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Just looking to see what other people's opinions are....

What is an expert and what do they do?

What makes them an expert?

  

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by on Oct. 3, 2013 at 8:43 PM
Replies (11-20):
Leissaintexas
by Bronze Member on Oct. 4, 2013 at 10:55 AM
1 mom liked this
My grandmother raised 4 boys in an era where there were no "experts" on raising children. She did it in near-poverty with a husband that was seldom home. She picked cotton with a baby strapped to her back, taught every one of those boys with little education of her own, and tragically lost one son when he was 19. When I need advice on anything, she's the one I go to. She's got a wealth of knowledge that you just can't get out of books.
hwblyf
by Silver Member on Oct. 4, 2013 at 11:13 AM

That's interesting.  I've gone to many "experts" in the field of allergies, and I wouldn't really want to go back (even though I did for years cuz my younger self didn't have the same sense I have now).  Passion wasn't their thing.  Nor was understanding.  Book knowledge isn't everything.  You can know something, and not KNOW it.  That said, I wouldn't go to a non-schooled doctor, but that degree is only a starting place.  And the ONLY reason it's a starting place, is because someone else has affirmed that person has the knowledge, not because the degree gave them more knowledge, does that make sense?  I want to know they've gone through and gotten the knowledge they claim to have without having to spend all the time necessary to affirm it myself.  I also think that experience gives much more credence to their knowledge, and in the case of your son's surgeries, no one could get the experience without the education.


Quoting AutymsMommy:

It's nice in theory to feel that one needn't have an education in order to be an expert in something, and I will agree to a point, but I'll also disagree - when it comes to something very important (say, life or death), I wouldn't trust someone without formal education in that area; someone who has been taught and tested on that knowledge. For example, when my son had his surgeries, I conferred with experts in lung, cardio, and vascular; sorry, but I wasn't going to trust someone "self educated", even if only for advice on the subject.

Other things - less life altering - sure, why not. Someone who is passionate about, and educates themselves on, the subject or field of their choice. Not sure I would consider them an expert or just very passionate though, if I'm honest.




mem82
by Platinum Member on Oct. 4, 2013 at 11:58 AM
2 moms liked this

I'm an expert in sarcasm.

hwblyf
by Silver Member on Oct. 4, 2013 at 1:21 PM


self-taught?  :)

Quoting mem82:

I'm an expert in sarcasm.



kirbymom
by Sonja on Oct. 4, 2013 at 1:21 PM
I love this thought but am going to have to think and bring together sone well formulated thoughts.



Quoting AutymsMommy:

It's nice in theory to feel that one needn't have an education in order to be an expert in something, and I will agree to a point, but I'll also disagree - when it comes to something very important (say, life or death), I wouldn't trust someone without formal education in that area; someone who has been taught and tested on that knowledge. For example, when my son had his surgeries, I conferred with experts in lung, cardio, and vascular; sorry, but I wasn't going to trust someone "self educated", even if only for advice on the subject.

Other things - less life altering - sure, why not. Someone who is passionate about, and educates themselves on, the subject or field of their choice. Not sure I would consider them an expert or just very passionate though, if I'm honest.


mem82
by Platinum Member on Oct. 4, 2013 at 1:27 PM
1 mom liked this

Yes. I spent years practicing and honing my craft. I refer to that era of my life Public School.

Quoting hwblyf:


self-taught?  :)

Quoting mem82:

I'm an expert in sarcasm.




AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Oct. 4, 2013 at 1:33 PM


To be frank, when it comes to life or death, I don't care if they aren't passionate or understanding. Some of my boy's surgeons lacked bedside manner and compassion entirely (or so it seemed), but that didn't stop them from successfully performing a surgery they had never done, and saving his life. Sometimes you can be incredibly good at something, even if you lack passion. I wouldn't have traded them for a doctor with passion, but with less knowledge or skill.

There are some areas of knowledge that cannot be affirmed without formal education and testing, and I trust that. Things that would be detrimental to others, if done wrong, shouldn't be self-affirmed; that has the potential to be dangerous. If you were on trial for capital murder, would you trust a self educated "lawyer", with no credentialed affirmation of skills, with your life and liberty?

Quoting hwblyf:

That's interesting.  I've gone to many "experts" in the field of allergies, and I wouldn't really want to go back (even though I did for years cuz my younger self didn't have the same sense I have now).  Passion wasn't their thing.  Nor was understanding.  Book knowledge isn't everything.  You can know something, and not KNOW it.  That said, I wouldn't go to a non-schooled doctor, but that degree is only a starting place.  And the ONLY reason it's a starting place, is because someone else has affirmed that person has the knowledge, not because the degree gave them more knowledge, does that make sense?  I want to know they've gone through and gotten the knowledge they claim to have without having to spend all the time necessary to affirm it myself.  I also think that experience gives much more credence to their knowledge, and in the case of your son's surgeries, no one could get the experience without the education.


Quoting AutymsMommy:

It's nice in theory to feel that one needn't have an education in order to be an expert in something, and I will agree to a point, but I'll also disagree - when it comes to something very important (say, life or death), I wouldn't trust someone without formal education in that area; someone who has been taught and tested on that knowledge. For example, when my son had his surgeries, I conferred with experts in lung, cardio, and vascular; sorry, but I wasn't going to trust someone "self educated", even if only for advice on the subject.

Other things - less life altering - sure, why not. Someone who is passionate about, and educates themselves on, the subject or field of their choice. Not sure I would consider them an expert or just very passionate though, if I'm honest.






I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















kirbymom
by Sonja on Oct. 4, 2013 at 1:36 PM
That is going in the same thought direction I am on. Let me ask a question here...do any of them 'need' a degree to be "true"?


Quoting hwblyf:

I found the best poster that I then made and hung at home.  It defines novice, apprentice, practitioner, and expert.  It's to get my kids thinking about where they are with certain skills, certain pieces of knowledge.  I love the definitions.  For this poster, an expert is someone who knows the topic well enough to teach it to someone else.

http://eberopolis.blogspot.com/2012/04/management-mentoring-monday-assessing.html

Possibly this isn't what you were going for since you and blue took it in a different direction, but I thought I'd add this.


kirbymom
by Sonja on Oct. 4, 2013 at 1:48 PM
I understand exactly how you feel. It is a scary place to be in when your child's life in on the line. However, when those same "degree'd" doctors tell you that your child is not sick enough from the drugs of cancer programs and we need to make your child more sick. Do you still trust those "experts"?

Quoting AutymsMommy:

To be frank,to life or death, I don't care if they aren't passionate or understanding. Some of my boy's surgeons lacked bedside manner and compassion entirely (or so it seemed), but that didn't stop them from successfully performing a surgery they had never done, and saving his life. Sometimes you can be incredibly good at something, even if you lack passion. I wouldn't have traded them for a doctor with passion, but with less knowledge or skill.

There are some areas of knowledge that cannot be affirmed without formal education and testing, and I trust that. Things that would be detrimental to others, if done wrong, shouldn't be self-affirmed; that has the potential to be dangerous. If you were on trial for capital murder, would you trust a self educated "lawyer", with no credentialed affirmation of skills, with your life and liberty?


Quoting hwblyf:

That's interesting.  I've gone to many "experts" in the field of allergies, and I wouldn't really want to go back (even though I did for years cuz my younger self didn't have the same sense I have now).  Passion wasn't their thing.  Nor was understanding.  Book knowledge isn't everything.  You can know something, and not KNOW it.  That said, I wouldn't go to a non-schooled doctor, but that degree is only a starting place.  And the ONLY reason it's a starting place, is because someone else has affirmed that person has the knowledge, not because the degree gave them more knowledge, does that make sense?  I want to know they've gone through and gotten the knowledge they claim to have without having to spend all the time necessary to affirm it myself.  I also think that experience gives much more credence to their knowledge, and in the case of your son's surgeries, no one could get the experience without the education.


Quoting AutymsMommy:

It's nice in theory to feel that one needn't have an education in order to be an expert in something, and I will agree to a point, but I'll also disagree - when it comes to something very important (say, life or death), I wouldn't trust someone without formal education in that area; someone who has been taught and tested on that knowledge. For example, when my son had his surgeries, I conferred with experts in lung, cardio, and vascular; sorry, but I wasn't going to trust someone "self educated", even if only for advice on the subject.

Other things - less life altering - sure, why not. Someone who is passionate about, and educates themselves on, the subject or field of their choice. Not sure I would consider them an expert or just very passionate though, if I'm honest.






hwblyf
by Silver Member on Oct. 4, 2013 at 1:59 PM

I don't put as much faith in the credentialling as you do.  I agree, going through hoops to prove your academic knowledge is beneficial, but it's not the only way.  Would I trust a non-credentialed attorney?  I would say entirely that it depends.  Clearly I don't have a ton of time to assess their knowledge, so if it's someone I don't know, no.  And only because that degree shows me, to some degree, that they know something.

Doctors.  Yeah.  In a heartbeat I would trade passion and compassion and understanding for certification.  In a freaking heartbeat.  But I've not been in the life and death situation you've been in.  I've been in the situations where book knowledge does NOT trump my own personal experience, and instead of dealing with ME and what's going on with ME, the doctor will treat what he or she knows to be true.  Except that there are exceptions to every rule.  I am that exception.  And it's tiresome to hear.  I did not get a spinal injection this summer in part because the doctor was a donkey.  Also in part because I read that the injections are painful and not altogether effective.  But I won't see a donkey.  But that has nothing to do with credentials, and so I"m sorry I've hopped on this bandwagon.

My point is that degree does not equal expert, lack of degree does not indicate inferior knowledge or ability.  Would you only take your child seat to the fire department to be put in the car, or would you trust that you can do that?  How about cooking?  And those are not great examples compared to yours, but I feel that a degree is just an exterior acknowledgement of something interior.  And it may or may not be accurate.  But you're looking for and needing/wanting that affirmation.  I get that.  The degree is the shortcut to personal knowledge of what the person in front of you knows.


Quoting AutymsMommy:


To be frank, when it comes to life or death, I don't care if they aren't passionate or understanding. Some of my boy's surgeons lacked bedside manner and compassion entirely (or so it seemed), but that didn't stop them from successfully performing a surgery they had never done, and saving his life. Sometimes you can be incredibly good at something, even if you lack passion. I wouldn't have traded them for a doctor with passion, but with less knowledge or skill.

There are some areas of knowledge that cannot be affirmed without formal education and testing, and I trust that. Things that would be detrimental to others, if done wrong, shouldn't be self-affirmed; that has the potential to be dangerous. If you were on trial for capital murder, would you trust a self educated "lawyer", with no credentialed affirmation of skills, with your life and liberty?

Quoting hwblyf:

That's interesting.  I've gone to many "experts" in the field of allergies, and I wouldn't really want to go back (even though I did for years cuz my younger self didn't have the same sense I have now).  Passion wasn't their thing.  Nor was understanding.  Book knowledge isn't everything.  You can know something, and not KNOW it.  That said, I wouldn't go to a non-schooled doctor, but that degree is only a starting place.  And the ONLY reason it's a starting place, is because someone else has affirmed that person has the knowledge, not because the degree gave them more knowledge, does that make sense?  I want to know they've gone through and gotten the knowledge they claim to have without having to spend all the time necessary to affirm it myself.  I also think that experience gives much more credence to their knowledge, and in the case of your son's surgeries, no one could get the experience without the education.


Quoting AutymsMommy:

It's nice in theory to feel that one needn't have an education in order to be an expert in something, and I will agree to a point, but I'll also disagree - when it comes to something very important (say, life or death), I wouldn't trust someone without formal education in that area; someone who has been taught and tested on that knowledge. For example, when my son had his surgeries, I conferred with experts in lung, cardio, and vascular; sorry, but I wasn't going to trust someone "self educated", even if only for advice on the subject.

Other things - less life altering - sure, why not. Someone who is passionate about, and educates themselves on, the subject or field of their choice. Not sure I would consider them an expert or just very passionate though, if I'm honest.








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