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Top Ten Professors Calling Out Common Core's So-Called College Readiness

Posted by on Sep. 9, 2013 at 4:16 PM
  • 11 Replies
3 moms liked this
by on Sep. 9, 2013 at 4:16 PM
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kirbymom
by Sonja on Sep. 9, 2013 at 6:31 PM
1 mom liked this
OMG!!!
I was just reading this article last night! AND I was going to post it today! Lol

Great post! :)
SusanTheWriter
by on Sep. 10, 2013 at 9:22 AM

Ugh. Just tragic.

Dawn07
by Bronze Member on Sep. 10, 2013 at 10:28 AM
3 moms liked this
Wow! Having professors of colleges speak out says a lot.
SusanTheWriter
by on Sep. 10, 2013 at 11:08 AM
4 moms liked this

I am more and more convinced that CC has a not-too-subtle subtext stating that the purpose of an education is to churn out workers and, as our Communist friends might point out, wage slaves. This is purely a point of critical thinking, but something to stick in the back of your mind when you consider our physical, as well as philosophical dependence on paychecks. "Wage slave" was always a criticism of hard-line capitalism that reduced human beings to nothing more than work and money.

CC's literature standards, for instance, place little emphasis on literary works that are designed to give students an idea of higher thinking. However, there are few teachers anymore who EVER taught things like Shakespeare or Homer with the kind of open-mindedness that inspired students to aspire to higher thought to begin with. They are out there - DD had a terrific teacher for Honors English - and God bless them, but they are not and never have been the majority.

So with a society that's increasingly more focused on "getting a job," rather than finding a meaningful vocation (that, yes, still pays for an independent living) is it really a question of CC changing the game? Or is CC merely a reflection of where our society at large has brought education?

Just my ramble for the morning. Now off to read about how the gov't influences the economy.

bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Sep. 10, 2013 at 11:41 AM
2 moms liked this

 I absolutely agree.  The literature sections of CC are maddening!  And they have reduced our language arts classes to far too much reading for information/science/and history.  My local school is bragging that their curriculum is now 60% reading for information pieces. 

When I went to college, I went for teaching Physics first.  I took 3 classes on teaching reading in the content area, because that is really where most of it belongs.  An English teacher should not be teaching kids to read technical manuals because they often do not understand it.  Yet that is what CC is suggesting, that reading is really only for the technicals and that literature is just the icing on the cake.  It is not.  It lets us figure out who we are and why we are here.

I'm not saying that the English teacher can't teach technical reading, but they should not be doing the majority of it.  Some of it needs to be put on the science and history teachers.

I know I am a former English teacher, so take this ramble with that in mind.

Quoting SusanTheWriter:

I am more and more convinced that CC has a not-too-subtle subtext stating that the purpose of an education is to churn out workers and, as our Communist friends might point out, wage slaves. This is purely a point of critical thinking, but something to stick in the back of your mind when you consider our physical, as well as philosophical dependence on paychecks. "Wage slave" was always a criticism of hard-line capitalism that reduced human beings to nothing more than work and money.

CC's literature standards, for instance, place little emphasis on literary works that are designed to give students an idea of higher thinking. However, there are few teachers anymore who EVER taught things like Shakespeare or Homer with the kind of open-mindedness that inspired students to aspire to higher thought to begin with. They are out there - DD had a terrific teacher for Honors English - and God bless them, but they are not and never have been the majority.

So with a society that's increasingly more focused on "getting a job," rather than finding a meaningful vocation (that, yes, still pays for an independent living) is it really a question of CC changing the game? Or is CC merely a reflection of where our society at large has brought education?

Just my ramble for the morning. Now off to read about how the gov't influences the economy.

 

SusanTheWriter
by on Sep. 10, 2013 at 11:49 AM

You should hear me screech about the Math standards. No more than a continuation of the already dumbed down Everyday Math curriculum. DS is in Pre-Algebra and I came home from the parent orientation meeting fuming about how stupid it is.

The funny thing is that, personally, I'm less screechy about the English curriculum because I already know I'll be supplementing that at home! What does it say that I already know I'll be "fixing" what he does in school because I can see how lacking the CC standards are?

If we move (an option that only recently popped up in our household), I'm going to push for homeschooling DS, too. At least for the rest of this school year.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 I absolutely agree.  The literature sections of CC are maddening!  And they have reduced our language arts classes to far too much reading for information/science/and history.  My local school is bragging that their curriculum is now 60% reading for information pieces. 

When I went to college, I went for teaching Physics first.  I took 3 classes on teaching reading in the content area, because that is really where most of it belongs.  An English teacher should not be teaching kids to read technical manuals because they often do not understand it.  Yet that is what CC is suggesting, that reading is really only for the technicals and that literature is just the icing on the cake.  It is not.  It lets us figure out who we are and why we are here.

I'm not saying that the English teacher can't teach technical reading, but they should not be doing the majority of it.  Some of it needs to be put on the science and history teachers.

I know I am a former English teacher, so take this ramble with that in mind.

Quoting SusanTheWriter:

I am more and more convinced that CC has a not-too-subtle subtext stating that the purpose of an education is to churn out workers and, as our Communist friends might point out, wage slaves. This is purely a point of critical thinking, but something to stick in the back of your mind when you consider our physical, as well as philosophical dependence on paychecks. "Wage slave" was always a criticism of hard-line capitalism that reduced human beings to nothing more than work and money.

CC's literature standards, for instance, place little emphasis on literary works that are designed to give students an idea of higher thinking. However, there are few teachers anymore who EVER taught things like Shakespeare or Homer with the kind of open-mindedness that inspired students to aspire to higher thought to begin with. They are out there - DD had a terrific teacher for Honors English - and God bless them, but they are not and never have been the majority.

So with a society that's increasingly more focused on "getting a job," rather than finding a meaningful vocation (that, yes, still pays for an independent living) is it really a question of CC changing the game? Or is CC merely a reflection of where our society at large has brought education?

Just my ramble for the morning. Now off to read about how the gov't influences the economy.

 


bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Sep. 10, 2013 at 12:04 PM

 When I sent my first to school I knew I would be fixing English and Math.  It is sad.  What I didn't know was that my son would be far ahead of his peers already because we had already done it.  I didn't know that he would be telling his teacher that we had done the exact same project when he was 3!  Yikes! 

I brought him home and the others have not gone to ps.  With CC, I don't even know how to fight it.  There was not enough discussion about this (true discussion) before the schools just jumped.

Quoting SusanTheWriter:

You should hear me screech about the Math standards. No more than a continuation of the already dumbed down Everyday Math curriculum. DS is in Pre-Algebra and I came home from the parent orientation meeting fuming about how stupid it is.

The funny thing is that, personally, I'm less screechy about the English curriculum because I already know I'll be supplementing that at home! What does it say that I already know I'll be "fixing" what he does in school because I can see how lacking the CC standards are?

If we move (an option that only recently popped up in our household), I'm going to push for homeschooling DS, too. At least for the rest of this school year.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 I absolutely agree.  The literature sections of CC are maddening!  And they have reduced our language arts classes to far too much reading for information/science/and history.  My local school is bragging that their curriculum is now 60% reading for information pieces. 

When I went to college, I went for teaching Physics first.  I took 3 classes on teaching reading in the content area, because that is really where most of it belongs.  An English teacher should not be teaching kids to read technical manuals because they often do not understand it.  Yet that is what CC is suggesting, that reading is really only for the technicals and that literature is just the icing on the cake.  It is not.  It lets us figure out who we are and why we are here.

I'm not saying that the English teacher can't teach technical reading, but they should not be doing the majority of it.  Some of it needs to be put on the science and history teachers.

I know I am a former English teacher, so take this ramble with that in mind.

Quoting SusanTheWriter:

I am more and more convinced that CC has a not-too-subtle subtext stating that the purpose of an education is to churn out workers and, as our Communist friends might point out, wage slaves. This is purely a point of critical thinking, but something to stick in the back of your mind when you consider our physical, as well as philosophical dependence on paychecks. "Wage slave" was always a criticism of hard-line capitalism that reduced human beings to nothing more than work and money.

CC's literature standards, for instance, place little emphasis on literary works that are designed to give students an idea of higher thinking. However, there are few teachers anymore who EVER taught things like Shakespeare or Homer with the kind of open-mindedness that inspired students to aspire to higher thought to begin with. They are out there - DD had a terrific teacher for Honors English - and God bless them, but they are not and never have been the majority.

So with a society that's increasingly more focused on "getting a job," rather than finding a meaningful vocation (that, yes, still pays for an independent living) is it really a question of CC changing the game? Or is CC merely a reflection of where our society at large has brought education?

Just my ramble for the morning. Now off to read about how the gov't influences the economy.

 


 

SusanTheWriter
by on Sep. 10, 2013 at 12:09 PM
1 mom liked this

It also cheeses me off that I honestly believe his Pre-Algebra teacher is a good math teacher. But what can she do when they tell her that this is what she HAS to teach? She's as stuck as the kids are.

TJandKarasMom
by Debbie on Sep. 10, 2013 at 1:27 PM
I didn't read the article yet...but started with the responses... Everyday Math is the worst math program I have ever seen. My DD can hardly do basic math because of it. DS,luckily, was so far ahead in math that he learned how to do math before they ever taught it..which was a huge benefit to him. I did some research of the CC in the early grades and do you know there is NO money standard until 2nd grade?! Not even being able to name coins..nothing. Then in 2nd grade they are expected to now do word problems with money--how can they do that if they don't know what the coins are called or worth? This was the most obvious gap I found..but hey, what's the point in teaching a currency that may not continue to be used, right? And the literature..ugh. I just hate the cc and it is really the biggest reason we decided to homeschool. Taking cursive out, hey then the next generation won't be able to read documents like the Constitution. Teaching kids to use emotions to get their way-when they can't even control their own emotions yet. Oh boy. I'll step down now..
Quoting SusanTheWriter:

You should hear me screech about the Math standards. No more than a continuation of the already dumbed down Everyday Math curriculum. DS is in Pre-Algebra and I came home from the parent orientation meeting fuming about how stupid it is.

The funny thing is that, personally, I'm less screechy about the English curriculum because I already know I'll be supplementing that at home! What does it say that I already know I'll be "fixing" what he does in school because I can see how lacking the CC standards are?

If we move (an option that only recently popped up in our household), I'm going to push for homeschooling DS, too. At least for the rest of this school year.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 I absolutely agree.  The literature sections of CC are maddening!  And they have reduced our language arts classes to far too much reading for information/science/and history.  My local school is bragging that their curriculum is now 60% reading for information pieces. 

When I went to college, I went for teaching Physics first.  I took 3 classes on teaching reading in the content area, because that is really where most of it belongs.  An English teacher should not be teaching kids to read technical manuals because they often do not understand it.  Yet that is what CC is suggesting, that reading is really only for the technicals and that literature is just the icing on the cake.  It is not.  It lets us figure out who we are and why we are here.

I'm not saying that the English teacher can't teach technical reading, but they should not be doing the majority of it.  Some of it needs to be put on the science and history teachers.

I know I am a former English teacher, so take this ramble with that in mind.

Quoting SusanTheWriter:

I am more and more convinced that CC has a not-too-subtle subtext stating that the purpose of an education is to churn out workers and, as our Communist friends might point out, wage slaves. This is purely a point of critical thinking, but something to stick in the back of your mind when you consider our physical, as well as philosophical dependence on paychecks. "Wage slave" was always a criticism of hard-line capitalism that reduced human beings to nothing more than work and money.

CC's literature standards, for instance, place little emphasis on literary works that are designed to give students an idea of higher thinking. However, there are few teachers anymore who EVER taught things like Shakespeare or Homer with the kind of open-mindedness that inspired students to aspire to higher thought to begin with. They are out there - DD had a terrific teacher for Honors English - and God bless them, but they are not and never have been the majority.

So with a society that's increasingly more focused on "getting a job," rather than finding a meaningful vocation (that, yes, still pays for an independent living) is it really a question of CC changing the game? Or is CC merely a reflection of where our society at large has brought education?

Just my ramble for the morning. Now off to read about how the gov't influences the economy.

 



coala
by Silver Member on Sep. 10, 2013 at 1:54 PM
3 moms liked this

I was appalled at what I read.  I have been thinking for a long time now that what they want is a bunch of worker bees that can't think for themselves.  I want to teach my children about critical thinking.  I want them to learn about the classics....this is not just icing for us.  I want them to learn to read technical stuff to, but the classics are SO much more important to me.  I want my kids to have a love of learning and not have something holding them back just becuase it isn't in the curriculum the school is providing.  I want to raise well rounded individuals and you can't have that if they change (for the worse) or eliminate the current curriculum becuase it is so much worse than what I had as a child in the exact same school district. 

I end my ramble....that was not as eloquently written as some of you on your soap boxes....I step down from mine too.

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