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Dyslexia...

Posted by on Jul. 4, 2013 at 6:45 PM
  • 10 Replies
1 mom liked this

So I am 99% sure DD has dyslexia.  I don't think I would have had any idea to look for it, but my brother has it and I remember how hard things were for him as a kid.  I knew something was off when she was in kindergarten, but DH and I first thought it was hearing related.  She is my stepdaughter and from what I understand dyslexia is hereditary.  DH seems to have a very mild case of it, and has just learned to cope with it and make adjustments.  Which is what we now need to teach her to do.

Here's where I am still sitting here in shock.  She just finished 4th grade.  Every year at the P/T meeting, we bring up the switching of b's and d's and the funky way she writes and speaks sometimes (such as, "I road the bike red." instead of the red bike....there is also a family joke about the mowlawner ie the lawnmower) and every year the teacher seems to brush it off, which was ok in K and 1st, maybe even 2nd grades.  But 4th grade?  She was much too old to be doing that without a reason.

We had a lot of issues with her 3rd grade teacher (and the 4th grade teacher, and the 1st grade teacher).  After that year, the teacher was removed from the classroom and was then a reading specialist.  How did someone qualified to be a reading specialist not even hint that maybe it could be dyslexia??  Am I just expecting too much of the school system?  That maybe one teacher in the 5 years of ps could have mentioned dyslexia?

Anyway...now I have spent hours researching good ways to teach her since I will be the one teaching her and some things we may need to just start at the beginning with.  The dyslexic programs are $200-$300!!!  We just can't afford that, even though we know she is worth every penny, it's just not possible.  So I am trying to just do the research and write my own curriculum.  It's not easy.  So if anyone has any resources or ideas or experience, please share!  I have been reading so much my brain is about to explode.

by on Jul. 4, 2013 at 6:45 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Bleacheddecay
by Bronze Member on Jul. 4, 2013 at 8:41 PM

You might find these links useful.

http://dyslexia.yale.edu/EDU_homeschool.html

http://www.mariannesunderland.com/2012/10/homeschooling-with-dyslexia-get-curriculum/

http://www.thehealthyhomeschool.com/dyslexia

I would HIGHLY recommend POC4U which helped me find curriculum that fit my kid's learning styles better.

http://www.edudps.com/poc4u.html

AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Jul. 4, 2013 at 8:53 PM

Apples and Pears Spelling and Dancing Bears reading (same company does both).

Much more affordable.

I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff: we have traditional gender roles, we're Catholic, I'm Libertarian, he's Republican, we're both conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee














kirbymom
by Sonja on Jul. 4, 2013 at 9:02 PM
My husband and I both grew up dyslexic. I didn't know that it could be dealt with then. My husband found after he was about 17 that learning Greek and Roman math helped him a whole bunch. He has helped me deal with mine and we have taught our kids( since it is heriditary ) how to combat it, using the same advice as the above advice given. My dyslexia is even to the point that I say my words just like your daughter does. My husband is saying that by showing her the way other languages are spelled may make more sense in how words are put together and help her learn American English better. You might also want to look up how the brain works. That is how I was able to help my kids. The way the snapsis of the brain is and the electrical charge and the neurons work and what happens when they are both not working and working. Maybe make a school lesson/game out of it with your daughter. If you do happen to try the Roman math, try learning in the mind first and not on paper. This is also a great way to build up memory and speed. This should help her to become more confident in herself and her abilities.
NYCitymomx3
by Bronze Member on Jul. 5, 2013 at 8:26 AM

Once my 12 y/o ds was diagnosed with visual dyslexia and processing speed issues last summer, I changed how we did his academic work.  Over the last year, he's gone up at least 3 grade levels in reading.  

We never used any dyslexia programs.  I just started where he was but pushed just enough to yield results. Here are some things that worked for him:

  • I read to him often and he narrates back what he remembers.  
  • We "buddy read", where I read a paragraph, then he reads a paragraph.  This method helps with his reading confidence.
  • He sometimes used a blue overlay when he read - it helps many dyslexic kids keep the words lined up better.  After a few months he didn't need it anymore.
  • A lot of his learning comes from a ton of field trips and homeschool group classes.  Hands-on and up-close work really well.  
  • Much of his bookwork is done orally with an open book and ds just telling me the answers rather than him writing things down 
  • He does spelling and math lessons on a big whiteboard and colorful markers.  The different colors helped a lot.
  • He plays Minecraft, has an iPhone, and makes tutorial videos for his youtube channel.  All these things require him to type and read a lot.  He's getting all this reading, writing, and spelling in, and having fun doing it.
  • His 7th grade curriculum, pieced together by me based on his learning style and preferences, will be very simple.  Lightning Lit 7 (a classic literature program with analysis and discussion), Wordly Wise (vocabulary program on grade level), Saxon Algebra 1/2,  K12 Human Odyssey (history that we read together and he narrates), and Apologia General Science (a 7th grade science program with a lot of experiments and a student notebook for him to do some writing). 
  • We do academics 2 hours a day, 4-5 days a week.  Afternoons are free for pursuing interests.
  • He was part of a weekly theater program this year where he learned to confidently "cold read" and memorize lines for a performance. 
  • Games like Trivial Pursuit, Yahtzee, and Monopoly are wonderful for reading and math.
  • Ds loved sight word flash cards when he was 8.  Be creative and make them fun. 
  • And find out what your dd is good at and make it a focus.  Learning happens faster when an interest or passion is mixed in.

Ds seems to truly be overcoming his dyslexia and processing speed issues.  This past year has been amazing and we didn't need to spend a lot of money. My advice is to keep a regular schedule, finish academics before noon so it's not overwhelming and neither of you burn out, and read together a lot.

TJandKarasMom
by Debbie on Jul. 5, 2013 at 6:57 PM
1 mom liked this
Thank you! I had already seen one of these, but will definitely look at the others!


Quoting Bleacheddecay:

You might find these links useful.

http://dyslexia.yale.edu/EDU_homeschool.html

http://www.mariannesunderland.com/2012/10/homeschooling-with-dyslexia-get-curriculum/

http://www.thehealthyhomeschool.com/dyslexia

I would HIGHLY recommend POC4U which helped me find curriculum that fit my kid's learning styles better.

http://www.edudps.com/poc4u.html


TJandKarasMom
by Debbie on Jul. 5, 2013 at 6:58 PM
Thank you! I will definitely look into these. Surprisingly, she doesn't have a lot of reading issues, but she needs a lot of help with spelling. It's really funny how she knows the words when she sees them, but she can't recall them to spell them.


Quoting AutymsMommy:

Apples and Pears Spelling and Dancing Bears reading (same company does both).

Much more affordable.


TJandKarasMom
by Debbie on Jul. 5, 2013 at 7:00 PM
1 mom liked this
Thank you! I will definitely try the Greek and Roman math, my son would love learning that just for fun and it would be great if it helped my daughter. I like hearing how others deal with it! My husband told me when he writes a b or a d, he makes an o with just a little line then looks at it to make sure the line is on the right side for the letter he wants...the little tricks we have to teach her.


Quoting kirbymom:

My husband and I both grew up dyslexic. I didn't know that it could be dealt with then. My husband found after he was about 17 that learning Greek and Roman math helped him a whole bunch. He has helped me deal with mine and we have taught our kids( since it is heriditary ) how to combat it, using the same advice as the above advice given. My dyslexia is even to the point that I say my words just like your daughter does. My husband is saying that by showing her the way other languages are spelled may make more sense in how words are put together and help her learn American English better. You might also want to look up how the brain works. That is how I was able to help my kids. The way the snapsis of the brain is and the electrical charge and the neurons work and what happens when they are both not working and working. Maybe make a school lesson/game out of it with your daughter. If you do happen to try the Roman math, try learning in the mind first and not on paper. This is also a great way to build up memory and speed. This should help her to become more confident in herself and her abilities.

TJandKarasMom
by Debbie on Jul. 5, 2013 at 7:04 PM
Thank you so much! All of this is great advice that I will keep referring back to! Colored transparencies are on my shopping list. We will also be doing a lot of hands on and oral assessing. I need to get a big white board too! Thank you again, I really love hearing advice and ideas and how real people are dealing with it!


Quoting NYCitymomx3:

Once my 12 y/o ds was diagnosed with visual dyslexia and processing speed issues last summer, I changed how we did his academic work.  Over the last year, he's gone up at least 3 grade levels in reading.  

We never used any dyslexia programs.  I just started where he was but pushed just enough to yield results. Here are some things that worked for him:

  • I read to him often and he narrates back what he remembers.  
  • We "buddy read", where I read a paragraph, then he reads a paragraph.  This method helps with his reading confidence.
  • He sometimes used a blue overlay when he read - it helps many dyslexic kids keep the words lined up better.  After a few months he didn't need it anymore.
  • A lot of his learning comes from a ton of field trips and homeschool group classes.  Hands-on and up-close work really well.  
  • Much of his bookwork is done orally with an open book and ds just telling me the answers rather than him writing things down 
  • He does spelling and math lessons on a big whiteboard and colorful markers.  The different colors helped a lot.
  • He plays Minecraft, has an iPhone, and makes tutorial videos for his youtube channel.  All these things require him to type and read a lot.  He's getting all this reading, writing, and spelling in, and having fun doing it.
  • His 7th grade curriculum, pieced together by me based on his learning style and preferences, will be very simple.  Lightning Lit 7 (a classic literature program with analysis and discussion), Wordly Wise (vocabulary program on grade level), Saxon Algebra 1/2,  K12 Human Odyssey (history that we read together and he narrates), and Apologia General Science (a 7th grade science program with a lot of experiments and a student notebook for him to do some writing). 
  • We do academics 2 hours a day, 4-5 days a week.  Afternoons are free for pursuing interests.
  • He was part of a weekly theater program this year where he learned to confidently "cold read" and memorize lines for a performance. 
  • Games like Trivial Pursuit, Yahtzee, and Monopoly are wonderful for reading and math.
  • Ds loved sight word flash cards when he was 8.  Be creative and make them fun. 
  • And find out what your dd is good at and make it a focus.  Learning happens faster when an interest or passion is mixed in.

Ds seems to truly be overcoming his dyslexia and processing speed issues.  This past year has been amazing and we didn't need to spend a lot of money. My advice is to keep a regular schedule, finish academics before noon so it's not overwhelming and neither of you burn out, and read together a lot.


mem82
by Platinum Member on Jul. 5, 2013 at 7:08 PM

I've never dealt with it but I just wanted to tell you that my grandfather has it. They didn't even have a name for it back then. (Or at least not in the schools he went to) But he learned how to read just fine. He does have HORRIBLE handwriting but that could just be a family trait since we all do. LOL

TJandKarasMom
by Debbie on Jul. 5, 2013 at 7:29 PM
Lol...my brother and my dad have it, my dad dropped out of high school and still is not a good reader, he never once read to me as a child. I remember practically forcing him to read a children's book to my son one time. My husband seems to have it as well, but it's very mild and he has dealt with it amazingly. I am wondering if my stepdaughters mother has it, and that could be why hers is not as mild as my husbands. But her mother doesn't communicate with any of us, so there is no way to find that out.

Anyway, with my dad, there was never a diagnosis or anything. With my brother, they diagnosed it and he went to the resource room and had some ways to deal, as an adult he just deals and doesn't read at all ever. He just had a baby a few months ago, so I am interested to see if he can be convinced how important it is to read to that baby! Even if its just baby books.

Reading is not a big issue for my daughter, she is pretty much on level with it, I think partly because I pushed her a lot to read. She chooses easy books sometimes and I let her, then I talk her into harder books to push her a little. Her handwriting can be very nice when she tries! But her spelling is incredibly awful, lol. I can't even figure it out, and I worked in a kindergarten with beginning writers for the past few years! I am pretty good at deciphering, but sometimes her letters don't even match the sound she was going for.


Quoting mem82:

I've never dealt with it but I just wanted to tell you that my grandfather has it. They didn't even have a name for it back then. (Or at least not in the schools he went to) But he learned how to read just fine. He does have HORRIBLE handwriting but that could just be a family trait since we all do. LOL


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