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child prodigy in public school?

Posted by on Sep. 13, 2013 at 4:02 PM
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We were watching the news today about a 13/14 yr old who has a gift in clothing design, pretty much up there with the top designers. Dh said about our little baby that she can be a child prodigy like her. I said "well, she better stay home then" and he said " she can still do that at school, just do AP classes". I told him, no schools will hold them back. How do expect a child to spend time on their talents and interests if they are busy with busy work? Prodigies arent in school! They are either homeschooled or graduate early.
by on Sep. 13, 2013 at 4:02 PM
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Leissaintexas
by Bronze Member on Sep. 13, 2013 at 4:26 PM
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Well, that's kind of a blanket statement, isn't it? I'm sure that if a child prodigy is passionate aboutit, tthey'll find a way to nurture their gift and thrive in public school.
Joann.HS
by on Sep. 13, 2013 at 4:53 PM
While I do agree PS has many flaws, I do not think it's sole purpose is to destroy kiddos. I went to school with some really really crazy gifted kids, who have made a name for themselves.

bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Sep. 13, 2013 at 5:08 PM

 Disagree.  I know many public schooled geniuses.  One of my friends from high school hacked a major database and was recruited by the gov't for it (9th grade).  And I taught a few people who have gone on to do some really great things.

Precious333
by Julia on Sep. 13, 2013 at 6:22 PM
I think that they can do good despite the school.district. i dont think though that schools nurture that, they tend to want to keep everyone at the same level (no one going ahead or behind).
Chasing3
by Bronze Member on Sep. 13, 2013 at 6:41 PM
2 moms liked this

i think it's the rare child who can become a prodigy in spite of all the time spent in school, and even for homeschoolers with much more freedom. And besides, there are many homeschoolers who areinterested in having their children only pursue a very narrow set of studies.

I'd also imagine the child has parents who are immensely encouraging, perhaps even in the fashion area themselves, and go all out to give the child what's needed for her to go full-tilt into a passion. I'd guess all the fashion learning happened outside of public school. Or even largely outside of a very progressive school.

Silverkitty
by Bronze Member on Sep. 13, 2013 at 6:52 PM

Public schools by nature, how they function at their core, are not built for prodigies.  That doesn't mean they will fail them, there are going to be magnum schools and some schools will still have AP classes and such, but many, without family help, will possibly find the system fail them for they go to one that can't afford the advanced or special classes.

kirbymom
by Sonja on Sep. 13, 2013 at 7:01 PM
I'd have to say that this is more true now than 30 years ago. There just aren't not enough teachers out there to help a child buck against the system to be a child prodigy. I'd say even parents are not going to buck too hard against everything it takes to become a child prodigy, persuing the very focused and only interest. Being a child prodigy is extremely time consuming for both child prodigy and parents of child prodigy.
Sad really. We seem to have lost the desire to train, nurture and push for children to be child prodigies if that is what they are.
Precious333
by Julia on Sep. 13, 2013 at 7:04 PM
Agreed.


Quoting kirbymom:

I'd have to say that this is more true now than 30 years ago. There just aren't not enough teachers out there to help a child buck against the system to be a child prodigy. I'd say even parents are not going to buck too hard against everything it takes to become a child prodigy, persuing the very focused and only interest. Being a child prodigy is extremely time consuming for both child prodigy and parents of child prodigy.

Sad really. We seem to have lost the desire to train, nurture and push for children to be child prodigies if that is what they are.

AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Sep. 13, 2013 at 8:39 PM

Even prodigies need the basics and need to do academics; concentrating solely on their interests and gifts will only get them so far in life.

ETA: my husband is a card carrying member of Mensa. Attended a very traditional, strict Catholic school K-12; it certainly did NOT dampen his interests or gifts.

I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















mem82
by Platinum Member on Sep. 13, 2013 at 9:39 PM
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I know our high school offered some sort of independent study for certain kids who had rare talents. They still had to do the basic AP courses or whatever but had time to pursue their other *talent*

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