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Want to pull my son....feeling very overwhelmed about curriculum

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He is 7 1/2 in second grade. He has adhd and cmt1a. While I thought the school was being accommodating and helpful at first I am starting to get attitude and not understanding. I've always wanted to homeschool but got so much pushback from family I went against my better judgement and sent him. 

For those of you who don't know CMT is a progressive neurological disorder that makes it difficult for him to do certain things physically. He is in therapy 3x a week. Writing tasks are difficult as he doesn't have normal muscle strength in his hands. He needs a grotto grip to help and extra time. The kids in class keep taking his grip so he's been told that he needs to take it home with him every night and he can bring it back in the morning. He also is not supposed to push it physically. In PE he can only run so many laps and the teacher has been informed if that. Since then they have chosen to not run laps at all. This has been good. Thank you. Now they do other activities. The problem we have been having since is that if my son has to stop....if it's gotten to be too much...the teacher makes the whole class start over again.

So nothing too major happening. Just some frustration. I've asked for a 504 and an IEP but was told he didn't qualify for the IEP. I got his midterm report yesterday and my once above grade level reader is below grade level. He was also below in math as well. Idk what going on but I'm not too happy right now. 

I am trying to do my research and put some things together because I know the time is coming. I just am not good with lesson planning and all of that. Are there any curriculum or sets that already have lesson plans made? I just wouldn't know where to start. Can anyone suggest anything? I've read about abeka, Saxon or sunlight for math and apologia for science? 

Thanks in advance

by on Sep. 27, 2013 at 9:13 AM
Replies (11-20):
Mommynay2
by Member on Sep. 27, 2013 at 1:23 PM

I would suggest time4learning, the whole curriculum is laid out for you based on his ability level. They have subjects all set per grade level, but you can choose a different grade level per subject. If hypothetically speaking you pick second grade language arts, then on the screen you will get both first grade and third grade based on his level of understanding. There's no commitment, if you decide in the month it's not for him, you can cancel it and that's it you won't be charged for the following month. There are some supplies you may have to get, and there's extra reading but you can get the books from the library. It costs $19.99 per month. And for the lower elementary students, from Pre-K to grade 3 it's really fun and has a lot of animation to it. You can set the time that he has to work, and after that is done he can play at the playground online, which has different games for the amount of time you set. They do all the grading on there, as well as keep track of his time on there. I hope this helps, good luck.

Codysmom2106
by Member on Sep. 27, 2013 at 1:30 PM


We have used that in the past. Some things were okay and something's just weren't enough. Although it might be something I could build off of. Thank you for the suggestion. :)

Quoting Mommynay2:

I would suggest time4learning, the whole curriculum is laid out for you based on his ability level. They have subjects all set per grade level, but you can choose a different grade level per subject. If hypothetically speaking you pick second grade language arts, then on the screen you will get both first grade and third grade based on his level of understanding. There's no commitment, if you decide in the month it's not for him, you can cancel it and that's it you won't be charged for the following month. There are some supplies you may have to get, and there's extra reading but you can get the books from the library. It costs $19.99 per month. And for the lower elementary students, from Pre-K to grade 3 it's really fun and has a lot of animation to it. You can set the time that he has to work, and after that is done he can play at the playground online, which has different games for the amount of time you set. They do all the grading on there, as well as keep track of his time on there. I hope this helps, good luck.



Codysmom2106
by Member on Sep. 27, 2013 at 1:35 PM


Nothing is ever set in stone as far as I'm concerned. I don't mind mixing and taking pieces from more than one thing once I become comfortable. It's starting out that can be overwhelming. I've been reading and researching for a very long time but just have never had the nerve to keep him home. With everything going on with him I have found a lot more strength within myself to advocate for him and make decisions whether people like them or not. I've had the feeling more and more lately that I could do more for my son at home than the school can. He just gets defiant sometimes and refuses to work. That's a fear that both my dh and I both share. I hope that in time though we will both get comfortable and find a rhythm that works. Thank you for sharing your experience. It really helps and I truly appreciate it. Best of luckk! It's great that your son is doing so well.

Quoting Chasing3:


a boxed curriculum might be a great way to start to get yourseflf up and running with everyting you'll need and without knocking yourself out researching individual pieces. You could buy something and probably have it delivered to your door overnight if you pay the shipping and you want to start immediately.

It's just the first year, so if you don't like something, alter it to make it work for now and research what you'd rather do differently next year. You will learn as much homeschooling as your son will. If you are between traditional and unschool, you'll probably be great at following your nose and seeing what works and what doesn't when starting with the traditional materials. If you go in with the attitude that you are not afraid to deviate from the "box" will probably work out fine especially since he's young. It's not like you are starting with a high schooler who's always been in public school and you're going to have to sit down and try to teach him physics next week!

I am always reading the homeschool forums and curricula review sites. If I see someone mention something, i look it up. If it seems interesting I bookmark it or print it out or write it down. If you keep that up, you'll surely end up with a list of stuff you think looks interesting that is far longer than what you can possibly cover in a year! 

I"m in a state with a lot of requirements so I bought a lot of used textbooks to submit as my materials, mostly because I was afraid I'd get denied if they didn't like what I listed. I'm realizing the hands-on activities I find on line and real books from the library are far more engaging and worthwhile for us than the pages of make-work that came in the workbooks I got. The nice thing about researching as I've done, is I alreayd pretty much decided what I'll use next year (yup, prety sure I want to continue!!) and it's not even October!

My son is not diagnosed with anything, although the school would surely have me believe he is adhd. I have researched it - and a lot of other learning disabilities and "disorders" - to death. I've formulated pretty strong opinions on this whole disordered kid trend, and figured out what I am confident will work for me and my son. I am also confident the school would never, ever, ever have put in the research I've done and ever been the least bit effective in implementing a learning environment that works for my son. I've started my own occupational therapy plan (we do like an OT session daily at home with some weights, body weight exercises, exercise bands, games, etc) based on research I've read on exercise and adhd-like behaviors. We do fine motor skills practice and I'm intent on teaching him beautiful cursive because I've read interesting studies on the proper development of gross motor skills, leading to proper fine motor skills, both of which lead to increased stamina for attentive tasks like sitting and reading and writing. I've only been at this for one month and I love it and think my son is thriving.

long story short - you will do a thousand times more for your son at home than the school will ever do.



Chasing3
by Bronze Member on Sep. 27, 2013 at 2:44 PM

I was very much afraid my son would get defiant, luckily I've had very little problem. A couple times I've raised my voice or bluntly pointed out that he is supposed to be at the 4th grade level and he's working like a 6 year old, but I've never encountered the complete resistance the school said he put up daily. 

But, I also was like 99% confident I could do this and we'd work pretty well together. Luckily it's working so far.

I also read a few books on unschooling and a book on democratic school called "Free to Learn" by Peter Gray. While I'm not an unschooler, the philosophy of learning was liberating to me and made me realize if it ever came to me having to shout or cajole or bribe or scold, then I had to re-evaluate if the task was a worthwhile learning experience or if there could be choice involved and it could be done another way or do something completely different. I tried to involve my son in all the decision making with how to plan the day and what all the materials I bought were going to be and how we envisioned doing the work each day. I think that helps with my son not being defiant - knowing he has choice.

Another book I read and loved is "Feel Bad Education" by Alfie Kohn - made me super confident I was doing the right thing.

unsuspected
by Member on Sep. 27, 2013 at 2:48 PM
Hey. First off, welcome to the adventures of homeschooling. :-) I am new to this as well.

We are using Math U See ... it heavily relies on manipulatives and my kIds (10, 5, 5 & 3) are loving it. The twins say "Thank you for buying this math for us." And my oldest will ask to do math even on days we don't have it scheduled. :-) I really recommend it.

We are using Apologia Science and Mystery of History and Veritas Phonics for the twins. We are on a budget so we went with an a la carte selection rather than an all in one.
Christie1952
by Member on Sep. 28, 2013 at 12:46 PM

What they are doing is abusive!  You might take a look at Khana Academy, it has info on a lot of subjects and all grade levels, best because it is free.  Loved Saxon math. It is not okay that they are treating him this way and by making the other kids start over when he has reached his llimit they are going to make him a subject of ridicule and hatred. Please do not put him back into that environment! You can homeschool. Just guide him forward at his own pace and get a lawyer.

Codysmom2106
by Member on Sep. 28, 2013 at 12:52 PM


I will definitely check into that. Thank you! I'm going to see if I can speak with the PE teacher on Monday. We are supposed to have his meeting first thing. I'd like to hear from him if this is some sort of "game" the class is playing and if the starting over applies to anyone who stops. Regardless the activities they do may be a bit much for him physically so I'd like to find out more. In the mean time I will check out the Khana academy. I'm also looking at abeka and using the independent study option from k12. 

Quoting Christie1952:

What they are doing is abusive!  You might take a look at Khana Academy, it has info on a lot of subjects and all grade levels, best because it is free.  Loved Saxon math. It is not okay that they are treating him this way and by making the other kids start over when he has reached his llimit they are going to make him a subject of ridicule and hatred. Please do not put him back into that environment! You can homeschool. Just guide him forward at his own pace and get a lawyer.



lucsch
by Bronze Member on Sep. 28, 2013 at 1:18 PM

Take a look at Heart of Dakota

calimom1123
by Member on Sep. 28, 2013 at 1:53 PM
My favorite math is teaching textbooks. Its done on computer but great! Its a bit behind so a 2nd grader could easily do their 3rd grade. We use it above grade level and my dd has done great with it. Bob jones is great for english/math. Abeka is good too but moves fast.
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TidewaterClan
by Kate on Sep. 28, 2013 at 9:46 PM
1 mom liked this
I just pulled my 6th grader out 3 weeks ago. We're using Math In Focus, Reading Street, and Prentice Hall Writing & Grammar. I bought all of them used, in great condition, from Amazon. I purchased the teacher's editions for Math & Writing and they lay out everything from schedule to script.

You can check out the LA books from Pearson for their ISBNs: pearsonhomeschool.com

Here is where I purchased our Social Studies (Harcourt Horizons) - I bought the package from this site with her 20% off code & free shipping. She also has the Math In Focus & Saxon Math; I know lots of people love Saxon, and you can pre-test placement level too. We LOVE the Social Studies and it's about our favorite subject. The teacher cd (cheaper than the book version) & student workbook make a huge difference. Here's the site: Mysaxonhomeschool.com. I had to dig a little to find the ISBNs for our math to check against Amazon's prices.

I can't turn those into links from my phone. :(

We're using Science Fusion from the Saxon site but it's tricky working with the online side of things. I'd be confident going with any of Pearson's products, and they're cheaper too.

My 3rd grader uses the same curriculum (level 3 instead of 6 of course!) and we 're really happy with all of it so far.

These are all secular materials, just an FYI, depending on what you're looking for.

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