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Reading-dyslexia

Posted by on Aug. 27, 2013 at 4:57 AM
  • 12 Replies

Hi, I am Rebecca. I mostly lurk and read when I get a chance. I have 4 kids ages almost 10, 6, 3, and 1. My 6 and 3 year olds are high functioning autistic. 


My 6 year old, during her developmental testing for autism, was noted to be at risk for a reading disorder or dyslexia. I have her in first grade. She is not able to read independently, and what she can read she struggles big time with. Phonics are difficult for her. Sight words are easier, but still difficult. Right now we are finishing up Explode the Code ABC books and will move into the next books when she is done. We also read BOB books together.

Does any one have experience home schooling a child with dyslexia? Can you recommend a reading curriculum? Do you have any advice? Should I look into hiring a tutor for her to learn to read?

She was just diagnosed today with asd and so she is only currently getting speech therapy and we are in the works to get her set up with aba. 

by on Aug. 27, 2013 at 4:57 AM
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Replies (1-10):
mem82
by Platinum Member on Aug. 27, 2013 at 8:30 AM
Bump! Autymsmommy has homeschooled her daughter, who is dyslexic. 8) good luck
KrissyKC
by Silver Member on Aug. 27, 2013 at 10:16 AM

The only advice I have heard is this....

Use paper or something to block the lines above and the lines below.   It's harder on a dyslexic to read when there are multiple lines in their sight.


AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Aug. 27, 2013 at 11:37 AM

I highly recommend Apples and Pears spelling and their sister reading program Dancing Bears.

(yes, I have a dyslexic child - my 12 year old dd)

I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















03071012
by Member on Aug. 27, 2013 at 12:08 PM


Thank you. I will check this out.  

Quoting AutymsMommy:

I highly recommend Apples and Pears spelling and their sister reading program Dancing Bears.

(yes, I have a dyslexic child - my 12 year old dd)



AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Aug. 27, 2013 at 12:24 PM
I'll be back in a bit. Mobile.
AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Aug. 27, 2013 at 2:33 PM

Seton press also sells colored overlays, which could be a tremendous help with reading.

I do *not* use OG with my dyslexic; it would have been a nightmare with her. The reason Apples and Pears/Dancing Bears works better for her is because she's a visual learner.

I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















ambertreas76
by on Aug. 27, 2013 at 2:59 PM
1 mom liked this

This may sound super weird but I'll tell ya anyway.  I'm dyslexic, my little brother is dyslexic and my 5 yr old son is dyslexic.  Anyways, when I was a child I would listen to music while doing schoolwork.  The reason is something I didn't understand until very recently.  As a teenager, I was the person who taught my brother to write his name once my mother got frustrated and couldn't handle the confusion of the dyslexic mind.  How?  Well, music.  I played classical or sang calming songs while he wrote.  It was exactly what I would do while I did my schoolwork.  Now we are in present day.  My son is doing great.  How?  Well, I sing while we do schoolwork.  I began with frustration and worry that I had a dyslexic child and the 'whats' and 'hows' of teaching.  Then memory kicked in... thank God!

I read an article not too long ago about music and the dyslexic mind.  It taps into a part of the mind which may distort thinking.  For our family, soothing music helps a great deal.  No more confused backwards letters, no more backwards answers, etc .

Good luck to you, sweetie!   

kirbymom
by Sonja on Aug. 27, 2013 at 3:09 PM
Hi Rebecca. :)
I am dyslexic but have never bought any type of program for it either for myself or my kids. I had to struggle to learn how to read when I was little and therefore I just taught my kids from those struggles.
As I read your post, I went looking for some answers for you and think this link might be a bit of a help to you.

http://dyslexiahelp.umich.edu/professionals/dyslexia-school/reading-comprehension
03071012
by Member on Aug. 27, 2013 at 7:01 PM
1 mom liked this

This makes a lot of sense to me. My 3 year old does listening therapy with her OT and I could totally see how it would help with dyslexia.  I am going to give it a try with my 6 year old. 

Quoting ambertreas76:

This may sound super weird but I'll tell ya anyway.  I'm dyslexic, my little brother is dyslexic and my 5 yr old son is dyslexic.  Anyways, when I was a child I would listen to music while doing schoolwork.  The reason is something I didn't understand until very recently.  As a teenager, I was the person who taught my brother to write his name once my mother got frustrated and couldn't handle the confusion of the dyslexic mind.  How?  Well, music.  I played classical or sang calming songs while he wrote.  It was exactly what I would do while I did my schoolwork.  Now we are in present day.  My son is doing great.  How?  Well, I sing while we do schoolwork.  I began with frustration and worry that I had a dyslexic child and the 'whats' and 'hows' of teaching.  Then memory kicked in... thank God!

I read an article not too long ago about music and the dyslexic mind.  It taps into a part of the mind which may distort thinking.  For our family, soothing music helps a great deal.  No more confused backwards letters, no more backwards answers, etc .

Good luck to you, sweetie!   



03071012
by Member on Aug. 27, 2013 at 7:02 PM


My dd is a visual learner. Once I can get on a computer I will look this up. 

Quoting AutymsMommy:

Seton press also sells colored overlays, which could be a tremendous help with reading.

I do *not* use OG with my dyslexic; it would have been a nightmare with her. The reason Apples and Pears/Dancing Bears works better for her is because she's a visual learner.



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