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 Okay ladies, what curriculum or supply do you spend the very most amount of money on?  And Why?  What is your logic behind it. 

This is curiosity so please don't bash each other's responses.

by on Aug. 26, 2013 at 7:32 AM
Replies (11-20):
AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Aug. 26, 2013 at 9:16 AM

Hmm.

For my Junior Kindergartner, it would be phonics. I have several programs, lol!

When my daughter was home, it varied. There really wasn't a reason behind it - some years certain subjects, and the materials I wanted for those subjects, tended to cost more than others. I can foresee her high school years back at home as being pricey, mostly on the science and history front.

I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Aug. 26, 2013 at 9:18 AM

 We use Math u See as our main curriculum and Life of Fred as our supplemental.  MUS is like playing with math for them.  We do a chapter in Fred each week and it catches a lot of things that most math curricula seem to miss.  I just love how he doesn't dumb down the terms for the little ones! :-)

Quoting hwblyf:

 

I use it as the main curriculum and supplement with some manipulatives and I got an origami math book and another creative learning math book.  Today we're going to work on addition facts and multiplication facts by building fact houses ("building" in the construction paper sense!).  My oldest LOVES to read, but to sit down and do math problems?  Oish, what a heartache that was!  Life of Fred he eats up.  So I go through his work and find out his weak spots and we work on those.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 

Quoting hwblyf:

Books.  Flat out, books.  My kids are readers, so they pick up a book and learn whatever is in there.  I've spent heavy on math and we bought a laptop this year, but I'm a book junkie.  So while it may be for history, it's a book.  Math?  Book.  Science?  Book.  And I never do just one book.  Never.  I need to attend some kind of meeting for this.

Subject-wise, though, it's been math and science.  I can get a lot of books at the library for reading and for history and doing projects, but I like to have the experiments at home, and I just love to have math literature.  Also, Life of Fred just isn't at the library.  And then whatever their current interests are.

 I LOVE Life of Fred!!! Do you use it as the full Curriculum or a supplement?

 

 

 

celticdragon77
by on Aug. 26, 2013 at 9:18 AM
1 mom liked this


Quoting bluerooffarm:

 

Quoting celticdragon77:

LOE - my kids were behind in reading and it seemed vital to catch them up. I like that LOE taught phonics based on all the rules. 

MCT - My kids new fave subject. This english curriculum is just beautiful.  

 What does LOE and MCT stand for?

Michael Clay Thompson (free from a good friend on here) and Logic Of English. 

I don't think a lot has to be spent though...

bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Aug. 26, 2013 at 9:20 AM

 

Quoting AutymsMommy:

Hmm.

For my Junior Kindergartner, it would be phonics. I have several programs, lol!

When my daughter was home, it varied. There really wasn't a reason behind it - some years certain subjects, and the materials I wanted for those subjects, tended to cost more than others. I can foresee her high school years back at home as being pricey, mostly on the science and history front.

 I foresee expensive science in the future!!  I already consider it one of my expensive ones and we are only at the beginning of our elementary years.

AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Aug. 26, 2013 at 9:38 AM


Elementary and middle school science wasn't pricey (a la Ellen McHenry - which my scientist hubby ADORES). I can definitely foresee high school science being pricey though. I hope to outsource it, lol, since I have no where to emulate a working lab in the house (safely, I mean, considering the two younger children).

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 

Quoting AutymsMommy:

Hmm.

For my Junior Kindergartner, it would be phonics. I have several programs, lol!

When my daughter was home, it varied. There really wasn't a reason behind it - some years certain subjects, and the materials I wanted for those subjects, tended to cost more than others. I can foresee her high school years back at home as being pricey, mostly on the science and history front.

 I foresee expensive science in the future!!  I already consider it one of my expensive ones and we are only at the beginning of our elementary years.



I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















hwblyf
by Bronze Member on Aug. 26, 2013 at 9:43 AM


The vocab is definitely awesome.  Why not introduce it young?  Set them down the right path right away.  I've thought about Math U See, but honestly, G is a tough case.  I don't think I'd be able to get him to watch a lesson.  And I was a little frustrated with the free disc they mail out, because they kept describing what they would do in a lesson, not show me an actual lesson.  I'm not really trying to get something for nothing, but his descriptions of his lesson were boring.  And there were a lot of descriptions.  G is in 5th grade, and I started him on Kidneys in January, but there was so much vocabulary that I wasn't sure he had gotten before, and he really needed to go through it again, that I just went ahead and started him and everybody else off with Apples.  He's flying through the books, and doing well, so he'll be back to Kidneys again in another month or so.  I just feel he's getting a really good foundation this way.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 We use Math u See as our main curriculum and Life of Fred as our supplemental.  MUS is like playing with math for them.  We do a chapter in Fred each week and it catches a lot of things that most math curricula seem to miss.  I just love how he doesn't dumb down the terms for the little ones! :-)

Quoting hwblyf:


I use it as the main curriculum and supplement with some manipulatives and I got an origami math book and another creative learning math book.  Today we're going to work on addition facts and multiplication facts by building fact houses ("building" in the construction paper sense!).  My oldest LOVES to read, but to sit down and do math problems?  Oish, what a heartache that was!  Life of Fred he eats up.  So I go through his work and find out his weak spots and we work on those.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 

Quoting hwblyf:

Books.  Flat out, books.  My kids are readers, so they pick up a book and learn whatever is in there.  I've spent heavy on math and we bought a laptop this year, but I'm a book junkie.  So while it may be for history, it's a book.  Math?  Book.  Science?  Book.  And I never do just one book.  Never.  I need to attend some kind of meeting for this.

Subject-wise, though, it's been math and science.  I can get a lot of books at the library for reading and for history and doing projects, but I like to have the experiments at home, and I just love to have math literature.  Also, Life of Fred just isn't at the library.  And then whatever their current interests are.

 I LOVE Life of Fred!!! Do you use it as the full Curriculum or a supplement?



 



bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Aug. 26, 2013 at 9:43 AM

 Ahhh.  Mine are all in a similar age range, so by the time we get there they will (hopefully) all understand the lab safety rules.

Quoting AutymsMommy:

 

Elementary and middle school science wasn't pricey (a la Ellen McHenry - which my scientist hubby ADORES). I can definitely foresee high school science being pricey though. I hope to outsource it, lol, since I have no where to emulate a working lab in the house (safely, I mean, considering the two younger children).

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 

Quoting AutymsMommy:

Hmm.

For my Junior Kindergartner, it would be phonics. I have several programs, lol!

When my daughter was home, it varied. There really wasn't a reason behind it - some years certain subjects, and the materials I wanted for those subjects, tended to cost more than others. I can foresee her high school years back at home as being pricey, mostly on the science and history front.

 I foresee expensive science in the future!!  I already consider it one of my expensive ones and we are only at the beginning of our elementary years.

 

 

 

bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Aug. 26, 2013 at 9:53 AM

 I have not used the videos since our first week.  The lessons in the book are well enough explained that I really didn't feel I needed the videos. 

I agree about the vocab.  I was shocked when my oldest was in PS what words they used to describe things.  Commutative property isn't some crazy out there word, so why did they need to call it the "back and forth" property?  And how in the world do you explain to the child that the back and forth property is also the up and down property when the math problem is stacked instead of a sentence.....silly!

Yes, that is giving him a Great foundation!  I started my oldest with Apples and he flew until he reached dogs.  It's really nice the way it just slows down when they reach their spot and it doesn't have mountains of busy work to slog through to get to where you ought to be.

Quoting hwblyf:

 

The vocab is definitely awesome.  Why not introduce it young?  Set them down the right path right away.  I've thought about Math U See, but honestly, G is a tough case.  I don't think I'd be able to get him to watch a lesson.  And I was a little frustrated with the free disc they mail out, because they kept describing what they would do in a lesson, not show me an actual lesson.  I'm not really trying to get something for nothing, but his descriptions of his lesson were boring.  And there were a lot of descriptions.  G is in 5th grade, and I started him on Kidneys in January, but there was so much vocabulary that I wasn't sure he had gotten before, and he really needed to go through it again, that I just went ahead and started him and everybody else off with Apples.  He's flying through the books, and doing well, so he'll be back to Kidneys again in another month or so.  I just feel he's getting a really good foundation this way.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 We use Math u See as our main curriculum and Life of Fred as our supplemental.  MUS is like playing with math for them.  We do a chapter in Fred each week and it catches a lot of things that most math curricula seem to miss.  I just love how he doesn't dumb down the terms for the little ones! :-)

Quoting hwblyf:

 

I use it as the main curriculum and supplement with some manipulatives and I got an origami math book and another creative learning math book.  Today we're going to work on addition facts and multiplication facts by building fact houses ("building" in the construction paper sense!).  My oldest LOVES to read, but to sit down and do math problems?  Oish, what a heartache that was!  Life of Fred he eats up.  So I go through his work and find out his weak spots and we work on those.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 

Quoting hwblyf:

Books.  Flat out, books.  My kids are readers, so they pick up a book and learn whatever is in there.  I've spent heavy on math and we bought a laptop this year, but I'm a book junkie.  So while it may be for history, it's a book.  Math?  Book.  Science?  Book.  And I never do just one book.  Never.  I need to attend some kind of meeting for this.

Subject-wise, though, it's been math and science.  I can get a lot of books at the library for reading and for history and doing projects, but I like to have the experiments at home, and I just love to have math literature.  Also, Life of Fred just isn't at the library.  And then whatever their current interests are.

 I LOVE Life of Fred!!! Do you use it as the full Curriculum or a supplement?

 

 

 

 

 

 

hwblyf
by Bronze Member on Aug. 26, 2013 at 9:56 AM


Maybe I'll have to revisit.  I'm just happy with Fred right now, though, so it's not a high priority.  :)  Honestly, back and forth property?  Hmm....

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 I have not used the videos since our first week.  The lessons in the book are well enough explained that I really didn't feel I needed the videos. 

I agree about the vocab.  I was shocked when my oldest was in PS what words they used to describe things.  Commutative property isn't some crazy out there word, so why did they need to call it the "back and forth" property?  And how in the world do you explain to the child that the back and forth property is also the up and down property when the math problem is stacked instead of a sentence.....silly!

Yes, that is giving him a Great foundation!  I started my oldest with Apples and he flew until he reached dogs.  It's really nice the way it just slows down when they reach their spot and it doesn't have mountains of busy work to slog through to get to where you ought to be.

Quoting hwblyf:


The vocab is definitely awesome.  Why not introduce it young?  Set them down the right path right away.  I've thought about Math U See, but honestly, G is a tough case.  I don't think I'd be able to get him to watch a lesson.  And I was a little frustrated with the free disc they mail out, because they kept describing what they would do in a lesson, not show me an actual lesson.  I'm not really trying to get something for nothing, but his descriptions of his lesson were boring.  And there were a lot of descriptions.  G is in 5th grade, and I started him on Kidneys in January, but there was so much vocabulary that I wasn't sure he had gotten before, and he really needed to go through it again, that I just went ahead and started him and everybody else off with Apples.  He's flying through the books, and doing well, so he'll be back to Kidneys again in another month or so.  I just feel he's getting a really good foundation this way.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 We use Math u See as our main curriculum and Life of Fred as our supplemental.  MUS is like playing with math for them.  We do a chapter in Fred each week and it catches a lot of things that most math curricula seem to miss.  I just love how he doesn't dumb down the terms for the little ones! :-)

Quoting hwblyf:


I use it as the main curriculum and supplement with some manipulatives and I got an origami math book and another creative learning math book.  Today we're going to work on addition facts and multiplication facts by building fact houses ("building" in the construction paper sense!).  My oldest LOVES to read, but to sit down and do math problems?  Oish, what a heartache that was!  Life of Fred he eats up.  So I go through his work and find out his weak spots and we work on those.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 

Quoting hwblyf:

Books.  Flat out, books.  My kids are readers, so they pick up a book and learn whatever is in there.  I've spent heavy on math and we bought a laptop this year, but I'm a book junkie.  So while it may be for history, it's a book.  Math?  Book.  Science?  Book.  And I never do just one book.  Never.  I need to attend some kind of meeting for this.

Subject-wise, though, it's been math and science.  I can get a lot of books at the library for reading and for history and doing projects, but I like to have the experiments at home, and I just love to have math literature.  Also, Life of Fred just isn't at the library.  And then whatever their current interests are.

 I LOVE Life of Fred!!! Do you use it as the full Curriculum or a supplement?



 



 



bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Aug. 26, 2013 at 10:01 AM

 Hey, Fred's cool!  Don't change till (unless) you need to.

Yeah, honestly the backa nd forth property.  As someone with a math concentration that nearly made my head explode. LOL

Quoting hwblyf:

 

Maybe I'll have to revisit.  I'm just happy with Fred right now, though, so it's not a high priority.  :)  Honestly, back and forth property?  Hmm....

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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