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special needs children?

Posted by on Sep. 6, 2013 at 9:58 PM
  • 14 Replies
Ok, so we dont have a diagnosis yet, but my 7 yr old most likely has sensory processing disorder. We are going to evaluate him.

Anyways, right now we are having such a hard time. It feels like things are so much worse. Maybe its adjusting to a newborn, now sure. We actually are ok on.doing school work. I make sure to do it when everyone is happy, and we stop if there is a metldown. My question is, what are some tips for preventing these huge meltdowns? Or any other tips you may have for me?
by on Sep. 6, 2013 at 9:58 PM
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Replies (1-10):
hwblyf
by Silver Member on Sep. 6, 2013 at 10:14 PM

I have a friend who takes her 3 to OT and gets exercises and such, plus they've modified their diet extensively.  I've not gone that route with my guy, but we modify a LOT of what we do.  There are some really good books out there, though you've probably tried a ton.  If not, here are some that I've read (not spd specific):

Living with Intensity
Lost at School
Wild Things

Wow, those are the only ones that came to my head.  I've read many more, though.  Sometimes the meltdowns aren't avoidable, though I'm not an expert.  My favorite thing that I took away from Lost at School is that if a child COULD do better, he WOULD.  Not a soul wants to be a failure.  No one is out to do the worst that he could.  That helps me tons when I'm in the middle of yuck. 

usmom3
by BJ on Sep. 6, 2013 at 10:39 PM

 To avoid them I make sure that he is feed, hydrated, well rested, that I explain everything & make sure he understands what is going to happen. Some other things are I have to let him adjust to changes that might pop up unexspectedly & sometimes he needs the meltdown to help the process so I try to be patient with him, he will apologize after the fact & I try to always let him know that I understand that sometimes this is just how he processes what is happening.

He still has melt downs daily on most days but if I can keep my cool & stay calm they can be over in as little as a minute. He is 8 & every year he gets better at controlling himself & processing what is going on.

My oldest that turned 20 on Tuesday used to be the same as my 8y/o but he has grown to control it. He still has the occasional melt down but for him it looks a lot like teen-aged attitude, if we just let him go off alone to process he can get over one pretty fast!

Precious333
by Silver Member on Sep. 6, 2013 at 10:39 PM
Thank you!

I need to get a hold of these books! :)

Hopefully he will be getting OT as well.


Quoting hwblyf:

I have a friend who takes her 3 to OT and gets exercises and such, plus they've modified their diet extensively.  I've not gone that route with my guy, but we modify a LOT of what we do.  There are some really good books out there, though you've probably tried a ton.  If not, here are some that I've read (not spd specific):

Living with Intensity
Lost at School
Wild Things

Wow, those are the only ones that came to my head.  I've read many more, though.  Sometimes the meltdowns aren't avoidable, though I'm not an expert.  My favorite thing that I took away from Lost at School is that if a child COULD do better, he WOULD.  Not a soul wants to be a failure.  No one is out to do the worst that he could.  That helps me tons when I'm in the middle of yuck. 


Precious333
by Silver Member on Sep. 6, 2013 at 10:42 PM
Thanks! I guess i need to not worry too much about the meltdowns. After he always apologizes, so tyats a good sign. It juat seems like they are becoming more frequent and thats what worries me.


Quoting usmom3:

 To avoid them I make sure that he is feed, hydrated, well rested, that I explain everything & make sure he understands what is going to happen. Some other things are I have to let him adjust to changes that might pop up unexspectedly & sometimes he needs the meltdown to help the process so I try to be patient with him, he will apologize after the fact & I try to always let him know that I understand that sometimes this is just how he processes what is happening.


He still has melt downs daily on most days but if I can keep my cool & stay calm they can be over in as little as a minute. He is 8 & every year he gets better at controlling himself & processing what is going on.


My oldest that turned 20 on Tuesday used to be the same as my 8y/o but he has grown to control it. He still has the occasional melt down but for him it looks a lot like teen-aged attitude, if we just let him go off alone to process he can get over one pretty fast!


usmom3
by BJ on Sep. 6, 2013 at 11:00 PM

 

 When ever some big change happens at our house both of my sons have a hard time dealing with it. The youngest has more melt downs & my oldest behaves like a very depressed teen (I have come to the realization that this is one of his kinds of meltdown as an adult Autistic the other one is like I stated before)

If I where you I would focus on letting everyone adjust to the new baby & slowly build back to what your life was before baby.

Quoting Precious333:

Thanks! I guess i need to not worry too much about the meltdowns. After he always apologizes, so tyats a good sign. It juat seems like they are becoming more frequent and thats what worries me.


Quoting usmom3:

 To avoid them I make sure that he is feed, hydrated, well rested, that I explain everything & make sure he understands what is going to happen. Some other things are I have to let him adjust to changes that might pop up unexspectedly & sometimes he needs the meltdown to help the process so I try to be patient with him, he will apologize after the fact & I try to always let him know that I understand that sometimes this is just how he processes what is happening.


He still has melt downs daily on most days but if I can keep my cool & stay calm they can be over in as little as a minute. He is 8 & every year he gets better at controlling himself & processing what is going on.


My oldest that turned 20 on Tuesday used to be the same as my 8y/o but he has grown to control it. He still has the occasional melt down but for him it looks a lot like teen-aged attitude, if we just let him go off alone to process he can get over one pretty fast!


 

mommy4lyf
by on Sep. 6, 2013 at 11:02 PM

I started with more breaks. Watch his diet. If you can avoid it...don't give him anything with food color. Ask him what he wants to do first. Mine loves to draw so that is his warm up activity before math.

bmw29
by Member on Sep. 6, 2013 at 11:07 PM
What symptoms stick out? Is he sensory seeking or is he more sensitive? I have a few SPD books I liked.

The out of synch child and Sensational kids are both good.
Precious333
by Silver Member on Sep. 6, 2013 at 11:34 PM
Its so hard since she.came right before school.began! I expected the younger ones to hacr a hard time, but my oldest by far has been the one having the hardest time. we are apart of a charter school, so we have to do a certain number of school days (i have been relying on netflix a lot), plus i am the director of their classes that will br meeting in two weeks! So hard to slow.down!


Quoting usmom3:

 


 When ever some big change happens at our house both of my sons have a hard time dealing with it. The youngest has more melt downs & my oldest behaves like a very depressed teen (I have come to the realization that this is one of his kinds of meltdown as an adult Autistic the other one is like I stated before)


If I where you I would focus on letting everyone adjust to the new baby & slowly build back to what your life was before baby.


Quoting Precious333:

Thanks! I guess i need to not worry too much about the meltdowns. After he always apologizes, so tyats a good sign. It juat seems like they are becoming more frequent and thats what worries me.



Quoting usmom3:


 To avoid them I make sure that he is feed, hydrated, well rested, that I explain everything & make sure he understands what is going to happen. Some other things are I have to let him adjust to changes that might pop up unexspectedly & sometimes he needs the meltdown to help the process so I try to be patient with him, he will apologize after the fact & I try to always let him know that I understand that sometimes this is just how he processes what is happening.



He still has melt downs daily on most days but if I can keep my cool & stay calm they can be over in as little as a minute. He is 8 & every year he gets better at controlling himself & processing what is going on.



My oldest that turned 20 on Tuesday used to be the same as my 8y/o but he has grown to control it. He still has the occasional melt down but for him it looks a lot like teen-aged attitude, if we just let him go off alone to process he can get over one pretty fast!



 


Precious333
by Silver Member on Sep. 6, 2013 at 11:37 PM
Thanks! We have tried takinf out certain foods, never noticed a difference, so we stopped. But i look out for that. Thanks!


Quoting mommy4lyf:

I started with more breaks. Watch his diet. If you can avoid it...don't give him anything with food color. Ask him what he wants to do first. Mine loves to draw so that is his warm up activity before math.


Precious333
by Silver Member on Sep. 6, 2013 at 11:39 PM
Oh yes, i have heard of the out of synch child!

He had a bit if both. He is sensitive to noises, smells and certain clothing, but he is very touchy feely too, likes close contact witg people. He is very sensitivr emotionally as well.


Quoting bmw29:

What symptoms stick out? Is he sensory seeking or is he more sensitive? I have a few SPD books I liked.



The out of synch child and Sensational kids are both good.

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