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Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

does this seem excessive to you?

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an acquaintance of mine is homeschooling her pre-k aged kid.  my idea of pre-k is very laid back and non-structured.  according to her facebook, she is spending 4ish hours a day.   that's the amount of time it takes for me to 2nd grade.  my kindergartener only spends an hour-ish each day.  now, i'm wondering if i'm not spending enough time.  

how long do you spend each day on lower grades?

(even though i'm in my 3rd year of hsing, i always second guess myself)

by on Sep. 6, 2013 at 10:07 AM
Replies (11-20):
Leissaintexas
by Bronze Member on Sep. 6, 2013 at 11:37 AM
1 mom liked this

My 6th and 7th graders spend about 4 hours on school. I think spending that much time on pre k is a bit excessive.

candiedgala
by on Sep. 6, 2013 at 11:47 AM
2 moms liked this
I'm planning a long preschool day, but it includes outdoor time and just about every lesson is less school and more guided play. It's really more geared toward my commitment to making opportunities for her. So, even though the school time is technically long it isn't a heavy workload.
debramommyof4
by Silver Member on Sep. 6, 2013 at 12:27 PM
1 mom liked this

 My preschoolers spend about 30 or 40 minutes.  My older 2 as preschoolers took about 2 to 3 hours when they were preschoolers.  It really depends on the kids. 

Since my oldest started kindergarten we have done 4 to 5 hours a day, but there is lots of stuff we have done that is just lots of fun.

celticdragon77
by on Sep. 6, 2013 at 12:32 PM
1 mom liked this

Everyone does things differently. You have to do what works for your family.

BrettsMommy927
by on Sep. 6, 2013 at 12:35 PM
1 mom liked this

my pre-k, was in public school, but he was at home for kindergarten, and we did about 2 hrs a day. Now were up to 4.

usmom3
by BJ on Sep. 6, 2013 at 1:00 PM
2 moms liked this

 We just played & learned through life when they where that age!

AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Sep. 6, 2013 at 1:31 PM

Not excessive at all to me. We do about 3 hours for pre-k; we would do more if my babe would allow it, lol.

*shrug* Everyone does things differently. We have a blast with it.

When my eldest was home, she was about about 6 or so hours for grade 6.

I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Sep. 6, 2013 at 1:34 PM

That is relative, at best.

If we want to assert that all children are individuals with different personalities, we need to come to terms with the fact that some children do not learn best through play and that some very young children thrive with a rigorous (but still fun!), formal, structured approach.


Quoting hipmomto3:

My 1st and 2nd graders spend 60-90 minutes per day on "book work." That is, their math, language arts, etc type stuff - but if I add up all the other bits of 'school' we do throughout the day (extra curriculars, sports, art class, scouts, gardening, family scripture study, reading aloud to them as a group, educational videos, and bedtime reading together), it comes out to about 3 to 3.5 hours per day. 

My 5th grader does all the extra stuff as well, but spends about 2.5 - 4 hours per day on book work. Just depends on the day and how motivated she is to finish. :)

If she's spending 4 hours a day it just depends how much of that is 'book' time. IMO that shouldn't be more than 30 minutes before K. Children under age 7 learn best through play and they just need lots of opportunities to do that - the parent-teacher's main job is to provide opportunities and materials for them to learn and experience.



I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















hipmomto3
by Bronze Member on Sep. 6, 2013 at 3:04 PM

Le sigh, AutymsMommy. Sometimes I feel like you nitpick people's responses just to find something to argue about.

Yes, all children are individuals.

Yes, some children adore workbooks and more power to 'em! My youngest loves workbooks and goes through so many, I get tired of buying them!

But science has shown that the development of a child's brain between birth and age three, and again from ages three through six, responds best to open-ended learning, not the typical brick & mortar school approach of lined paper and copywork. Building things, climbing, jumping, making up games, reading, exploring, writing, drawing - parents should utilize all modes of learning early on to best know where their children will excel. There's really no need to argue with stating that children learn through play, or that parents should provide their children with opportunities to play. It's not relative. It's common sense and proven by leaders of many approaches to education - not pragmatism by any means, but Reggio-Emilia, Montessori, Waldorf, even the entire system of education in some countries.


Quoting AutymsMommy:

That is relative, at best.

If we want to assert that all children are individuals with different personalities, we need to come to terms with the fact that some children do not learn best through play and that some very young children thrive with a rigorous (but still fun!), formal, structured approach.


Quoting hipmomto3:

My 1st and 2nd graders spend 60-90 minutes per day on "book work." That is, their math, language arts, etc type stuff - but if I add up all the other bits of 'school' we do throughout the day (extra curriculars, sports, art class, scouts, gardening, family scripture study, reading aloud to them as a group, educational videos, and bedtime reading together), it comes out to about 3 to 3.5 hours per day. 

My 5th grader does all the extra stuff as well, but spends about 2.5 - 4 hours per day on book work. Just depends on the day and how motivated she is to finish. :)

If she's spending 4 hours a day it just depends how much of that is 'book' time. IMO that shouldn't be more than 30 minutes before K. Children under age 7 learn best through play and they just need lots of opportunities to do that - the parent-teacher's main job is to provide opportunities and materials for them to learn and experience.





AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Sep. 6, 2013 at 3:32 PM

I *do* nitpick - personality flaw, lol.

Science also has shown that children are virtual sponges at those ages and that it is prime time to teach things like a second language, and memory reflected material (they have an amazing capacity to memorize).

Remember that we all subscribe to different philosophies. Montessori and Waldorf do not impress me, on a personal level, so I'm not going to subscribe to their assertions about child development, kwim?

Do I think children do learn by open ended exploration? CERTAINLY. I also believe they can and do learn with formal academics (and believe that if it's tedious, you're doing it wrong).


Quoting hipmomto3:

Le sigh, AutymsMommy. Sometimes I feel like you nitpick people's responses just to find something to argue about.

Yes, all children are individuals.

Yes, some children adore workbooks and more power to 'em! My youngest loves workbooks and goes through so many, I get tired of buying them!

But science has shown that the development of a child's brain between birth and age three, and again from ages three through six, responds best to open-ended learning, not the typical brick & mortar school approach of lined paper and copywork. Building things, climbing, jumping, making up games, reading, exploring, writing, drawing - parents should utilize all modes of learning early on to best know where their children will excel. There's really no need to argue with stating that children learn through play, or that parents should provide their children with opportunities to play. It's not relative. It's common sense and proven by leaders of many approaches to education - not pragmatism by any means, but Reggio-Emilia, Montessori, Waldorf, even the entire system of education in some countries.


Quoting AutymsMommy:

That is relative, at best.

If we want to assert that all children are individuals with different personalities, we need to come to terms with the fact that some children do not learn best through play and that some very young children thrive with a rigorous (but still fun!), formal, structured approach.


Quoting hipmomto3:

My 1st and 2nd graders spend 60-90 minutes per day on "book work." That is, their math, language arts, etc type stuff - but if I add up all the other bits of 'school' we do throughout the day (extra curriculars, sports, art class, scouts, gardening, family scripture study, reading aloud to them as a group, educational videos, and bedtime reading together), it comes out to about 3 to 3.5 hours per day. 

My 5th grader does all the extra stuff as well, but spends about 2.5 - 4 hours per day on book work. Just depends on the day and how motivated she is to finish. :)

If she's spending 4 hours a day it just depends how much of that is 'book' time. IMO that shouldn't be more than 30 minutes before K. Children under age 7 learn best through play and they just need lots of opportunities to do that - the parent-teacher's main job is to provide opportunities and materials for them to learn and experience.







I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















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