. He can read the words just fine, and there are activities with the lessons (like cut and paste activities where you cut out the words, and paste them to their matching picture, or having a monster eat the words as you read them). He just didn't want to do the fluency sheet. They recommend not continuing on until the child can fluently read through the fluency page since it's a mastery based program. Riley can - he just doesn't want to lol. So I started pairing it with Starfall and that has been working great! It gets the handwriting practice in too then, and so far it's been matching fairly well. If he can fluently read, lets say Zac the Rat, then we move on to the next set of lessons in AAR... There are also books that go with Level 1, and before going onto the next main focus, they read one "chapter" from the book. Very similar to the easy reading of Starfall. (Instead of Zac the Rat, it's a story called Jam with Pam and a Yak). It introduces a few letter sounds at a time, and one vowel sound at a time. Short a was first, along with two ar three consonants, and then each lesson adds a few more so you can start to compile words. Then common words like "the" and the word "a" are introduced as rule breakers they can throw in jail (which there's a card stock sheet with a jail printed on it lol), and the flash card shows a cowboy/sherif with rule breaker labeled on the card. It only took a few times to remind Riley it was "the" and then he remembered that "naughy card" all by hisself lol.  
Level 1 is alot like All About Spelling in the sense that it has different stacks of cards that go in a review and mastered section. The cards for the vowel sounds have little action pictures on them. For instance, "a" has a hand on the card so the child acts out: "cup your hand as if you are holding an apple" because short a makes the sound you hear in apple. We did the Leap Frog/Home Alone way - hands slap the sides of the face and you "scream" - not a real scream lol. You use the letter tiles like in AAS too, but my little guy wasn't a fan of the tiles, but he did like using the letter flash cards to do the same thing lol. Either way, the lesson was accomplished.

So, so far, the only con that I have had with the program -
With the Pre Level, Riley knew his letter sounds already, and we flew through it really really fast because of it, and I don't think he was quite ready for Level 1, but we started anyway...
With Level 1, Riley hasn't been motivated to do the actual reading part where it came to the fluency testing, but otherwise he's had fun with it. After we paired it with StarFall and started taking AAR a little more slowly, he's had even more fun with it. I'm actually amazed at how well the two were fitting together :).

We have taken a break for the summer (swim team takes waaaay too much energy out of all of us lol) but every now and then we go over the flash cards we've done already and he even likes to do that. We make a rhyme game of scattering all the cards around, and he puts them in groups that all rhyme. That way he's still reading but doesn't realize it lol and we can pick up where we left off when we start school work again :).

Quoting oredeb:

 ohh great review nodiff,  of 'all abot reading', are you going to do the next level with him? what were the cons to the program?

Quoting No_Difference:

 I did the All About Reading Pre Level 1 with my little guy. He loved it. It's like letter of the week, in a sense. You go over lower case letters and upper case letters one at a time. It teaches the name of the letter, first, and then goes through the sounds the letter makes. There's a craft with every letter, and poems with every letter. There were also little games/activities with each lesson. I printed out handwriting practices pages and put them in page protectors to let him trace and practice writing on his own with dry erase marker. He still loves it. I also added in shapes and numbers and it became his "writing binder."  He thought he was super special since he got his own binder lol. I also started using Math U See's Primer. We're easily half way through it, and my little guy is 4 too, and we started all of this last year (he was asking to, otherwise I probably wouldn't have been using such formal stuff).

 

 

AlternaTickers - Cool, free Web tickers

AlternaTickers - Cool, free Web tickers
hipmomto3
by Bronze Member on Jun. 26, 2013 at 3:47 PM

We did units sometimes, for a week-ish at a time. Dinosaurs, Fruits & Vegetables, Five Senses, Colors, etc.

Like, if it was dinsosaurs week, we'd get a bunch of library books about it, find a couple of TV shows or documentaries to watch (either free online, Netflix, or rent from library), maybe build dinos out of play-doh one day, dinosaur coloring sheets, dinosaur memory game (print, cut out, cheap). With some we'd do a tie-in field trip, like a week on fruits & vegetables might coincide with a trip to a pick-your-own orchard or family farm... Some units obviously lend themselves more easily to certain types of activities (some there are more art things, some more outdoor things).

PEEK05
by on Jun. 26, 2013 at 4:14 PM
1 mom liked this

I did letter of the week when my daughter was 3.  This year she is 4 turning 5 and we are doing Rod and Staff curriculum. :) She LOVES to do workbook type learning so she is going to have a BLAST!!!!

kirbymom
by Sonja on Jun. 26, 2013 at 4:40 PM
We really didn't do a letter of the week as much as a letter of the day and whenever they wanted to learn. Because of having so many kids, my 2 youngest are almost on the same level as my 2nd grader.
oredeb
by on Jun. 26, 2013 at 4:53 PM
1 mom liked this

 thank you thank you nodiff!! another great review!!! helped me a lot!

Quoting No_Difference:

 We did start Level 1, but he started getting bored with it. He can read the words just fine, and there are activities with the lessons (like cut and paste activities where you cut out the words, and paste them to their matching picture, or having a monster eat the words as you read them). He just didn't want to do the fluency sheet. They recommend not continuing on until the child can fluently read through the fluency page since it's a mastery based program. Riley can - he just doesn't want to lol. So I started pairing it with Starfall and that has been working great! It gets the handwriting practice in too then, and so far it's been matching fairly well. If he can fluently read, lets say Zac the Rat, then we move on to the next set of lessons in AAR... There are also books that go with Level 1, and before going onto the next main focus, they read one "chapter"

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)