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I think I am done

Posted by on Sep. 7, 2013 at 10:32 PM
  • 16 Replies
My oldest kiddo is in 7th grade and was bullied a bit last year and so we pulled her out this year it has been just over a month she is not motivated and will not get anything done. Then my son acts like he is a miserable as can be I have tried games projects everything else that I can think of. Please help with some ideas.
by on Sep. 7, 2013 at 10:32 PM
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maggiemom2000
by Member on Sep. 7, 2013 at 10:39 PM

What are their interests?

What kind of curriculum are you using?

What motivates them or gets them excited or engaged in general?

ablackdolphin
by Bronze Member on Sep. 7, 2013 at 11:15 PM

What programs are you using? Sometimes I think the right program can make all the difference.

KickButtMama
by Shannon on Sep. 8, 2013 at 1:01 AM

I completely agree. The right program for each child makes a Huge difference. My kids do much better with independant and child-led learning and they look forward to learning with their friends at co-op. But, when we first started, I went through this stage of trying to replicate the public school in my house - heave worksheets, tests, tight schedules, lectures, the whole nine yards....and it was an Epic Fail! 

Quoting ablackdolphin:

What programs are you using? Sometimes I think the right program can make all the difference.


  Articles / Kicbuttmama's Crazy Lapbooks / Kickbuttmama's Home Education / KBM Creations  / Pintrest
Albert Einstein -- 
   "Everybody is a Genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will spend its whole life believing it is stupid." 

PurpleCupcake
by Cynthia on Sep. 8, 2013 at 8:36 AM
1 mom liked this

Curriculum is important. But so is learning style. What kind of learners are your kids?







HOMESCHOOL! Where Zombie Tinker Bell is Art!


KrissyKC
by Silver Member on Sep. 8, 2013 at 9:15 AM
3 moms liked this

When u pulled her, you should have taken a break for a while.  Discussed their interests, went places, looked for homeschool groups, etc.

tuffymama
by Bronze Member on Sep. 8, 2013 at 9:28 AM
1 mom liked this
Maybe deschool for a while? I would. ODS had to, when I w/d him.
Are they bullheaded about chores, too? Do they otherwise respect and obey you? If it is only the schooling part that causes fights, recalcitrance, and laziness, then you can deschool for a while. During that time, you can identify what kinds of learners they are and tailor the teaching/curriculum to them. If they are just generally loutish layabouts concerning chores and everything else you tell them to do that isn't "fun," then a CTJ and parenting/family overhaul is in order. There is no shame in that, either.
Leissaintexas
by Bronze Member on Sep. 8, 2013 at 10:19 AM
1 mom liked this
At that age, school has already killed their love of learning. Its not going to be easy to get it back.its going to take some deschooling and letting them choose as much of their own curriculum as possible. Give them plenty of time to just get over the damage school has done. Take a few months off and go to lots of museums and field trips. Don't even try to do actual school for awhile. They'll get there, don't worry.
maggiemom2000
by Member on Sep. 8, 2013 at 10:40 AM
1 mom liked this

Workboxes helped for us:

How Workboxes Work in our House

We are a couple of weeks into our second year of homeschool at our house. One thing that we have found works well for us is the Workboxes system. I must admit I never read "the book", Sue Patrick's Workbox System. I read a lot of blogs, looked at a lot of photos and came up with our own version of the system.
For the first time this year the boys are enrolled in the California Virtual Academy (CAVA) which uses the K12 curriculum. I find it is easy to use the Workboxes with this curriculum. (EDIT: We left CAVA/K12 after 6 weeks)
I have one child who is easy to homeschool. He is organized, and will sit quietly and do "seatwork". If I were just working with him I wouldn't need any kind of "system".
My other child is not that way. He has been diagnosed with ADHD and OCD. I know some people don't like labels for their kids. For me, it helps to remind me that I didn't do, or not do anything to cause the way he goes through life. I can't change him, but I can help to try and give him tools to make it easier to get through life. With this child, I needed a "system'!
While I try and make the kids assignments not to "schooly" and avoid worksheets and generally boring busy work, there still needs to be a way to get through the curriculum. The Workboxes help with this. I find that it does several things that are particularly helpful for a child with ADHD:
  • It helps with organization.
  • It is visual and tactile. He can see how much work (how many boxes) need to get done. He physically moves the tag off the box and onto the chart when he is finished with it.
  • It is self rewarding in that he can see the number of tags increase on his chart and feel a sense of accomplishment.
  • It is not so overwhelming to have one task in a box. It doles things out in small enough chunks for him.
  • It takes away me being the one telling him to do each assignment. Instead he just takes a box off the shelf. I find this leads to fewer power struggles.
  • It gives him a sense of control. I allow him to choose which box to do next, he doesn't need to do them in any specific order.
  • It helps me to insert more fun stuff and games. When I put the game in the box the night before I'm not overwhelmed and ready to quit for the day! Before, by the time I got through math, writing, science, etc. I was too tired to say "Let's play Scrabble!" But when it is on one of the boxes it is different.
  • It promotes independence. He chooses a box and starts working on it on his own (unless it is a "MOM" box, then he brings it to me for us to do together).
With my first child, I just had to tell him how the system works, once. With my second child it took a bit more work. The first week with the workboxes there were boxes and tags and supplies EVERYWHERE! It took some time, and lots of one on one to teach him to take down one box, finish it, move the tag, put it away, then take the next box. I think just learning a routine like that is valuable in itself.


This is what it looks like:
I was able to use some shelves that we already had for the workboxes. Each child has 12 boxes, and I usually "fill" 9-12 boxes each day. At first I thought, how will I ever fill 12 boxes, that is WAY too much! When I started doing it I quickly realized that it wasn't too much, because many of the boxes have short activities. Plus, I needed lots of boxes so that I could add lots of "fun" stuff. My kids love the Active Activity Cards. I downloaded those and made more of my own.

I was amazed at first to find that if I put it into a Workbox, they just did it. It was that easy.

When they finish a box, they pull off the tag and and place it on their chart.

I have one child who always carefully places each tag on his chart in numerical order. My other child is a bit less orderly with how he gets his number tags onto his chart. I'll leave you to figure out who does it which way.


This system also keeps ME organized and on track. 
I'm much less likely to get too tired at some point and just put something off until the next day (and the next). I keep things on hand to add to the boxes to keep things interesting and "hand on". In addition to my shelves full of supplies I have this little cart with little games, math manipulatives, hands on science equipment and other supplies. I find that if it is within reach I'm much more likely to take advantage of it.

It is a lot of organization up front, but not too difficult to maintain!

Added January, 2013

More resources:
Workbox Tags
More Workbox Tags
Workboxables

More on using workboxes with a child with ADHD/Aspergers, or similar challenges:
Get Creative!
Fun Workboxes
Workboxes and Power Struggles
Davis05
by on Sep. 8, 2013 at 12:01 PM

They do not like to read  they hate chores and I always end up just doing them myself because I do not want to fight with them

we took the entire summer off and they were very excited but now we are having problems with no end in sight I was thinking about putting my oldest into a online program so she was accountable to someone other then mom

Quoting tuffymama:

Maybe deschool for a while? I would. ODS had to, when I w/d him.
Are they bullheaded about chores, too? Do they otherwise respect and obey you? If it is only the schooling part that causes fights, recalcitrance, and laziness, then you can deschool for a while. During that time, you can identify what kinds of learners they are and tailor the teaching/curriculum to them. If they are just generally loutish layabouts concerning chores and everything else you tell them to do that isn't "fun," then a CTJ and parenting/family overhaul is in order. There is no shame in that, either.


tuffymama
by Bronze Member on Sep. 8, 2013 at 12:07 PM
They've trained you! They whinge and moan, you do their work. They're probably waiting for you to do the schoolwork, too. Frankly, and I am not being catty or snitty at all when I tell you this, they need knots jerked in their tails and you need starch in your mommy spine. TRYING (and failing) to parent and school them in the present state of your family is going to leave you defeated and them ill-prepared for adulthood. We are not raising kids if we do it right; we are raising happy, healthy, PRODUCTIVE adults at the end of this eighteen years. This can be a sentence for you, or a joy and a blessing to all of you. Parenting books and family counselors abound, but help can be found free online. GL!

Quoting Davis05:

They do not like to read  they hate chores and I always end up just doing them myself because I do not want to fight with them

we took the entire summer off and they were very excited but now we are having problems with no end in sight I was thinking about putting my oldest into a online program so she was accountable to someone other then mom

Quoting tuffymama:Maybe deschool for a while? I would. ODS had to, when I w/d him.
Are they bullheaded about chores, too? Do they otherwise respect and obey you? If it is only the schooling part that causes fights, recalcitrance, and laziness, then you can deschool for a while. During that time, you can identify what kinds of learners they are and tailor the teaching/curriculum to them. If they are just generally loutish layabouts concerning chores and everything else you tell them to do that isn't "fun," then a CTJ and parenting/family overhaul is in order. There is no shame in that, either.


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