Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms
I am a mom of 2 dd and live in nj. Before kids i was a teacher public school teacher in NY. Funny thing is that I do not think I could ever teach my own children!!

We do not home school. We don't know anyone who does as I do not think it is common practice where I live.

So, I was wondering what are your reason for homeschooling?
by on Jul. 1, 2013 at 8:04 AM
Replies (21-30):
Leissaintexas
by Bronze Member on Jul. 1, 2013 at 12:15 PM
1 mom liked this

We homeschool for most of the above reasons. Our area schools are some of the top rated in our state, but that didn't even make a difference when I saw little Kindergartners becoming more sexualized in their behaviour and dress. My children will remain children for a little longer than that , thank you very much. I had a late reader who had absolutely nothing wrong with him other than just not having an interest in learning to read. He was 9 before he learned. Can you imagine how that would have gone over in ps? That poor child would have been tested, diagnosed, and drugged faster than you blink. But you know what? In one year he caught completely up to ohter kids his age. All because I waited till he was ready. Not because someones official timetable said he should. My dd can explore her photography by apprenticing with  a local photography anytime she wants, my ds can work in his dad's shop anytime he wants and is learning job skills. at age 10. My dd is taking a babysitting course and now she is being hired as the jr childcare provider for a group of Classical Conversations families in our area. None of these opportunities would be available to them if we didn't homeschool.

 None of us thought we could teach our own children. Every single one of us has said, more than once, "what have I gotten myself into?" .  We all had reasons to not try to do this.  But we all do it anyway. There is always a way if you want it bad enough.

lucsch
by on Jul. 1, 2013 at 12:21 PM

First, YOU are in charge of the curriculum. Yes, there are many choices for "boxed" curricula, but you don't have to use one.

Second, check the laws in your state. They vary widely, from my state, which only requires attendance of 180 days with absolutely no other guidelines, to other states, which require reporting, testing, and certain subjects taught yearly. You can find the laws for your state here.

All it takes is time, dedication, and determination on your part. Many high school graduates have successfully homeschooled their children into college! You don't have to have mastery of every subject. Some, you learn right along with your child. Others, you can get tutors, online teachers, or DVD teachers for help. Homeschool co-ops often offer classes. Some public schools actually offer part-time enrollment or extra-curricular activities for homeschoolers (ours does).  Homeschooling probably is not what you think it is!

To answer your original question, my prime motivation for homeschooling  was to spend time with my only daughter. I am an older mom--she was born when I was 40--so I feel the need to concentrate our time together. I know that is a bid of a morbid thought!

Well, over these 6 years of homeschooling, there have been so many more reasons added to my original. I do have other kids, two who graduated from public high school and another from private school. They had great educations, but I see the winds of change in morality of which I do not agree. I don't want my daughter exposed to that yet (truth be known-ever--but that's not realistic). I see girls her age dressed like little sluts (sorry for using that word, but it works). I see how she is developing into someone who God meant her to be, someone not afraid to interact with any age, not just her peer group. She is a happy, outgoing young lady.

Academically, I could not be more pleased. Without tests or quizzes, using nontraditional methods, she is above most kids her age in every subject.  We use Heart of Dakota, which is a boxed curriculum, and along with rigorous academics (later--it is very gentle in the younger years) taught in a nontraditional way, its focus is training kids with a heart for Christ. I could not be more pleased with its character training, and we read real living books. The excitement from the authors of these books for a subject is quite contagious!

The biggest hurdle for you is breaking the walls of thinking that learning has to happen in a school building by professionally trained teachers. My dh was a teacher and is now into administration. Yes, he works at a public school, yet he asked me a couple of years ago to continue homeschooling our daughter through high school. He sees what is happening in our public schools and doesn't like it either. It is a change in society which is ruining our schools, unfortunately. That isn't going to be fixed by changing the curriculum. It is rather the case of "you can lead the horse to water but you can't make him drink." You can use all sorts of techniques to teach a kid, but learning won't happen unless the child  wants to learn. Unfortunately, even kids who do want to learn are affected by the other kids who don't. At home, you can taylor the curriculum and teaching styles for each child, making them excited about learning. In the process, you have an intact family, whose outside influences are under your control until your children are mature enough to evaluate the actions of others and not blindly follow them.




kirbymom
by Sonja on Jul. 1, 2013 at 12:30 PM
if ever you have said these words before to your children or at least plan to....you can be anything , do anything, accomplish anything, then you must realize that since your child is 50% you, YOU CAN DO ANYTHING too!

You do NOT need a certifiate or a degree to be able to teach education to your child. Here is a thought you should consider/ponder....
Did you need a certificate or degree to get pregnant or have a baby? No. When you had your baby, did you recieve a Parent's HandBook that has all the rules and whatnots in it telling you HOW to be a parent? NO you didn't. Haven't you been teaching your child how to crawl, walk, talk, brush teeth, make smiley faces, understand what no means, how to put clothes on, know their numbers and colors and abc'cs and how to laaugh and to love and so on and so forth? Of Course you have. You are smarter and more capable than you are giving yourself credit for. The only reason any parent shoulld really ever need or want to homeschool is...Because it is what fits our family best. Everything else is just a moot point, back-up reasons if you will.
jen2150
by Silver Member on Jul. 1, 2013 at 12:42 PM
I have the greatest respect for all the great teachers out there. It is a hard job. I knew from the beginning we were either going to homeschool or send our children to a private school. I didn't want them going to public school. Public school have become too political for my tastes. Teachers and parents are losing control on how they are run. I believe a children's greatest predictor of their success is their parents. I decided that it was easier teaching my children than trying to make sure a teacher was teaching them everything they needed to know. I was told what I had to study and when. In high school I was even told what I couldn't learn. I couldn't take anatomy because I had half of a grade too low in biology. Homeschooling is giving the kind of educations that my children and I absolutely love. I am learning so much and loving it. I have developed a love of math and science that I have never known before. Why don't you feel qualified to teach your children. I am willing to bet you have been teaching them quite well for many years. Homeschooling is not for everyone. It is very different from a traditional school. After 7 years of homeschooling my biggest reason for homeschooling is freedom. I love being able to go where we want, when we want, and being able to design our own curriculum and study the things we love. Homeschooling is so much fun for all of us. I love also running my own co-op and finding classes for my sons to take in the areas that they love.
MacMamaof5
by Member on Jul. 1, 2013 at 2:31 PM
1 mom liked this

We have had bad experiences, yes, but our decision to HS is not out of fear, but the same reason as most.  We CAN teach better.  We know our children and how they learn.  How to get them motivated, how to discipline them, how to reward them, AND the bonus is we CAN HUG.  I don't understand how you think you couldn't teach your own children as you were a PS teacher before?  Is it because you separate their learning from parenting?  That's where I think there needs to be no differences.  I mean, you teach them to walk, how to speak, how to eat; they learn their behaviors from watching you, their culture, mannerisms, beliefs...all that originates from the person they spend the most time with--YOU.  I hope you find the answer you are seeking.  But there is one thing you won't find me doing--lurking about in a public school forum and asking parents why they choose to send their kids to public school when they can homeschool-- unless it's something I was really interested in learning about--without malice.  (No, wasn't saying you have a malicious agenda--but some folks do).  Good luck finding what you are looking for.  Homeschool has no boundaries except for what you make it. 

rosiemarie
by on Jul. 1, 2013 at 3:09 PM
No malicious agenda here....just truly curious


Quoting MacMamaof5:

We have had bad experiences, yes, but our decision to HS is not out of fear, but the same reason as most.  We CAN teach better.  We know our children and how they learn.  How to get them motivated, how to discipline them, how to reward them, AND the bonus is we CAN HUG.  I don't understand how you think you couldn't teach your own children as you were a PS teacher before?  Is it because you separate their learning from parenting?  That's where I think there needs to be no differences.  I mean, you teach them to walk, how to speak, how to eat; they learn their behaviors from watching you, their culture, mannerisms, beliefs...all that originates from the person they spend the most time with--YOU.  I hope you find the answer you are seeking.  But there is one thing you won't find me doing--lurking about in a public school forum and asking parents why they choose to send their kids to public school when they can homeschool-- unless it's something I was really interested in learning about--without malice.  (No, wasn't saying you have a malicious agenda--but some folks do).  Good luck finding what you are looking for.  Homeschool has no boundaries except for what you make it. 


mrs.hartman12
by Member on Jul. 1, 2013 at 3:16 PM

Homeschooling was just something I always knew I would do. My kids are not PS so I have no bad experiences. My PS experience as a child was average. I have developed reasons over the years, but I never had a defining moment, it just seemed natural. 

usmom3
by BJ on Jul. 1, 2013 at 4:57 PM
1 mom liked this
Everything! My children get to be children & learn things that they are interested in when they are interested in it, not just at night & on the weekends. We get to spend time as a family without the schools schedule controlling our time. My children get to learn to be strong independent thinking people that have confidents to stand up for themselves & what they believe in.
Beebella
by on Jul. 2, 2013 at 11:42 AM
To the moms that say their kids were too advanced, did your public schools have gifted and talented programs?
melindabelcher
by Mel on Jul. 2, 2013 at 11:47 AM
We know the way our son learns better then anyone and are willing to make the modifications he needs.
Don't like the public school in our area
Can't afford private school
I was home schooled and I'm very comfortable with home schooling.
Dh and I know hes to smart for public school.
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)