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How do you teach more than one grade level?

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hints and ideas about teaching more than one grade level at a time?

by on Jul. 29, 2013 at 10:18 AM
Replies (21-29):
southernwldchld
by Member on Jul. 30, 2013 at 9:22 PM

We do everything together. Our kids use a parent partnership progam so they have workshops during the week. The workshops aren't age based per se, they do have a general guideline of this workshop is better for K-1, 2-3, 4-6, etc. But you don't have to do that. They're used to working with different ages/levels of kids.

At home we all sit around our table (our dining room has been repurposed as a school room) and go over subjects together. 

Let's say we're doing History. Every week I introduce a new lesson in History and then they work on projects for the remainder of the week.

I will go over the basic idea with all the kids. Then I will pull out a project for my two 2nd graders and two PreK kidlets to work on together. The six year olds help the three year olds. Still at the same table so they can be a part of the rest of the lesson. I'll go over more with my 8yo, 9yo, and 14yo. We usually have a discussion, I love discussions and we learn so much more than just repeating. Then I'll assign their project. The 8 and 9yo work together and 14yo has a more in depth project. 

With Math, it's a bit different because they are on different levels. I will normally have my older boys help the youngers with their addition/subtraction table, while I work with 14yo and preK's have some running around time. Once 14 is off and going on her own, I move to the boys while the girls have some running around time, then I'll move on to the girls while the preK's play number games.

It's all about balance and being willing to roll with it because no matter your planning things will go awry lol. 


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almondpigeon
by Member on Jul. 30, 2013 at 10:58 PM

i start the younger kid 1st and we spend an hour or so doing his grade level core subjects (math, spelling, etc...) then, the older kid joins us and we combine history, geography, science & social studies.  we take a quick break and then it's just me & the older child working on her core subjects.  arts and crafts are usually done in the afternoon and we include the toddler in that as well.  that worked well for us last year...i'm hoping to use the same method this year.  

KickButtMama
by Shannon on Jul. 31, 2013 at 5:35 PM

 For me it varies. I sometimes put the boys together and do kinda like a lecture - me reading or talking, or all of us watching a documentary. Then the boys doing a project that is geered towards their own levels. Or I used to sit the boys in the same room and I'd be between them. They'd work the same subjects (english, history, etc) at the same time, and if they need me for more than just instructions I'm there for them. Now my boys are a bit older - 12 & 9 - so they know what is expected of them. They are in seperate rooms now (less distractions) and they come to me if they have a question or need assistance.

TidewaterClan
by Kate on Sep. 3, 2013 at 9:16 AM

 I wanted to thank you for writing this.  I'm currently schooling my 3rd grader and bringing my 6th grader home this Friday.  Creating a mailbox will be their first 'team' project, and I'm hoping it works as well in our house as it does in yours.  :0)

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 I use the Beck method of vocabulary so that I can even combine literature for all of my elementary kids.  Since I then have to use quality books, they work for all of my elementary kids. 

I use a mailbox and write letters back and forth to my oldest.  That way I can spend the time talking with my youngest 2 about what we are covering while the oldest is writing me a letter.  Oldest is learning to answer questions in full sentences, writing in paragraphs, letter format, and it's FUN!

Covering the same topics in Science and history are wild because you realize that the younger ones understand much more than you would think.

Having the kids "teach" or work on flashcards or read to the younder ones gives them a bump in self-confidence, and gives you a needed break to grade a paper or respond to a letter.

 

TigerofMu
by Bronze Member on Sep. 3, 2013 at 9:41 AM

I teach four.  We do History, Geography, English, Read Aloud, Bible, all together.  The younger girls do Science together, and my high schooler does Biology.  Each child does math on her own, and uses the Instructional DVD that comes with as needed.   I spend planning time and work time with each throughout the day.

bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Sep. 3, 2013 at 10:44 AM
1 mom liked this
You are very welcome, I hope it works for you! :-)
Quoting TidewaterClan:

 I wanted to thank you for writing this.  I'm currently schooling my 3rd grader and bringing my 6th grader home this Friday.  Creating a mailbox will be their first 'team' project, and I'm hoping it works as well in our house as it does in yours.  :0)

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 I use the Beck method of vocabulary so that I can even combine literature for all of my elementary kids.  Since I then have to use quality books, they work for all of my elementary kids. 

I use a mailbox and write letters back and forth to my oldest.  That way I can spend the time talking with my youngest 2 about what we are covering while the oldest is writing me a letter.  Oldest is learning to answer questions in full sentences, writing in paragraphs, letter format, and it's FUN!

Covering the same topics in Science and history are wild because you realize that the younger ones understand much more than you would think.

Having the kids "teach" or work on flashcards or read to the younder ones gives them a bump in self-confidence, and gives you a needed break to grade a paper or respond to a letter.

 

oredeb
by debbie on Sep. 3, 2013 at 11:20 AM

 great ideas moms!!!

paganbaby
by Silver Member on Sep. 3, 2013 at 12:31 PM

That sounds the easiest.

Quoting mhaney03:

They only have separate math and English. History, science, art, and pretty much everything else is done together.


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Leissaintexas
by Bronze Member on Sep. 3, 2013 at 2:31 PM

Mine are only one grade level apart, so I worked to catch my youngest up, and slowed things down a bit for the oldest.  The only difference really was reading level, my youngest was a late reader. Everything else was easy to combine. It took me a couple of years to figure that out. Until then, I was just a really busy mom tryng to go back and forth between the two, making sure the one I wasn't working with had busy work to keep them busy while I worked with the other.

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