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Do you subscribe to the theory that boys and girls learn differently? In general, obviously.

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There are always exceptions to the rule.

Why or why not?

by on Sep. 12, 2013 at 11:03 AM
Replies (11-20):
debramommyof4
by Silver Member on Sep. 12, 2013 at 11:23 PM

 I subscribe to the theory all kids learn differently. Some boys can sit there and pay attention some can not.  I know in my house my oldest (girl) is very focused for the most part.  My 6 year old (girl) needs me to sit with her.  My son (4) needs to move constintly. My 3 year old is the same as my son.  She is a girl. 

Chasing3
by Bronze Member on Sep. 13, 2013 at 7:18 AM

yes, I believe it's generally true. Of course, I believe and see many exceptions.

jen2150
by Silver Member on Sep. 13, 2013 at 7:42 AM

Every child learns differently. There are no two chldren alike. I think that boys and girls have common differences that have to do with their gender.  

candiedgala
by on Sep. 13, 2013 at 7:46 AM

I think being a boy or a girl might make certain learning styles more likely, but I think the individual child's uniqueness is far more important.

Mandallyn
by Member on Sep. 13, 2013 at 7:48 AM

No.  I think each child learns in their own unique way.  I haven't read this book yet, but I plan to. Here's an article on the book and why I think the idea that boys and girls learn differently is a remnant of a mysonginist society that didn't allow women into schoolhouses. 

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/09/10/AR2010091002678.html

mem82
by Platinum Member on Sep. 13, 2013 at 7:57 AM
I believe this, too.

Quoting Chasing3:

yes, I believe it's generally true. Of course, I believe and see many exceptions.

kirbymom
by Sonja on Sep. 13, 2013 at 9:06 PM
In general, yes. Specifically, yes and no. There are so many factors that change the circumstances of these rules. There are also exceptions to most rules. Though not all rules.
lucsch
by on Sep. 16, 2013 at 1:47 PM


My slowest to develop these skills was actually my dd. Poor thing would have been totally lost in a school setting. She would have been taunted by the other kids. I don't know if this is true because our family as a whole defies stereotyping or if it happened because she was an "old egg." I had her the year I turned 40, and my dh was 45.

She has blossomed into an obviously bright young lady. I worked around her speech problems and motor delays. She isn't 100% on track with her speech or motor skills, even now at 10yo, but she is happy and advanced academically.


Quoting bluerooffarm:

 Yes.  And I do not believe it is stereotyping.  It's not about whether or not they like to do workbooks or messy things.  That can be either gender.  But boys are much slower to have fine motor skills, slower to develop the ability to make abstract connections, and typically have more trouble with the skills of putting themselves in another's shoes.  These skills all develop in boys, but it is slower than with the girls. 



bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Sep. 16, 2013 at 2:02 PM

 I have seen specific exceptions to the rule, but for the most part it is a boy/girl thing.

Quoting lucsch:

 

My slowest to develop these skills was actually my dd. Poor thing would have been totally lost in a school setting. She would have been taunted by the other kids. I don't know if this is true because our family as a whole defies stereotyping or if it happened because she was an "old egg." I had her the year I turned 40, and my dh was 45.

She has blossomed into an obviously bright young lady. I worked around her speech problems and motor delays. She isn't 100% on track with her speech or motor skills, even now at 10yo, but she is happy and advanced academically.

 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 Yes.  And I do not believe it is stereotyping.  It's not about whether or not they like to do workbooks or messy things.  That can be either gender.  But boys are much slower to have fine motor skills, slower to develop the ability to make abstract connections, and typically have more trouble with the skills of putting themselves in another's shoes.  These skills all develop in boys, but it is slower than with the girls. 

 

 

 

lucsch
by on Sep. 17, 2013 at 11:53 AM


All three of my sons were excellent students from K4 on, and so were many of their friends. In our personal experience, this stereotype against boys simply is not true. Perhaps it is more true for the kinestic, athletic children or perhaps linked somewhat to intelligence, but I think the difference in boys and girls is overemphasized. Then again, my sons ( as well as my dh) and most of their friends aren't macho males--perhaps they, as a group, defy any stereotypes. One girl told my middle son she wanted to date him for his feminine traits. I also like men who are sensitive and real, not some caricature from a bodice ripping romance. LOL It takes all kinds to make the world go round. We should all be considered individuals IMO. Otherwise, I would have never considered going into a male dominated field and working with them for nearly 20 years. I rarely saw a woman in those days, and I had no daughter at that time, just the 3 sons.


Quoting bluerooffarm:


 I have seen specific exceptions to the rule, but for the most part it is a boy/girl thing.

Quoting lucsch:


My slowest to develop these skills was actually my dd. Poor thing would have been totally lost in a school setting. She would have been taunted by the other kids. I don't know if this is true because our family as a whole defies stereotyping or if it happened because she was an "old egg." I had her the year I turned 40, and my dh was 45.

She has blossomed into an obviously bright young lady. I worked around her speech problems and motor delays. She isn't 100% on track with her speech or motor skills, even now at 10yo, but she is happy and advanced academically.


Quoting bluerooffarm:

 Yes.  And I do not believe it is stereotyping.  It's not about whether or not they like to do workbooks or messy things.  That can be either gender.  But boys are much slower to have fine motor skills, slower to develop the ability to make abstract connections, and typically have more trouble with the skills of putting themselves in another's shoes.  These skills all develop in boys, but it is slower than with the girls. 



 



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