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Which curriculum?????????????

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If you have experience with any of these, Please give me the good, the bad and the ugly about them.


Easy Peasy

Seton

CompleteCurriculum.com


I will have a 2nd grader and 1st grader this upcoming year. 

Thank you!!

by on Jul. 25, 2013 at 4:18 PM
Replies (11-19):
Dorra
by on Jul. 25, 2013 at 11:24 PM
A blend would be good. I love history and so far the girls really want to learn more history as well. I would love to find a curriculum that has a good history and science.

I'm looking for the cheaper side. So anything free or fairly cheap.


Quoting swim-mom72:

I have no experience with any of those, sorry.


would you prefer secular, christian or a blend or you don't really care?

oahoah
by Member on Jul. 25, 2013 at 11:30 PM
1 mom liked this

WE have tried a lot of different curriculum: (thankfully most was given to us) so here is a list of what we've used before and then I'll say what I did and did not like after the list: KONOS, BJU Press, Horizons, Apologia, Mystery of History, Story of the World, Queen Homeschool, Saxon, My Father's World, LifePac for Science.

I still have and plan to use KONOS but not on its own just because I am not very organized and it takes a bit of advance planning (at least 2 weeks ahead to request books from the library)-KONOS is great for character building and history so I will tend to focus on a character trait I'd like tow ork on my children with and then we will look up that particular trait and read up on it and do some of the activities and bible readings referenced;  I have MFW and really like how it's laid out and plan to use that when my 1st grader is in 2nd as he tends to be more "school-oriented" and likes workbooks versus my oldest who does not;  I did not care for Saxon math, mainly because of the size of the books, my oldest looked at it and almost had a coronary! I like Horizons K and 1st and  Queen Homeschool math which I plan on using for my pre-k kid because it is very basic, but am currently using Dreambox Learning for math for my older 2 boys (bought with a great discount through Homeschool Buyers Co-op), I like Mystery of History much better than Story of the World.  I really like Apologia's science which we have used last year through our co-op (Zoology and will use Astronomy this year); I like Lifepac's science for 2nd grade but again it comes down to workbooks and it has remained largely untouched by my just-finished 2nd grader.  I did not like BJU Press because it feels too overwhelming, the TG's are huge and I have the mentality that we have to do all this great stuff, I can't pick & choose. That being said I am using it for 1st grade reading this year because that is what I have!

This year I am considering Heart of Dakota or Ambleside Online.

 I have been studying Charlotte Mason a lot and that is why I'm leaning towards Ambleside, I am wanting to simplify and not be overwhelmed by which curriculum to choose or buy stuff that we don't use like in the past.  When you are first starting out, the hard part is learning by trial & error which way your kids are going to learn best. I am reading Educating the Wholehearted Child by Clay Clarkson and it has been very helpful to me in remembering what our goals are and our reasons for homeschooling our kids (religious book).  Another great book for simplifying is The 3 R's by Ruth Beechick.  I wish I would've found it 2 years ago.  I was lucky enough when I started out, to join a great homeschool group of many mom's who had the experience behind them and were able to give advice on what worked for them and what didn't and also to explain that certain things I was most worried about ended up being such minor things; I also met new moms starting out and have made some great friends through these groups. I found mine through Yahoo groups.  Good luck with whatever you choose to do and remember to just enjoy the time with your kids!

swim-mom72
by on Jul. 25, 2013 at 11:34 PM
1 mom liked this

 Queens Homeschooling has some good priced items. I would suggest their history for the ages of your kids.

Oak Meadow, mentioned by another poster, may be a good choice for science. Or "A Reason for Science", but it may be a bit more than you want to spend if you want to buy the kit with all of the supplies for the experiments.

You could look at currclick for reading and supplemental material.

And for math you may do fine with Time4Learning or finding Math U See used on ebay or even trying Horizons.


Quoting Dorra:

A blend would be good. I love history and so far the girls really want to learn more history as well. I would love to find a curriculum that has a good history and science.

I'm looking for the cheaper side. So anything free or fairly cheap.


Quoting swim-mom72:

I have no experience with any of those, sorry.


would you prefer secular, christian or a blend or you don't really care?


 

debramommyof4
by Silver Member on Jul. 26, 2013 at 12:01 AM
2 moms liked this
I only like easy peasy as a filler also. I have not used the other 2. When I was planning in case we moved in with my husbands parents and I had to go it alone ( I want to they want charter schools and so does my husband). Here is what I chose and I still can use parts this year and in a few years with my younger 2.

My girls are 1st and 2nd this year.

I bought complete curriculum workbooks mainly as a guide.

I signed them up for khan academy for math.

I found a few websites for grammer and some spelling lists online.

I got a handwriting book from Sam's club that had everything from drawing lines to cursive writing.

I picked out a book called 100 classic children's stories for my 1st grader and my 2nd grader picked out 2 series, a book of poems and a single book for lit.

For history we are still going to use the Magic Tree house series as a bases.

We are using the Magic school bus DVDs as a base for our science program.

With both of those subjects we are going to use the library extensively.

Just some ideas. Good luck.
Pukalani79
by Kristin on Jul. 26, 2013 at 1:53 AM

 I haven't but here's a bump.  We use Oak Meadow.  They are very strong in History particularly

celticdragon77
by on Jul. 27, 2013 at 1:50 AM
1 mom liked this

Did you already rule out lesson pathways? I have used that to help with some of my lesson planning.

I did also browse the easy peasy - but it is harder to navigate to find specifics. It seems like a good one to use, from what I have seen. 

Complete Curriculum costs money - and I go online for free resources. 

Seton - it has the pope right there on the front page so I know its not my thing. 

Ambleside is okay if all you want your kids to is read - otherwise you need to get creative with coming up with assignments. Also, I do not think that every subject is covered on their website.

None of these free sites ever seem to be complete enough. However, take my opinion wth a grain of salt - I also have yet to find a complete anything yet. 

Math Mammoth - is a good cheap math program. Your kids are young. Skip the tests, answer booklets or any instructional guides. JUST ONLY buy the workbooks. She did what Singapore did, and broke the grades into two parts (ie: making you pay for two workbooks rather than one). WHich is fine. Pay the $10 now for the one workbook, complete it, and then buy the next one for $10.- It is an excellent program and she used to have excellent youtube videos - though she might have taken the useful ones (the teaching ones) down now that her program has caught on with homeschoolers. Have kids play games, keep an interactive math journal (google "interactive math journal"). 

Explode The Code works fantastic for many parents is enough for most kids to learn how to read with. It is fairly cheap. 

Science and History can be done for free with the public library and the internet.

Buy a good solid encyclopedia for history and some history pockets from Evan Moor. The encylopedia can be your timeline and spine to work off of. Have the kids keep a history notebook (google "notebooking"). 

Science ... wow there is so much to do there... nature books, nature journal, experiment data workbook, website or book on science experiments... nature walks... 

Then splurge on a decent english program. I prefer MCT - but that is pricey. Maybe someone else has a better more affordable option.

They sell books called ".... book of lists" there all kinds of them and by different authors. Here is an Amazon link to one of them. Look in the section called "customers who bought this item also bought" - it will list more of these books.

Another good series is "the complete book of..." Here is another link and look in the same section to see more in this series. 

Youtube and khan has a lot of great free stuff. Netflix is a handy cheap tool. Math Mammoth has a free section - on her website. 

Finally, Rainbow Resources ahs a HUGE free catalogue that is worth ordering (for free). It also one of the cheapest sites to buy from! Spend $50+ dollars and shippping is free. 

"Wouldnt it be nice if we lived in a world where Zimmerman offered Trayvon a ride home to get him out of the rain that night." 

Britty1987
by Member on Jul. 27, 2013 at 10:10 AM
I got my 1st Rainbow Resource book in the mail this week... it's so big it's almost overwhelming! But its a great resource :)


Quoting celticdragon77:

Did you already rule out lesson pathways? I have used that to help with some of my lesson planning.

I did also browse the easy peasy - but it is harder to navigate to find specifics. It seems like a good one to use, from what I have seen. 

Complete Curriculum costs money - and I go online for free resources. 

Seton - it has the pope right there on the front page so I know its not my thing. 

Ambleside is okay if all you want your kids to is read - otherwise you need to get creative with coming up with assignments. Also, I do not think that every subject is covered on their website.

None of these free sites ever seem to be complete enough. However, take my opinion wth a grain of salt - I also have yet to find a complete anything yet. 

Math Mammoth - is a good cheap math program. Your kids are young. Skip the tests, answer booklets or any instructional guides. JUST ONLY buy the workbooks. She did what Singapore did, and broke the grades into two parts (ie: making you pay for two workbooks rather than one). WHich is fine. Pay the $10 now for the one workbook, complete it, and then buy the next one for $10.- It is an excellent program and she used to have excellent youtube videos - though she might have taken the useful ones (the teaching ones) down now that her program has caught on with homeschoolers. Have kids play games, keep an interactive math journal (google "interactive math journal"). 

Explode The Code works fantastic for many parents is enough for most kids to learn how to read with. It is fairly cheap. 

Science and History can be done for free with the public library and the internet.

Buy a good solid encyclopedia for history and some history pockets from Evan Moor. The encylopedia can be your timeline and spine to work off of. Have the kids keep a history notebook (google "notebooking"). 

Science ... wow there is so much to do there... nature books, nature journal, experiment data workbook, website or book on science experiments... nature walks... 

Then splurge on a decent english program. I prefer MCT - but that is pricey. Maybe someone else has a better more affordable option.

They sell books called ".... book of lists" there all kinds of them and by different authors. Here is an Amazon link to one of them. Look in the section called "customers who bought this item also bought" - it will list more of these books.

Another good series is "the complete book of..." Here is another link and look in the same section to see more in this series. 

Youtube and khan has a lot of great free stuff. Netflix is a handy cheap tool. Math Mammoth has a free section - on her website. 

Finally, Rainbow Resources ahs a HUGE free catalogue that is worth ordering (for free). It also one of the cheapest sites to buy from! Spend $50+ dollars and shippping is free. 


celticdragon77
by on Jul. 27, 2013 at 10:45 AM
1 mom liked this

Oddly enough, you look through it enough and it becomes familar to you. lol

Quoting Britty1987:

I got my 1st Rainbow Resource book in the mail this week... it's so big it's almost overwhelming! But its a great resource :)


Quoting celticdragon77:

Did you already rule out lesson pathways? I have used that to help with some of my lesson planning.

I did also browse the easy peasy - but it is harder to navigate to find specifics. It seems like a good one to use, from what I have seen. 

Complete Curriculum costs money - and I go online for free resources. 

Seton - it has the pope right there on the front page so I know its not my thing. 

Ambleside is okay if all you want your kids to is read - otherwise you need to get creative with coming up with assignments. Also, I do not think that every subject is covered on their website.

None of these free sites ever seem to be complete enough. However, take my opinion wth a grain of salt - I also have yet to find a complete anything yet. 

Math Mammoth - is a good cheap math program. Your kids are young. Skip the tests, answer booklets or any instructional guides. JUST ONLY buy the workbooks. She did what Singapore did, and broke the grades into two parts (ie: making you pay for two workbooks rather than one). WHich is fine. Pay the $10 now for the one workbook, complete it, and then buy the next one for $10.- It is an excellent program and she used to have excellent youtube videos - though she might have taken the useful ones (the teaching ones) down now that her program has caught on with homeschoolers. Have kids play games, keep an interactive math journal (google "interactive math journal"). 

Explode The Code works fantastic for many parents is enough for most kids to learn how to read with. It is fairly cheap. 

Science and History can be done for free with the public library and the internet.

Buy a good solid encyclopedia for history and some history pockets from Evan Moor. The encylopedia can be your timeline and spine to work off of. Have the kids keep a history notebook (google "notebooking"). 

Science ... wow there is so much to do there... nature books, nature journal, experiment data workbook, website or book on science experiments... nature walks... 

Then splurge on a decent english program. I prefer MCT - but that is pricey. Maybe someone else has a better more affordable option.

They sell books called ".... book of lists" there all kinds of them and by different authors. Here is an Amazon link to one of them. Look in the section called "customers who bought this item also bought" - it will list more of these books.

Another good series is "the complete book of..." Here is another link and look in the same section to see more in this series. 

Youtube and khan has a lot of great free stuff. Netflix is a handy cheap tool. Math Mammoth has a free section - on her website. 

Finally, Rainbow Resources ahs a HUGE free catalogue that is worth ordering (for free). It also one of the cheapest sites to buy from! Spend $50+ dollars and shippping is free. 



tattooEdgy Homeschool Moms

peachwine
by on Jul. 29, 2013 at 1:01 AM
Check craigslist and amazon. I purchased some teacher's manuals last yr from craigslist and bought the student book s from Abeka. I got my other books from Amazon. They have many public school text as well as home school materials. I'm trying to pick a science and social studies curriculum. Take care. ....( sorry my typing is poor..I'm on my tablet.. :)
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