Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Why I Do NOT Care About Teaching My Toddler about Letters, Shapes and Colors

Posted by on Sep. 4, 2013 at 1:01 PM
BJ
  • 29 Replies
2 moms liked this

 I thought this was good & wanted to share it with all of you! CLICK TO READ

by on Sep. 4, 2013 at 1:01 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
xomrs.chase
by Member on Sep. 4, 2013 at 1:10 PM
1 mom liked this
I get where she's going, but I'm undecided on how I feel about the post as a whole.
SalemWitchChild
by on Sep. 4, 2013 at 1:17 PM
1 mom liked this

Yeah I so do not agree with her. It's not only impoverished or third world countries that have issues with reading and writing. And I would not want to set my child up for embarrassment if he is not on the same level as his peers when school does start. I understand not forcing the issue, but a certain level of teaching is a must imo to prepare them.

Leissaintexas
by Bronze Member on Sep. 4, 2013 at 1:31 PM
2 moms liked this

I agree completely! When my youngest was little, I was more concerned with his growth as a compassionate, kind person who would share and contribute to our household. I never taught anything at all till age 5. Guess what? He knew all his colors and shapes. The above reply about being on the same level as other kids to avoid embarrasment is really a sad commentary on our society when even small children are competing for "who is best/smartest/ fastest etc.I've taught my children to not care how they stack up againt strangers. Its kind of pointless. When you're an adult, no person will ever ask you how old you were when you learned the difference between a blue circle and an orange square. No one ever asks hwo old a person was when they learned to read, or tie shoes, or went potty. So why are we trying so hard to cram academics down our toddlers' throats? 

AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Sep. 4, 2013 at 1:48 PM
1 mom liked this

Meh. I disagree with her.

We have a blast with those "abstract" concepts and information (as she refers to them).

I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















usmom3
by BJ on Sep. 4, 2013 at 2:13 PM
2 moms liked this

 This Mom is not saying learning numbers letters & shapes are never important she is saying that they are not the most important thing while the child is so young that helping them learn to be emotionally stable & good people is more important at that stage of their development because the personalty in children is formed at that stage & is concreted in by the age of 7. Can a child change & become a compassionate, emotionally stable person at an older age yes they can but it is in the child's best interest to learn it at a younger age so that they don't have to fix themselves latter.

Like Leissaintexas said no one asks you about what age you learned what as an adult, what matters is did you learn what you need to know to make it in  life. Unfortunately there are way to many adults that did not learn how to deal with there emotions as children or how to be in a relationship with out treating the others like trash. Those things can only be changed if the individual wishes to change them. There are many emotionally damaged adults that think they are just fine having children that they are emotionally damaging because they don't know how to help them learn to deal with there emotions!

hwblyf
by Bronze Member on Sep. 4, 2013 at 2:55 PM


But from what you've posted in the past, we also know that you focus on character/empathy/humanity with your children.  And I think, from my take on the post, that she was saying those are the things we should be emphasizing, not simply knowledge.  You guys get to do it all.  :)

Quoting AutymsMommy:

Meh. I disagree with her.

We have a blast with those "abstract" concepts and information (as she refers to them).



hipmomto3
by Bronze Member on Sep. 4, 2013 at 2:59 PM
A friend posted it yesterday on FB. I didn't comment there, but I really didn't care for it. I mean, obvs, I get what she's saying. Academics aren't all that matters and *some parents* push that way too hard. On the other hand, we are preparing these little people to be functioning adults. Not just in the ways of interpersonal relationships and empathy. They need to be able to succeed in their occupations, to be competitive for employment, and all that mainstream boring jazz no one likes to think about... we'd rather think we can chase butterflies and bake bread all day and our kids will turn out to be just super awesome people (but never so prideful or aggressive as to admit their own super awesomeness!). It's just not true.
AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Sep. 4, 2013 at 3:11 PM
I didn't take that from the article, I suppose. Like another poster, it read to me that academics shouldn't get any place on the priority pole. Given, this could be because the author appears to be more of an unschooler and I'm definitely not, so I may have misinterpreted it with a sour taste in my mouth ;)


Quoting hwblyf:


But from what you've posted in the past, we also know that you focus on character/empathy/humanity with your children.  And I think, from my take on the post, that she was saying those are the things we should be emphasizing, not simply knowledge.  You guys get to do it all.  :)


Quoting AutymsMommy:

Meh. I disagree with her.

We have a blast with those "abstract" concepts and information (as she refers to them).





hwblyf
by Bronze Member on Sep. 4, 2013 at 3:19 PM
1 mom liked this

Whereas I got bummed because I am having a slew of difficult days and my kids' personalities are basically set by the time they're 7 so I've totally screwed them up and they're going to have a tough time changing and getting it right themselves cuz they had me as a mom, who is not patient or awesome like the author.  But that's just the place I'm in right now.


Quoting AutymsMommy:

I didn't take that from the article, I suppose. Like another poster, it read to me that academics shouldn't get any place on the priority pole. Given, this could be because the author appears to be more of an unschooler and I'm definitely not, so I may have misinterpreted it with a sour taste in my mouth ;)


Quoting hwblyf:


But from what you've posted in the past, we also know that you focus on character/empathy/humanity with your children.  And I think, from my take on the post, that she was saying those are the things we should be emphasizing, not simply knowledge.  You guys get to do it all.  :)


Quoting AutymsMommy:

Meh. I disagree with her.

We have a blast with those "abstract" concepts and information (as she refers to them).







hwblyf
by Bronze Member on Sep. 4, 2013 at 3:21 PM


I do bake bread and chase butterflies all day and my husband would tell you (but I would never put it out there) that I'm super awesome.

I'm sorry....was that a bit much?  :)

Quoting hipmomto3:

A friend posted it yesterday on FB. I didn't comment there, but I really didn't care for it. I mean, obvs, I get what she's saying. Academics aren't all that matters and *some parents* push that way too hard. On the other hand, we are preparing these little people to be functioning adults. Not just in the ways of interpersonal relationships and empathy. They need to be able to succeed in their occupations, to be competitive for employment, and all that mainstream boring jazz no one likes to think about... we'd rather think we can chase butterflies and bake bread all day and our kids will turn out to be just super awesome people (but never so prideful or aggressive as to admit their own super awesomeness!). It's just not true.



Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)