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Do you use grades? (Plus article)

Posted by on Aug. 26, 2013 at 2:15 PM
  • 26 Replies
Article http://www.education.com/magazine/article/Grades_Any_Good/
by on Aug. 26, 2013 at 2:15 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Leissaintexas
by Bronze Member on Aug. 26, 2013 at 2:25 PM
I can't read the article, but I have never used grades.
hipmomto3
by Bronze Member on Aug. 26, 2013 at 2:31 PM
1 mom liked this

Here it's clicky:

http://www.education.com/magazine/article/Grades_Any_Good/

We only do grades for math, just for tracking percentage right/wrong. If they get less than 90% on an assessment, I'll repeat a lesson or do extra work (worksheets, online games) on that area. But for all other subject areas, we do not do grades. And even math grades aren't a big deal - half the time the kids don't know or care what their grade was! 

bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Aug. 26, 2013 at 2:37 PM
1 mom liked this

 I feel that I do not give grades, but i do grade papers.  When my kids get more than 87% correct we can move on to the next topic.  On the other hand, if something is totally not clicking with them I might move on to the next topic anyway and come back later with a new way of learning the thing they had trouble doing. 

I personally disagree with the assessment that the implementation of the grades don't matter.  I think when grades are not subjective and they are not used as the end-all-be-all of the system that they can be a tool to see how much the child retains.  But much of that can actually be done without the child's knowledge, oral testing, oral discussions with a checklist (even a mental one) to determine whether they "get" the subject or not.

usmom3
by BJ on Aug. 26, 2013 at 2:41 PM

 Nope we don't use grades or test!

hwblyf
by Silver Member on Aug. 26, 2013 at 2:49 PM
2 moms liked this


Right, but then you're not grading, you're assessing.  Which you already know, but the difference screams to some people.  I don't like my kids working for a grade, nor do I like all the workbooks that tout they have the ability to enhance my child's test scores.  I want my kids to understand and be able to do the skills required.  I struggle with this because I don't grade, which somewhat freaks me out, but I want them to keep the knowledge and ability beyond the test time, beyond that snapshot.  So get rid of the snapshot and keep the big picture.  Or something like that.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 I feel that I do not give grades, but i do grade papers.  When my kids get more than 87% correct we can move on to the next topic.  On the other hand, if something is totally not clicking with them I might move on to the next topic anyway and come back later with a new way of learning the thing they had trouble doing. 

I personally disagree with the assessment that the implementation of the grades don't matter.  I think when grades are not subjective and they are not used as the end-all-be-all of the system that they can be a tool to see how much the child retains.  But much of that can actually be done without the child's knowledge, oral testing, oral discussions with a checklist (even a mental one) to determine whether they "get" the subject or not.



Chasing3
by Bronze Member on Aug. 26, 2013 at 2:51 PM

I will "keep track" because my distric requires me to submit a progress report card. But no, I don't do grades. All 3 of my kids have been in PS up until now and I've always told them I don't think grades matter. I made no fanfare over report cards and often didn't read them until days later. I'd make a point of showing them that I was signing the return slip without even reading them.

That said, I am proud of my high grades in college and grad school. I will also prep my kids for the SAT if they plan to attend college. Sometimes you just have to play the game.

I love Alfie Kohn and have read all his books.

bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Aug. 26, 2013 at 2:56 PM
1 mom liked this

 You're right I am assessing, but with the way the article said not to even associate a letter or number with a paper, I wanted to clarify as much as possible.  My kids all say they don't get grades, so I mustn't display it to them.  We also keep the big picture by the old stuff showing up on the newer assessments.

Quoting hwblyf:

 

Right, but then you're not grading, you're assessing.  Which you already know, but the difference screams to some people.  I don't like my kids working for a grade, nor do I like all the workbooks that tout they have the ability to enhance my child's test scores.  I want my kids to understand and be able to do the skills required.  I struggle with this because I don't grade, which somewhat freaks me out, but I want them to keep the knowledge and ability beyond the test time, beyond that snapshot.  So get rid of the snapshot and keep the big picture.  Or something like that.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 I feel that I do not give grades, but i do grade papers.  When my kids get more than 87% correct we can move on to the next topic.  On the other hand, if something is totally not clicking with them I might move on to the next topic anyway and come back later with a new way of learning the thing they had trouble doing. 

I personally disagree with the assessment that the implementation of the grades don't matter.  I think when grades are not subjective and they are not used as the end-all-be-all of the system that they can be a tool to see how much the child retains.  But much of that can actually be done without the child's knowledge, oral testing, oral discussions with a checklist (even a mental one) to determine whether they "get" the subject or not.

 

 

 

oredeb
by on Aug. 26, 2013 at 3:05 PM
1 mom liked this

for us i dont grade, never seen it do any good or help know the subject better and i know how the kids are doing already, so i dont do it but for some people its great, just depends on the person

debramommyof4
by Silver Member on Aug. 26, 2013 at 4:26 PM

 I grade papers so I can see how the kids are doing. If they are making mistakes because they are going to fast, I ask them to slow down and try again.  I do not really grade for grades, just so I can make sure they can do the work and if they need to slow down.  Sometimes if the work is easy they speed through and do not pay attention.  So this helps me slow them down.

Quoting hwblyf:

 

Right, but then you're not grading, you're assessing.  Which you already know, but the difference screams to some people.  I don't like my kids working for a grade, nor do I like all the workbooks that tout they have the ability to enhance my child's test scores.  I want my kids to understand and be able to do the skills required.  I struggle with this because I don't grade, which somewhat freaks me out, but I want them to keep the knowledge and ability beyond the test time, beyond that snapshot.  So get rid of the snapshot and keep the big picture.  Or something like that.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 I feel that I do not give grades, but i do grade papers.  When my kids get more than 87% correct we can move on to the next topic.  On the other hand, if something is totally not clicking with them I might move on to the next topic anyway and come back later with a new way of learning the thing they had trouble doing. 

I personally disagree with the assessment that the implementation of the grades don't matter.  I think when grades are not subjective and they are not used as the end-all-be-all of the system that they can be a tool to see how much the child retains.  But much of that can actually be done without the child's knowledge, oral testing, oral discussions with a checklist (even a mental one) to determine whether they "get" the subject or not.

 

 

 

hwblyf
by Silver Member on Aug. 26, 2013 at 4:33 PM


But then, are you really grading, or merely going through their work?  There's a huge difference, especially in perception.  QAing their work needs to be done, why have them do the work otherwise?  But giving a judgment to it (a grade)....is that necessary?  With math and science I think it's a little easier, the question is right or wrong.  With writing, there's a lot to work with, and it's subjective the weight that you put on something vs another thing.  My oldest's 2nd grade teacher hated his writing voice, and I happen to love it.  I encouraged him to ignore her on that for that entire year because it's a subjective thing.  Does this make sense?

Quoting debramommyof4:

 I grade papers so I can see how the kids are doing. If they are making mistakes because they are going to fast, I ask them to slow down and try again.  I do not really grade for grades, just so I can make sure they can do the work and if they need to slow down.  Sometimes if the work is easy they speed through and do not pay attention.  So this helps me slow them down.

Quoting hwblyf:


Right, but then you're not grading, you're assessing.  Which you already know, but the difference screams to some people.  I don't like my kids working for a grade, nor do I like all the workbooks that tout they have the ability to enhance my child's test scores.  I want my kids to understand and be able to do the skills required.  I struggle with this because I don't grade, which somewhat freaks me out, but I want them to keep the knowledge and ability beyond the test time, beyond that snapshot.  So get rid of the snapshot and keep the big picture.  Or something like that.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 I feel that I do not give grades, but i do grade papers.  When my kids get more than 87% correct we can move on to the next topic.  On the other hand, if something is totally not clicking with them I might move on to the next topic anyway and come back later with a new way of learning the thing they had trouble doing. 

I personally disagree with the assessment that the implementation of the grades don't matter.  I think when grades are not subjective and they are not used as the end-all-be-all of the system that they can be a tool to see how much the child retains.  But much of that can actually be done without the child's knowledge, oral testing, oral discussions with a checklist (even a mental one) to determine whether they "get" the subject or not.



 



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