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Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

Does everyone use a purchased curriculum?

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Or maybe I shoud say a pre-written/pre-designed or predetermined curriculum? It seems to me that every time I look up information on homeschooling it's all about choosing and purchasing a curriculum. Is it necessary? Have any of you just designed your own?

What I've done is familiarize myself with the law, then the core standards at each grade level, and started to gather materials that I feel will keep my daughter on track with (or, realistically, ahead of) the standards. Maybe I just haven't reached the point where I can fit a curriculum into my plan? I don't know, I'm just starting to wonder if I'm going about this the wrong way. Reinventing the wheel.

by on Sep. 14, 2013 at 8:31 PM
Replies (11-20):
armygirl16
by Bronze Member on Sep. 14, 2013 at 10:35 PM
1 mom liked this
Not everyone does, but I do. It works best for us right now. Maybe someday if I can be a SAHM then I can create a curriculum for her. I use memoria press right now and plan to use ambleside or oldgashionededucation.com in the future.
Outrageous
by Member on Sep. 15, 2013 at 7:50 AM
1 mom liked this

I do not.  I have the Calvert curriculum that I purchased several years ago for 2-5th grades when i schooled my older daughters..... I used them before but have since learned to stray away from all of the lessons with my 3rd grader now.... I use a combination of items...... I find that boys learn so differently from girls; what they WANT to learn, to HOW they learn it AND their attention spans!  So ... whatever my son wants to learn about, which I have him tell me in advance, I prepare lesson plans for every subject based upon that.  The lesson plans would include hands on experiments; writing for grammar structure, compositions, graphing/math plans, history, you tube videos, online games, etc. That was the purpost of homeschooling for us..... to get away from the normal "school textbook" style of learning.......   

Chasing3
by Bronze Member on Sep. 15, 2013 at 9:23 AM
1 mom liked this

i bought everything (some used, some acquire free, some new), but I am feeling like a lot of it is junk. But this is my first year doing it and I was paranoid I needed to get so much and make sure the district would approve me. I keep researching many activities and projects that don't use books and worksheets that we plan to do!

I think for stuff like math, spelling, vocab, grammar -- no reason to reinvent the wheel! Buying something is probably easier than trying to do it yourself and may be cheaper than what you'd pay in paper and toner to print out the free stuff on line. I think for science, literacy and social studies, one can do just as well or better with real books borrowed free from the library and project activities researched on-line instead of textbooks and workbooks.

jen2150
by Silver Member on Sep. 15, 2013 at 9:57 AM
I use a little of both. I choose curriculum that fits us. It saves me a lot of time. There are a lot of great curriculum out there. I also write a lot of my own. I just put together a creative math class for my kids and my co-op.
lucsch
by on Sep. 15, 2013 at 10:45 AM

I have done some of both, and I like having a curriculum guide that someone who thinks like me has already planned and written. The books are prescreened and are tied together with a common goal. The questions are written for me to ask ( though they are open ened for the most part), and the teaching of skills and layering of skills from year to year is already planned out for me to implement. I tend to want to cover too much at a time, as well, so it keeps me reined in...somewhat.

tuffymama
by Bronze Member on Sep. 15, 2013 at 1:55 PM
I hear or read, "common core," and I have to fight the urge to walk away. LOL. You're LO seems precocious, so I foresee you abandoning the CCSS shortly, anyway, but if you are committed to using it even as a loose guideline, I would like you to research the CC itself before continuing.

I will always build my own curriculum for LO. That said, I'm really interested in Singapore Math, so I will probably stick with that if it works for him once we start it. I may take parts of other curricula that fit LO and my budget, too. Personally, I find it highly unlikely that any one complete curricum package (including the three Rs, geography, history, etc.) will be the be-all, end-all, perfect fit for many children. If someone knows of that magical, unicorny package, I would really like to see it! It would save me a lot of work and research.
paganbaby
by Silver Member on Sep. 15, 2013 at 2:11 PM

Nope. I don't use one nor do I plan on buying one in the future. For my kids they would be a waste of time. They do much better with my hodge pogde "curriculum"

Knightquester
by Bronze Member on Sep. 15, 2013 at 3:30 PM

Nah' I know a lot of people that use a little of this, and a little of that.  I know one family that is using Easy Peasy for all their subjects.  I have met some that don't really use any, rather they incorporate learning in their day to day life and activities.

Everybody homeschools differently.  My family and I use a little of this and that when it comes to pre-built curriculum, it depends on the subject and child.

Karmea
by Member on Sep. 15, 2013 at 3:54 PM
1 mom liked this

If nothing else, this post has taught me never to mention the CCSS to homeschooling parents! Very prickly issue, I see. I'm only sorry that I haven't been able to make my reasons behind using it clear, because I honestly believe they're valid.

Here's the thing. We have public school teachers in the family. They don't know yet that we plan on homeschooling, but I'm anticipating some.. let's say concern.. over our choice. Now, if I show up armed with a good understanding of the standards kids are held to in public school, and can show that my daughter consistently exceeds them (which she does), I'll be a lot more comfortable having that conversation and hopefully no one will leave feeling her education is going to be neglected.

Never have I claimed or felt that the CCSS is an all-encompassing curriculum for a quality (or adequate) education, any more than Green Eggs and Ham is an adequate education in literature. But should the day come, as I fully expect it will, that I am challenged on my ability to educate my daughter, is it a silly idea to be familiar with the standards she'd be held to if she weren't homeschooled? To be able to demonstrate that she's already doing work the public schools wouldn't have given her for two or three years? I don't know, maybe I'm crazy, but it makes sense to me. The best offense is a good defense and whatnot.


Quoting tuffymama:

I hear or read, "common core," and I have to fight the urge to walk away. LOL. You're LO seems precocious, so I foresee you abandoning the CCSS shortly, anyway, but if you are committed to using it even as a loose guideline, I would like you to research the CC itself before continuing.


mem82
by Platinum Member on Sep. 15, 2013 at 4:35 PM

I make my own. 8)

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