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Proud mommy moment......

Posted by on Sep. 15, 2013 at 7:07 PM
  • 13 Replies
1 mom liked this

Hello ladies!  OK so I'm bragging but only a little because I know all kids learn at different levels and some start reading as early as age 4 depending on their interest.  I had my first phone conference with my sons Kindergarten teacher.  I'm doing public school online for the next couple of years.  So she tested his letter recognition and some basic math skills and he's in the 100%ile for Math and 90%ile for Reading/Language Arts.  For Math he did basic number recognition and placement basic addition and subtraction of a couple of small numbers.  For Language he did letter recognition as many as he can recognize in a mixed sequence as quickly as possible in 1 minute, he also did sight word recognition of like 12 words and got them all right.

So my question is what exactly do most schools require for basic beginning stuff to start kindergarten?  I feel like what in the world are parents doing at home with their kids if their kids can't even get basic letter and word recognition?  Like I said a small brag given I'm in a group that does all this stuff with their kids I'm sure kind of early instead of waiting for them to be 'school' age.  I guess I'm kind of impressed with myself because I didn't think I was doing enough.  I didn't treat what I was doing with him for the past two years or so like it was school.  We just played a lot of games and I 'taught' when he was willing to sit and learn instead of trying to fight with him to learn what I wanted him to.

by on Sep. 15, 2013 at 7:07 PM
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Replies (1-10):
usmom3
by BJ on Sep. 15, 2013 at 8:51 PM
That's great for Him.
AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Sep. 15, 2013 at 9:56 PM
2 moms liked this

That's fantastic.

I do think you're tooting your own horn a bit too much with the "what in the world are they doing at home if they can't teach their children basic letter and word recognition" (not verbatim). It is said that often quick learners level out by grade 3 - karma. Don't assume parents aren't trying, just because their children learn differently.

I say the above as the parent of an accelerated 4 year old. I know many dedicated parents and intelligent children who simply didn't master x,y,z according to a general timetable.

I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















1CynfulDlite
by on Sep. 16, 2013 at 8:29 AM

I can agree with that.  I also understand students who don't speak English as a first language at home and they are learning the basics of life/education in their own language.  I also understand kids with special needs/delays and such.  I'm talking about parents who might not really make the effort because they assume that school/daycare will do it for them.  I'm not saying all parents are this way but there are some out there. 

Quoting AutymsMommy:

That's fantastic.

I do think you're tooting your own horn a bit too much with the "what in the world are they doing at home if they can't teach their children basic letter and word recognition" (not verbatim). It is said that often quick learners level out by grade 3 - karma. Don't assume parents aren't trying, just because their children learn differently.

I say the above as the parent of an accelerated 4 year old. I know many dedicated parents and intelligent children who simply didn't master x,y,z according to a general timetable.

 

AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Sep. 16, 2013 at 9:05 AM
1 mom liked this


I'm not even talking about ESL or language delayed homes/children; I know many a loving, involved parent with neurotypical (or even gifted) children who simply weren't ready to learn letters/numbers at that age.

Quoting 1CynfulDlite:

I can agree with that.  I also understand students who don't speak English as a first language at home and they are learning the basics of life/education in their own language.  I also understand kids with special needs/delays and such.  I'm talking about parents who might not really make the effort because they assume that school/daycare will do it for them.  I'm not saying all parents are this way but there are some out there. 

Quoting AutymsMommy:

That's fantastic.

I do think you're tooting your own horn a bit too much with the "what in the world are they doing at home if they can't teach their children basic letter and word recognition" (not verbatim). It is said that often quick learners level out by grade 3 - karma. Don't assume parents aren't trying, just because their children learn differently.

I say the above as the parent of an accelerated 4 year old. I know many dedicated parents and intelligent children who simply didn't master x,y,z according to a general timetable.

 



I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Sep. 16, 2013 at 9:13 AM
1 mom liked this

 When I signed my child up for Kindergarten, the teacher asked what pre-school he had gone to.  When I said none, she said "oh, great."  (With much stated in her tone, let me tell you.) She had to come back and apologize for that treatment; however, this is what I told her.... I didn't want her apology.  She was wrong to judge me by what he did or didn't know.  Children at age 4 or 5 are not ready to be judged by their knowledge. 

I feel the same way about your post.  Allow them to be kids. For goodness sakes they only get 4 or 5 years in this culture to be kids.  If they are ready and interested, then by all means teach them, but I agree with all those parents who just let their kid be in those first 4 years.  I taught my oldest, he was ready.  I started teaching my middle boy, but he wasn't ready.  He's not delayed, he's not challenged, he just wasn't ready.  So I let him be.  He is now on level.  My 4yo is ready, so I teach him.  Each child is different.

Quoting 1CynfulDlite:

I can agree with that.  I also understand students who don't speak English as a first language at home and they are learning the basics of life/education in their own language.  I also understand kids with special needs/delays and such.  I'm talking about parents who might not really make the effort because they assume that school/daycare will do it for them.  I'm not saying all parents are this way but there are some out there. 

Quoting AutymsMommy:

That's fantastic.

I do think you're tooting your own horn a bit too much with the "what in the world are they doing at home if they can't teach their children basic letter and word recognition" (not verbatim). It is said that often quick learners level out by grade 3 - karma. Don't assume parents aren't trying, just because their children learn differently.

I say the above as the parent of an accelerated 4 year old. I know many dedicated parents and intelligent children who simply didn't master x,y,z according to a general timetable.

 

 

oredeb
by on Sep. 16, 2013 at 10:26 AM

 good job cyn!!!!

1CynfulDlite
by on Sep. 16, 2013 at 12:47 PM

Ha if you think I'm rough on my kid teaching him early you'd HATE my husband's point of view.  I agree with you let them be and enjoy childhood as much as possible.  By no means did I force my child.  I let him learn at his own pace and we worked with what he was interested in.  He liked the sounds and colors of the Leap Frog videos so we worked with that.  As for writing he's still a scribbler but at age three he was interested in trying to write his name.  and he pronounced his name EWIC not Eric so when he wrote it for the very first time on his own he wrote E W I backward C.  I was rather impressed he had that much coordination and letter recognition to be able to attempt writing his first name on his own.

 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 When I signed my child up for Kindergarten, the teacher asked what pre-school he had gone to.  When I said none, she said "oh, great."  (With much stated in her tone, let me tell you.) She had to come back and apologize for that treatment; however, this is what I told her.... I didn't want her apology.  She was wrong to judge me by what he did or didn't know.  Children at age 4 or 5 are not ready to be judged by their knowledge. 

I feel the same way about your post.  Allow them to be kids. For goodness sakes they only get 4 or 5 years in this culture to be kids.  If they are ready and interested, then by all means teach them, but I agree with all those parents who just let their kid be in those first 4 years.  I taught my oldest, he was ready.  I started teaching my middle boy, but he wasn't ready.  He's not delayed, he's not challenged, he just wasn't ready.  So I let him be.  He is now on level.  My 4yo is ready, so I teach him.  Each child is different.

Quoting 1CynfulDlite:

I can agree with that.  I also understand students who don't speak English as a first language at home and they are learning the basics of life/education in their own language.  I also understand kids with special needs/delays and such.  I'm talking about parents who might not really make the effort because they assume that school/daycare will do it for them.  I'm not saying all parents are this way but there are some out there. 

Quoting AutymsMommy:

That's fantastic.

I do think you're tooting your own horn a bit too much with the "what in the world are they doing at home if they can't teach their children basic letter and word recognition" (not verbatim). It is said that often quick learners level out by grade 3 - karma. Don't assume parents aren't trying, just because their children learn differently.

I say the above as the parent of an accelerated 4 year old. I know many dedicated parents and intelligent children who simply didn't master x,y,z according to a general timetable.

 

 

 

bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Sep. 16, 2013 at 1:19 PM
Don't know what the heck happened there. I had a whole thing typed up but it didn't post. I'm not saying you are rough on your kid. I'm saying it is your choice to start early with him. On this board we try to be supportive of all the learning/teaching styles. You are being a bit judgmental by saying: I feel like what in the world are parents doing at home with their kids if their kids can't even get basic letter and word recognition?
Quoting 1CynfulDlite:

Ha if you think I'm rough on my kid teaching him early you'd HATE my husband's point of view.  I agree with you let them be and enjoy childhood as much as possible.  By no means did I force my child.  I let him learn at his own pace and we worked with what he was interested in.  He liked the sounds and colors of the Leap Frog videos so we worked with that.  As for writing he's still a scribbler but at age three he was interested in trying to write his name.  and he pronounced his name EWIC not Eric so when he wrote it for the very first time on his own he wrote E W I backward C.  I was rather impressed he had that much coordination and letter recognition to be able to attempt writing his first name on his own.

 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 When I signed my child up for Kindergarten, the teacher asked what pre-school he had gone to.  When I said none, she said "oh, great."  (With much stated in her tone, let me tell you.) She had to come back and apologize for that treatment; however, this is what I told her.... I didn't want her apology.  She was wrong to judge me by what he did or didn't know.  Children at age 4 or 5 are not ready to be judged by their knowledge. 

I feel the same way about your post.  Allow them to be kids. For goodness sakes they only get 4 or 5 years in this culture to be kids.  If they are ready and interested, then by all means teach them, but I agree with all those parents who just let their kid be in those first 4 years.  I taught my oldest, he was ready.  I started teaching my middle boy, but he wasn't ready.  He's not delayed, he's not challenged, he just wasn't ready.  So I let him be.  He is now on level.  My 4yo is ready, so I teach him.  Each child is different.

Quoting 1CynfulDlite:

I can agree with that.  I also understand students who don't speak English as a first language at home and they are learning the basics of life/education in their own language.  I also understand kids with special needs/delays and such.  I'm talking about parents who might not really make the effort because they assume that school/daycare will do it for them.  I'm not saying all parents are this way but there are some out there. 

Quoting AutymsMommy:

That's fantastic.

I do think you're tooting your own horn a bit too much with the "what in the world are they doing at home if they can't teach their children basic letter and word recognition" (not verbatim). It is said that often quick learners level out by grade 3 - karma. Don't assume parents aren't trying, just because their children learn differently.

I say the above as the parent of an accelerated 4 year old. I know many dedicated parents and intelligent children who simply didn't master x,y,z according to a general timetable.

 

 

 

1CynfulDlite
by on Sep. 16, 2013 at 7:50 PM

OK I didn't mean it to be that way.  Honestly not trying to judge, I'm just curious what the minimums are for entering school kind of like you when you enrolled your child and told the teachers that there had been no previous formal education.  Just wondering what the standards are. 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

Don't know what the heck happened there. I had a whole thing typed up but it didn't post. I'm not saying you are rough on your kid. I'm saying it is your choice to start early with him. On this board we try to be supportive of all the learning/teaching styles. You are being a bit judgmental by saying: I feel like what in the world are parents doing at home with their kids if their kids can't even get basic letter and word recognition?
Quoting 1CynfulDlite:

Ha if you think I'm rough on my kid teaching him early you'd HATE my husband's point of view.  I agree with you let them be and enjoy childhood as much as possible.  By no means did I force my child.  I let him learn at his own pace and we worked with what he was interested in.  He liked the sounds and colors of the Leap Frog videos so we worked with that.  As for writing he's still a scribbler but at age three he was interested in trying to write his name.  and he pronounced his name EWIC not Eric so when he wrote it for the very first time on his own he wrote E W I backward C.  I was rather impressed he had that much coordination and letter recognition to be able to attempt writing his first name on his own.

 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 When I signed my child up for Kindergarten, the teacher asked what pre-school he had gone to.  When I said none, she said "oh, great."  (With much stated in her tone, let me tell you.) She had to come back and apologize for that treatment; however, this is what I told her.... I didn't want her apology.  She was wrong to judge me by what he did or didn't know.  Children at age 4 or 5 are not ready to be judged by their knowledge. 

I feel the same way about your post.  Allow them to be kids. For goodness sakes they only get 4 or 5 years in this culture to be kids.  If they are ready and interested, then by all means teach them, but I agree with all those parents who just let their kid be in those first 4 years.  I taught my oldest, he was ready.  I started teaching my middle boy, but he wasn't ready.  He's not delayed, he's not challenged, he just wasn't ready.  So I let him be.  He is now on level.  My 4yo is ready, so I teach him.  Each child is different.

Quoting 1CynfulDlite:

I can agree with that.  I also understand students who don't speak English as a first language at home and they are learning the basics of life/education in their own language.  I also understand kids with special needs/delays and such.  I'm talking about parents who might not really make the effort because they assume that school/daycare will do it for them.  I'm not saying all parents are this way but there are some out there. 

Quoting AutymsMommy:

That's fantastic.

I do think you're tooting your own horn a bit too much with the "what in the world are they doing at home if they can't teach their children basic letter and word recognition" (not verbatim). It is said that often quick learners level out by grade 3 - karma. Don't assume parents aren't trying, just because their children learn differently.

I say the above as the parent of an accelerated 4 year old. I know many dedicated parents and intelligent children who simply didn't master x,y,z according to a general timetable.

 

 

 

 

bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Sep. 16, 2013 at 8:28 PM

 They wanted him to count to 20, say his abc's, identify at least 10 uppercase and 5 lower case letters, make 4 rhymes, and know above, beside, on, in, under, behind and in front of (they had a bear and a cup and gave those instructions verbally), colors, and shapes.  That's all they asked for.

Quoting 1CynfulDlite:

OK I didn't mean it to be that way.  Honestly not trying to judge, I'm just curious what the minimums are for entering school kind of like you when you enrolled your child and told the teachers that there had been no previous formal education.  Just wondering what the standards are. 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

Don't know what the heck happened there. I had a whole thing typed up but it didn't post. I'm not saying you are rough on your kid. I'm saying it is your choice to start early with him. On this board we try to be supportive of all the learning/teaching styles. You are being a bit judgmental by saying: I feel like what in the world are parents doing at home with their kids if their kids can't even get basic letter and word recognition?
Quoting 1CynfulDlite:

Ha if you think I'm rough on my kid teaching him early you'd HATE my husband's point of view.  I agree with you let them be and enjoy childhood as much as possible.  By no means did I force my child.  I let him learn at his own pace and we worked with what he was interested in.  He liked the sounds and colors of the Leap Frog videos so we worked with that.  As for writing he's still a scribbler but at age three he was interested in trying to write his name.  and he pronounced his name EWIC not Eric so when he wrote it for the very first time on his own he wrote E W I backward C.  I was rather impressed he had that much coordination and letter recognition to be able to attempt writing his first name on his own.

 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 When I signed my child up for Kindergarten, the teacher asked what pre-school he had gone to.  When I said none, she said "oh, great."  (With much stated in her tone, let me tell you.) She had to come back and apologize for that treatment; however, this is what I told her.... I didn't want her apology.  She was wrong to judge me by what he did or didn't know.  Children at age 4 or 5 are not ready to be judged by their knowledge. 

I feel the same way about your post.  Allow them to be kids. For goodness sakes they only get 4 or 5 years in this culture to be kids.  If they are ready and interested, then by all means teach them, but I agree with all those parents who just let their kid be in those first 4 years.  I taught my oldest, he was ready.  I started teaching my middle boy, but he wasn't ready.  He's not delayed, he's not challenged, he just wasn't ready.  So I let him be.  He is now on level.  My 4yo is ready, so I teach him.  Each child is different.

Quoting 1CynfulDlite:

I can agree with that.  I also understand students who don't speak English as a first language at home and they are learning the basics of life/education in their own language.  I also understand kids with special needs/delays and such.  I'm talking about parents who might not really make the effort because they assume that school/daycare will do it for them.  I'm not saying all parents are this way but there are some out there. 

Quoting AutymsMommy:

That's fantastic.

I do think you're tooting your own horn a bit too much with the "what in the world are they doing at home if they can't teach their children basic letter and word recognition" (not verbatim). It is said that often quick learners level out by grade 3 - karma. Don't assume parents aren't trying, just because their children learn differently.

I say the above as the parent of an accelerated 4 year old. I know many dedicated parents and intelligent children who simply didn't master x,y,z according to a general timetable.

 

 

 

 

 

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