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7 Reasons I'd Never Homeschool My Teen

Stir article I am posting for discussion.

7 Reasons I'd Never Homeschool My Teen

by Ericka Sóuter

booksI recently came across the story of a Tesca Fitzgerald, who, at 12, is getting ready to start college and plans to be working her Ph.D. by age 16. Her proud mother credited her daughter's genius to the fact that she was homeschooled. Amazing, right? But I have to tell you, that is as impressive as it is crazy. It made me wonder if I could homeschool my teen or pre-teen. With the cost of private school in New York City, the idea is an attractive one. But I quickly came to my senses and here's why. Check out the 7 reasons I'd never home school my teen.

  1. I could probably get him through algebra and geometry, but we'd both need a tutor when it came to calculus. Sure, I took it in high school but it was in one ear and out the other as soon as the final was finished.
  2. I can't imagine his first intense classroom setting being a college lecture. Talk about intimidating.
  3. We'd get sick of each other by week four two. 
  4. When he complains about his bitchy teacher, he'll be talking about me.
  5. When I complain about my crappy job, I'll be talking about him.
  6. I can't teach him the same survival instincts you learn navigating your way though mean girls, jocks, geeks, or whichever else cliques exist these days.
  7. I'm not a trained educator. Parents love to complain about their kids' teachers but it's a tough job. Probably one of the toughest. It's a combo of instructor, counselor, soother, conflict resolution expert, and motivator. How exhausting is that?!

I tip my hat to all those moms and dads who successfully homeschool their children. It's clearly not something every parent can do.

Do you think you could homeschool your teen?

Are you homeschooling your teen? Do you intend to homeschool when your children are teens?

by on Jul. 16, 2013 at 9:11 AM
Replies (31-40):
lucsch
by on Jul. 16, 2013 at 9:41 PM
2 moms liked this

Yes. I will be. Yes. Absolutely. Following are my responses to the 7 reasons:

  1. I am fairly confident that I can homeschool my teen through calculus. I mean, in college, I was paid to tutor other students, so why not? However, if I couldn't there are too many choices to let this bother me--a multitude of programs, DVDs, online resources, local public school part-time, community college classes, and, yes, even a tutor!
  2. Obviously, the writer has never seen my homeschool expectations. I'd say I am "more intense" as an instructor than most college instructors. Did I mention my daughter is only in 5th grade?
  3. It is sad that some would say they'd get sick of their kid. I'm sorry, but I find that a travesty to humanity that a mother would say such a thing. One of the most rewarding attributes about homeschooling my daughter is all the time we get (yes GET, as in a PRIVILEGE) to spend together.
  4. My daughter would never complain about her "bitchy" teacher. She has more respect for me than that! Sure, she may complain about an assignment, but never about me.
  5. I worked for 17 years as an engineer, got amazing reviews, even my name on a patent. None of it, not even the pay, comes close to the reward I got from teaching my daughter to read. There is no crappy job here--nope, I left that all behind. I LOVE my job as a SAHM and homeschooler.
  6. Well, peer pressure, cliques, bullying and such have no place in my daughter's upbringing. I ONLY experienced that in public school. College was great, as was all of my workplaces. All it did in school was to kill my self-esteem and self-confidence. If you could meet my 10yo, you would see how kids are supposed to be.
  7. I'm not a trained educator, though my dh is. I don't need those skills to homeschool successfully. I suggest the writer should do some research before making such a quick and uninformed decision against homeschooling. She is shortchanging herself--and her teen son. It is one thing to make an educated decision against it (and there are some valid ones), but one based upon false stereotypes is just....dare I say...IDIOTIC.


*************************WHY WAS THIS POSTED IN OUR GROUP? *****************************

AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Jul. 16, 2013 at 10:27 PM

Well, you appear quite capable of carrying on a respectful and educated discussion, so we'll carry on! Lol.

I've met some less than savory homeschoolers myself, lol. I'll caveat with saying that within my PERSONAL circle, all (or most) are rigorous types - all or most are very educated themselves and, therefore, place a great amount of respect with academics.

Our area is very homeschool friendly, so it's possible I'm coming at this with that in mind. In my immediate area alone, we have tons of homeschool sports teams, co-ops that meet once a week (at least) and are taught by professionals/experts in their fields (and the day runs identical to a typical high school day with class periods, lunch periods, run sessions, study hall, etc), proms, field days, etc. We even have a university model private school that allows homeschoolers to register for as many (or as few) classes as they want, without fully enrolling in the school (while still needing to abide by state homeschool law, which states that a parent must provide 51% of the child's core subject instruction).

I promise that my kiddo gets her feel for strict teachers, bullies (like the girls who made fun of her in Latin class - she's dyslexic and had a difficult time with the translations), etc. Bullies and "mean people" aren't ONLY found in the conventional classroom, after all.

We do have a somewhat unique situation (although not uncommon, really, in the grand scheme of things) in that our eldest is dyslexic - a learning disorder that our state doesn't recognize as a special need (she could get an IEP that would allow for accommodations within the reg ed classroom, but there are no, say, Orton Gillingham trained professionals in the school); homeschooling allows us to use certain materials and outsource where needed, without making her entire life revolve around conventional school then after school tutors - leaving no time to just "be a kid".

We also just like having the kids around :) We enjoy a faith integrated education, family focused, etc.

I'll also note that our children will have the option of attending Catholic school locally, when they're old enough to argue it, lol. Our eldest had that option this year, but decided to stay at home (and indicates, thus far, that she wants to stay home through high school). We have two younger children as well.

On a lighter note - my husband is a scientist as well! Physics and computer science :) Nice to know a go-to for these things... science is my weak spot, lol. I hope to outsource science for high school just because I want the kiddos to have access to a full lab; unfortunately the university model school teaches young earth creation based science and that isn't something my husband will touch with a ten foot pole (no offense intended!), so we may have to make do at home.


Quoting Sister_Someone:

No problem, I'm all for educated and respectful discussion. :)

Less than savory homeschool types is a great phrase! An understatement of the century, too, as I have actually never personally encountered a case of homeschooling gone right, (which, of course, is not to say it's universally bad either), but I still love the phrase. 

Since the title of this post, the thing that got me into this in the first place, says 7 Reasons I'd Never Homeschool My TEEN, I wasn't even getting into homeschooling smaller children in my original reply. I have absolutely no problem with homeschooling children up to a certain point, unless you're teaching your children to behave like 99% of homeschooled children I personally know. If your reply is anything to go by, I have no reason to believe you are, so I'm just going to reiterate that my point had nothing to do with younger children and leave it at that.

That said, I don't understand homeschooling teens. To get this out of the way first, I do admit that I rushed into forming an opinion on quality of the education obtained through homeschooling without doing very deep research on the subject. Therefore, I can understand wanting to continue homeschooling your teen through junior high and high school if you've successfuly done it up to that point, but I also firmly believe that high school is a life experience no person should miss. That's the "wrongI was talking about in my original reply. I think that more than just providing children with education, high school is life in small-scale. How are children going to learn to put up with mean bosses or coworkers ready to stab them in the back unless they get limited exposure to such situations in a conventional school? 

And to end on a lighter note, I'm a scientist. :P Ever get stuck on telling a plant cell from an animal cell, I'll know the answer. ;-)

Quoting AutymsMommy:

I appreciate that you realized you posted in the wrong forum, lol!

Now, just because I'm not one to let a chance like this slide by, I'll reply to yours :P

Am I to assume that you hired a nutritionist to teach you how to feed your child? An OT to teach your child how to tie his shoes? A speech therapist to teach them to talk? A teacher to instruct them in the ABC song or how to count to 10? Do you hire a psychologist every time you hit an emotional roadblock with your child? I imagine you didn't. You've been teaching your child since birth; it's only society that says once they hit the ripe old age of 5 or 6 that you are no longer adequate to do so. What is so magical about that age, that if you knew your own child well enough to teach them THOSE things - it isn't enough now?

We have many former school teachers in our local co-op. We have some CURRENT school teachers on an online homeschooling forum that I belong to (with thousands of members) who are actively homeschooling or afterschooling their own children (or they no longer work in the field, but their husband does, etc). Oddly enough, they all believe that we (those of us with no teaching degree) have the ability to educate OUR OWN children; the general consensus is that going to school to learn to teach teaches one how to teach 30 different children, with 30 different home lives and learning styles, a differentiated curriculum and how to implement protocol and policy (and how to navigate those things)... almost every single one says that their training for "teaching" did nothing to prepare them to teach their own children, one on one.

Many of us are future/college oriented. Many of us, even without high school aged children as yet, are already looking toward the day that we may have to outsource (to a tutor or to a co-op with area specific expert teachers) a subject or two (mine will likely be science, lol). I would never leave my child to linger and under perform and I well recognize my own limitations. Most of us do. Don't underestimate the whole. Your reply reads as though you've met some less than savory homeschool types; you also read as intelligent enough to KNOW that you shouldn't judge a whole by the few you've seen/met.


Quoting Sister_Someone:

#7 is the reason why I think homeschooling is just wrong. I wouldn't let someone unqualified or underqualified even step a foot into the lab where I work in fear of them damaging something, so obviously I won't pretend I can teach when I'm not qualified to be an educator.







I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff: we have traditional gender roles, we're Catholic, I'm Libertarian, he's Republican, we're both conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee














sha_lyn68
by Bronze Member on Jul. 17, 2013 at 12:09 AM
3 moms liked this

  1. I could probably get him through algebra and geometry, but we'd both need a tutor when it came to calculus. Sure, I took it in high school but it was in one ear and out the other as soon as the final was finished. What is wrong with hiring a tutor? Lots of public school students end up needing tutors.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
  2. I can't imagine his first intense classroom setting being a college lecture. Talk about intimidating. Why would a homeschooler's first intense classroom setting be a college lecture? Sounds like the word imagine is the only relevant word in the entire post. She imagines a whole heck of a lot.                                                                                  
  3. We'd get sick of each other by week four two. How do they manage summertime?                 
  4. When he complains about his bitchy teacher, he'll be talking about me. When he talks about his bitchy mother he's talking about her too. Maybe she shouldn't be a bitch to begin with.                                                                                                 
  5. When I complain about my crappy job, I'll be talking about him. She thinks homeschooling is a job? ROFLMAO. Where do I go to sign up for my benefits and pay?                      
  6. I can't teach him the same survival instincts you learn navigating your way though mean girls, jocks, geeks, or whichever else cliques exist these days. Right, because all those are tolerated in the real world...NOT
  1. I'm not a trained educator. Parents love to complain about their kids' teachers but it's a tough job. Probably one of the toughest. It's a combo of instructor, counselor, soother, conflict resolution expert, and motivator. How exhausting is that?! All those "jobs" go along with parenting. I wonder why she even bothered to have kids if she doesn't want to do any of those things.


She really comes off as being bitter and resentful of the responsibilities of being a parent. I'm glad she realizes she should homeschooling because if she hates her child so much he needs a break from her.

AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Jul. 17, 2013 at 12:32 AM
Hey hey hey. I am very close to my children... but we enjoy time apart as well, lol.


Quoting sha_lyn68:

  1. I could probably get him through algebra and geometry, but we'd both need a tutor when it came to calculus. Sure, I took it in high school but it was in one ear and out the other as soon as the final was finished. What is wrong with hiring a tutor? Lots of public school students end up needing tutors.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
  2. I can't imagine his first intense classroom setting being a college lecture. Talk about intimidating. Why would a homeschooler's first intense classroom setting be a college lecture? Sounds like the word imagine is the only relevant word in the entire post. She imagines a whole heck of a lot.                                                                                  
  3. We'd get sick of each other by week four two. How do they manage summertime?                 
  4. When he complains about his bitchy teacher, he'll be talking about me. When he talks about his bitchy mother he's talking about her too. Maybe she shouldn't be a bitch to begin with.                                                                                                 
  5. When I complain about my crappy job, I'll be talking about him. She thinks homeschooling is a job? ROFLMAO. Where do I go to sign up for my benefits and pay?                      
  6. I can't teach him the same survival instincts you learn navigating your way though mean girls, jocks, geeks, or whichever else cliques exist these days. Right, because all those are tolerated in the real world...NOT
  1. I'm not a trained educator. Parents love to complain about their kids' teachers but it's a tough job. Probably one of the toughest. It's a combo of instructor, counselor, soother, conflict resolution expert, and motivator. How exhausting is that?! All those "jobs" go along with parenting. I wonder why she even bothered to have kids if she doesn't want to do any of those things.


She really comes off as being bitter and resentful of the responsibilities of being a parent. I'm glad she realizes she should homeschooling because if she hates her child so much he needs a break from her.


bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Jul. 17, 2013 at 6:44 AM
2 moms liked this

I had only planned on homeschooling my kds as teens.  I am very thankful that  pulled my children out of te ps at such a young age, but I personally did not feel prepared to teach the younger grades.  Teens can work by themselves more, there are more opportunities (around me) for outside classes and experiences, and teens are just my specialty.  I knew that our local ps has its igh school on the other side of the mountain.  The kids on our side of the mountain need to catch their buses very early.  The dropout rate in the high school is nearly 40%.  And the really interestin number was whe they broke that dropout rate down and noticed that the "valey kids" had a DOrate of 80% while the "mountain kids" had a DOrate of 4%.  Anyway, the school is working very hard to improve the "valley kids" experience often at the expense of the "mountain kids."  So I planned on just short-circuiting all of that and teaching myself.  But I am very glad that  pulled my younger kids, it gave me a lot of on the "job" skills that surprised me.  As a former high school teacher, I never realized how different it would be to teach my own children!!

usmom3
by BJ on Jul. 17, 2013 at 3:03 PM
2 moms liked this

 

Quoting Maridel:

How do i make one of those faces rolling its eyes? Seriously it amazes how many parents don't like spending time with their kids

 eye rollingHere you go!

I don't understand parents not wanting to spend time with there children ether!

IntlMom12
by on Jul. 18, 2013 at 7:49 AM

Yes, I plan to homeschool my boys through high school. They are only 5 and 6 right now, though, so that will be a while.

Carmen
"For I know the thoughts that I think toward you, says the Lord, thoughts of peace and not of evil, to give you a future and a hope." Jeremiah 29:11 NKJ

Sister_Someone
by on Jul. 18, 2013 at 4:15 PM


Your area does indeed sound very homeschool-friendly! I've never heard of most of these options you have available even existing here, which is not to say they don't, but I will say that all but one of the homeschooling parents I know basically just sit around with their kids at their dining table, and aren't even actively teaching  them, they just sit around and do something else while their child is doing (or, in most cases, pretending to be doing) the work. I know this first hand because I've witnessed it, more than once and in more than one family. I suppose that has led me to think that homeschooling works that way and has a lot to do with the negative opinion I have about it..

I'm glad you found a way to make things work for your oldest daughter. :)) My best friend is dyslexic and I've seen some of the struggles he's faced back in the early- to mid-90's when dyslexia was still mostly being filed under laziness instead of acknowledged as an actual learning disability.

It's good that you mentioned that you will be giving your kids the option to attend Catholic school, because it leads me to another problem I have with the concept of homeschooling, which is the "having an option" part. I will say, as a disclaimer, that my point on this is heavily influenced by the fact that from a very early age I only had one option in my life, which was to suck it up, shake the dust off and deal with whatever comes my way regardless of whether I liked it. Now I got that out of the way, I just don't think that kids should have the option to attend school if they want to. Let's face it, most kids these days would choose to learn in home rather than in school, if they had a say in the matter. Which is precisely why I think they shouldn't have a say. As I said earlier, school also teaches life, and in life they will sometimes have to do things they don't want to because someone with more authority told them so.

Ooh, physics and cs. I bet he's a goofball, most physicists I've met through work and college are. I'm a biologist. :)) I have to back him on the Young Earth creationism though. Their doctrine ranks quite high on my list of things that I just don't listen to. Another suggestion: if you have private research universities in your area, try hitting them for lab options. I don't know if this is common practice, but my alma mater offered biology, chemistry and physics courses for homeschooled kids, usually taught by recent grads or seniors. I actually taught one of these for extra cash when I was wrapping up my master's studies (which is another reason why I'm anti-homeschooling -- those were high school aged children and some of them had no idea that humans are mammals).

Quoting AutymsMommy:

Well, you appear quite capable of carrying on a respectful and educated discussion, so we'll carry on! Lol.

I've met some less than savory homeschoolers myself, lol. I'll caveat with saying that within my PERSONAL circle, all (or most) are rigorous types - all or most are very educated themselves and, therefore, place a great amount of respect with academics.

Our area is very homeschool friendly, so it's possible I'm coming at this with that in mind. In my immediate area alone, we have tons of homeschool sports teams, co-ops that meet once a week (at least) and are taught by professionals/experts in their fields (and the day runs identical to a typical high school day with class periods, lunch periods, run sessions, study hall, etc), proms, field days, etc. We even have a university model private school that allows homeschoolers to register for as many (or as few) classes as they want, without fully enrolling in the school (while still needing to abide by state homeschool law, which states that a parent must provide 51% of the child's core subject instruction).

I promise that my kiddo gets her feel for strict teachers, bullies (like the girls who made fun of her in Latin class - she's dyslexic and had a difficult time with the translations), etc. Bullies and "mean people" aren't ONLY found in the conventional classroom, after all.

We do have a somewhat unique situation (although not uncommon, really, in the grand scheme of things) in that our eldest is dyslexic - a learning disorder that our state doesn't recognize as a special need (she could get an IEP that would allow for accommodations within the reg ed classroom, but there are no, say, Orton Gillingham trained professionals in the school); homeschooling allows us to use certain materials and outsource where needed, without making her entire life revolve around conventional school then after school tutors - leaving no time to just "be a kid".

We also just like having the kids around :) We enjoy a faith integrated education, family focused, etc.

I'll also note that our children will have the option of attending Catholic school locally, when they're old enough to argue it, lol. Our eldest had that option this year, but decided to stay at home (and indicates, thus far, that she wants to stay home through high school). We have two younger children as well.

On a lighter note - my husband is a scientist as well! Physics and computer science :) Nice to know a go-to for these things... science is my weak spot, lol. I hope to outsource science for high school just because I want the kiddos to have access to a full lab; unfortunately the university model school teaches young earth creation based science and that isn't something my husband will touch with a ten foot pole (no offense intended!), so we may have to make do at home.


Quoting Sister_Someone:

No problem, I'm all for educated and respectful discussion. :)

Less than savory homeschool types is a great phrase! An understatement of the century, too, as I have actually never personally encountered a case of homeschooling gone right, (which, of course, is not to say it's universally bad either), but I still love the phrase. 

Since the title of this post, the thing that got me into this in the first place, says 7 Reasons I'd Never Homeschool My TEEN, I wasn't even getting into homeschooling smaller children in my original reply. I have absolutely no problem with homeschooling children up to a certain point, unless you're teaching your children to behave like 99% of homeschooled children I personally know. If your reply is anything to go by, I have no reason to believe you are, so I'm just going to reiterate that my point had nothing to do with younger children and leave it at that.

That said, I don't understand homeschooling teens. To get this out of the way first, I do admit that I rushed into forming an opinion on quality of the education obtained through homeschooling without doing very deep research on the subject. Therefore, I can understand wanting to continue homeschooling your teen through junior high and high school if you've successfuly done it up to that point, but I also firmly believe that high school is a life experience no person should miss. That's the "wrongI was talking about in my original reply. I think that more than just providing children with education, high school is life in small-scale. How are children going to learn to put up with mean bosses or coworkers ready to stab them in the back unless they get limited exposure to such situations in a conventional school? 

And to end on a lighter note, I'm a scientist. :P Ever get stuck on telling a plant cell from an animal cell, I'll know the answer. ;-)

Quoting AutymsMommy:

I appreciate that you realized you posted in the wrong forum, lol!

Now, just because I'm not one to let a chance like this slide by, I'll reply to yours :P

Am I to assume that you hired a nutritionist to teach you how to feed your child? An OT to teach your child how to tie his shoes? A speech therapist to teach them to talk? A teacher to instruct them in the ABC song or how to count to 10? Do you hire a psychologist every time you hit an emotional roadblock with your child? I imagine you didn't. You've been teaching your child since birth; it's only society that says once they hit the ripe old age of 5 or 6 that you are no longer adequate to do so. What is so magical about that age, that if you knew your own child well enough to teach them THOSE things - it isn't enough now?

We have many former school teachers in our local co-op. We have some CURRENT school teachers on an online homeschooling forum that I belong to (with thousands of members) who are actively homeschooling or afterschooling their own children (or they no longer work in the field, but their husband does, etc). Oddly enough, they all believe that we (those of us with no teaching degree) have the ability to educate OUR OWN children; the general consensus is that going to school to learn to teach teaches one how to teach 30 different children, with 30 different home lives and learning styles, a differentiated curriculum and how to implement protocol and policy (and how to navigate those things)... almost every single one says that their training for "teaching" did nothing to prepare them to teach their own children, one on one.

Many of us are future/college oriented. Many of us, even without high school aged children as yet, are already looking toward the day that we may have to outsource (to a tutor or to a co-op with area specific expert teachers) a subject or two (mine will likely be science, lol). I would never leave my child to linger and under perform and I well recognize my own limitations. Most of us do. Don't underestimate the whole. Your reply reads as though you've met some less than savory homeschool types; you also read as intelligent enough to KNOW that you shouldn't judge a whole by the few you've seen/met.


Quoting Sister_Someone:

#7 is the reason why I think homeschooling is just wrong. I wouldn't let someone unqualified or underqualified even step a foot into the lab where I work in fear of them damaging something, so obviously I won't pretend I can teach when I'm not qualified to be an educator.









AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Jul. 18, 2013 at 4:36 PM


Actually our eldest would love to go back to school. We will not give her the option of public (for the reasons I mentioned earlier) and she doesn't want to go back to CATHOLIC school... because (get this) she doesn't want to wear a uniform, lol! The other private schools in the area are protestant (Bible belt) and we could never sign off on their statements of faith. Oh, and the 20K a year school for dyslexics.

If I may be frank - I've never understood how brick and mortar school "teaches life". Never again, in adulthood, will my child have to walk in a straight line, raise her hand to speak, or get a pass to use the restroom; regarding interaction, co-ops and extracurriculars fill the need nicely, in terms of encountering diversity, bullies, and teachers other than mom and dad.

We don't, to my knowledge, have any research universities in the area. Wish we did though. She'll have the option again to go to the local Catholic prep school (wonderful science program) for high school, should they have the resources she needs (regarding her dyslexia; at the moment they only have resources for very mild learning disabilities).

I think my husband would hurt himself if our children didn't know that humans are mammals. I mean really hurt himself, lol. He did a biology stint himself (and a little bit of time in the medical field, many moons ago). He CAN be a bit of a goofball (with me; with others he tends to be reserved, lol).

Please take into consideration, when considering homeschoolers, that not every child CAN get what they need from public school and, often, the private schools are non-profit and haven't the resources for special needs (like the Catholic schools here, one of which is JUST NOW launching a program for dyslexics, but it is prohibitively expensive, as it doubles the normal tuition and fees).

Ultimately, each child is different and needs different things. If I ever felt that I wasn't giving one of my children what they need at home, it's off to school they would be - like it or not. We only give a choice because what we are doing IS working right now, but we would never want them to look back and regret not having some of the wonderful experiences my husband and I remember from our school days. Their education and happiness, however, is our priority - more so than their experience.

Quoting Sister_Someone:


Your area does indeed sound very homeschool-friendly! I've never heard of most of these options you have available even existing here, which is not to say they don't, but I will say that all but one of the homeschooling parents I know basically just sit around with their kids at their dining table, and aren't even actively teaching  them, they just sit around and do something else while their child is doing (or, in most cases, pretending to be doing) the work. I know this first hand because I've witnessed it, more than once and in more than one family. I suppose that has led me to think that homeschooling works that way and has a lot to do with the negative opinion I have about it..

I'm glad you found a way to make things work for your oldest daughter. :)) My best friend is dyslexic and I've seen some of the struggles he's faced back in the early- to mid-90's when dyslexia was still mostly being filed under laziness instead of acknowledged as an actual learning disability.

It's good that you mentioned that you will be giving your kids the option to attend Catholic school, because it leads me to another problem I have with the concept of homeschooling, which is the "having an option" part. I will say, as a disclaimer, that my point on this is heavily influenced by the fact that from a very early age I only had one option in my life, which was to suck it up, shake the dust off and deal with whatever comes my way regardless of whether I liked it. Now I got that out of the way, I just don't think that kids should have the option to attend school if they want to. Let's face it, most kids these days would choose to learn in home rather than in school, if they had a say in the matter. Which is precisely why I think they shouldn't have a say. As I said earlier, school also teaches life, and in life they will sometimes have to do things they don't want to because someone with more authority told them so.

Ooh, physics and cs. I bet he's a goofball, most physicists I've met through work and college are. I'm a biologist. :)) I have to back him on the Young Earth creationism though. Their doctrine ranks quite high on my list of things that I just don't listen to. Another suggestion: if you have private research universities in your area, try hitting them for lab options. I don't know if this is common practice, but my alma mater offered biology, chemistry and physics courses for homeschooled kids, usually taught by recent grads or seniors. I actually taught one of these for extra cash when I was wrapping up my master's studies (which is another reason why I'm anti-homeschooling -- those were high school aged children and some of them had no idea that humans are mammals).

Quoting AutymsMommy:

Well, you appear quite capable of carrying on a respectful and educated discussion, so we'll carry on! Lol.

I've met some less than savory homeschoolers myself, lol. I'll caveat with saying that within my PERSONAL circle, all (or most) are rigorous types - all or most are very educated themselves and, therefore, place a great amount of respect with academics.

Our area is very homeschool friendly, so it's possible I'm coming at this with that in mind. In my immediate area alone, we have tons of homeschool sports teams, co-ops that meet once a week (at least) and are taught by professionals/experts in their fields (and the day runs identical to a typical high school day with class periods, lunch periods, run sessions, study hall, etc), proms, field days, etc. We even have a university model private school that allows homeschoolers to register for as many (or as few) classes as they want, without fully enrolling in the school (while still needing to abide by state homeschool law, which states that a parent must provide 51% of the child's core subject instruction).

I promise that my kiddo gets her feel for strict teachers, bullies (like the girls who made fun of her in Latin class - she's dyslexic and had a difficult time with the translations), etc. Bullies and "mean people" aren't ONLY found in the conventional classroom, after all.

We do have a somewhat unique situation (although not uncommon, really, in the grand scheme of things) in that our eldest is dyslexic - a learning disorder that our state doesn't recognize as a special need (she could get an IEP that would allow for accommodations within the reg ed classroom, but there are no, say, Orton Gillingham trained professionals in the school); homeschooling allows us to use certain materials and outsource where needed, without making her entire life revolve around conventional school then after school tutors - leaving no time to just "be a kid".

We also just like having the kids around :) We enjoy a faith integrated education, family focused, etc.

I'll also note that our children will have the option of attending Catholic school locally, when they're old enough to argue it, lol. Our eldest had that option this year, but decided to stay at home (and indicates, thus far, that she wants to stay home through high school). We have two younger children as well.

On a lighter note - my husband is a scientist as well! Physics and computer science :) Nice to know a go-to for these things... science is my weak spot, lol. I hope to outsource science for high school just because I want the kiddos to have access to a full lab; unfortunately the university model school teaches young earth creation based science and that isn't something my husband will touch with a ten foot pole (no offense intended!), so we may have to make do at home.


Quoting Sister_Someone:

No problem, I'm all for educated and respectful discussion. :)

Less than savory homeschool types is a great phrase! An understatement of the century, too, as I have actually never personally encountered a case of homeschooling gone right, (which, of course, is not to say it's universally bad either), but I still love the phrase. 

Since the title of this post, the thing that got me into this in the first place, says 7 Reasons I'd Never Homeschool My TEEN, I wasn't even getting into homeschooling smaller children in my original reply. I have absolutely no problem with homeschooling children up to a certain point, unless you're teaching your children to behave like 99% of homeschooled children I personally know. If your reply is anything to go by, I have no reason to believe you are, so I'm just going to reiterate that my point had nothing to do with younger children and leave it at that.

That said, I don't understand homeschooling teens. To get this out of the way first, I do admit that I rushed into forming an opinion on quality of the education obtained through homeschooling without doing very deep research on the subject. Therefore, I can understand wanting to continue homeschooling your teen through junior high and high school if you've successfuly done it up to that point, but I also firmly believe that high school is a life experience no person should miss. That's the "wrongI was talking about in my original reply. I think that more than just providing children with education, high school is life in small-scale. How are children going to learn to put up with mean bosses or coworkers ready to stab them in the back unless they get limited exposure to such situations in a conventional school? 

And to end on a lighter note, I'm a scientist. :P Ever get stuck on telling a plant cell from an animal cell, I'll know the answer. ;-)

Quoting AutymsMommy:

I appreciate that you realized you posted in the wrong forum, lol!

Now, just because I'm not one to let a chance like this slide by, I'll reply to yours :P

Am I to assume that you hired a nutritionist to teach you how to feed your child? An OT to teach your child how to tie his shoes? A speech therapist to teach them to talk? A teacher to instruct them in the ABC song or how to count to 10? Do you hire a psychologist every time you hit an emotional roadblock with your child? I imagine you didn't. You've been teaching your child since birth; it's only society that says once they hit the ripe old age of 5 or 6 that you are no longer adequate to do so. What is so magical about that age, that if you knew your own child well enough to teach them THOSE things - it isn't enough now?

We have many former school teachers in our local co-op. We have some CURRENT school teachers on an online homeschooling forum that I belong to (with thousands of members) who are actively homeschooling or afterschooling their own children (or they no longer work in the field, but their husband does, etc). Oddly enough, they all believe that we (those of us with no teaching degree) have the ability to educate OUR OWN children; the general consensus is that going to school to learn to teach teaches one how to teach 30 different children, with 30 different home lives and learning styles, a differentiated curriculum and how to implement protocol and policy (and how to navigate those things)... almost every single one says that their training for "teaching" did nothing to prepare them to teach their own children, one on one.

Many of us are future/college oriented. Many of us, even without high school aged children as yet, are already looking toward the day that we may have to outsource (to a tutor or to a co-op with area specific expert teachers) a subject or two (mine will likely be science, lol). I would never leave my child to linger and under perform and I well recognize my own limitations. Most of us do. Don't underestimate the whole. Your reply reads as though you've met some less than savory homeschool types; you also read as intelligent enough to KNOW that you shouldn't judge a whole by the few you've seen/met.


Quoting Sister_Someone:

#7 is the reason why I think homeschooling is just wrong. I wouldn't let someone unqualified or underqualified even step a foot into the lab where I work in fear of them damaging something, so obviously I won't pretend I can teach when I'm not qualified to be an educator.











I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff: we have traditional gender roles, we're Catholic, I'm Libertarian, he's Republican, we're both conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee














kirbymom
by Sonja on Jul. 18, 2013 at 8:10 PM
1 mom liked this
Isn't that what a mother is already? A mother has been her child's very first teacher without even realizing it. That being said, there is no reason why a mother can not teach her child all that needs to be taught for their mental and intellectual education and their academic education. We mothers did whatever it took to not only carry to term but to labor through until their birth. So why not go the rest of the nine yards and be there for them academically?

Quoting Sister_Someone:

#7 is the reason why I think homeschooling is just wrong. I wouldn't let someone unqualified or underqualified even step a foot into the lab where I work in fear of them damaging something, so obviously I won't pretend I can teach when I'm not qualified to be an educator.

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