Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms
So I have a 2nd grader. We use Christian Liberty. Today I was comparing work with a 2nd grader from our church who attends the local elementary. The school gives the 2nd graders timed tests every Friday in math. They have 10 minutes to do 100 addition problems, then 10 minutes to do 100 subtraction problems. The sum or difference of each problem is 10 or less. They haven't learned to carry or borrow yet. My 2nd grader has learned to carry and borrow up to 4 places, but hasn't had timed math tests. What does your 2nd grade math look like? And do I need to do timed tests?
by on Oct. 5, 2013 at 11:05 PM
Replies (11-19):
coala
by Silver Member on Oct. 7, 2013 at 11:47 AM

My 1st grader had 10 problems and they did a math "drill" everyday.  They had 2 minutes.  This is something they do regularly to help increase the speed of the spitting out the math facts.  With every test they have to answer 5 questions....with only 30 seconds for each question.  I don't think you necessarily HAVE to do this, but it has been very helpful for us.

kmath
by Silver Member on Oct. 7, 2013 at 11:53 AM
1 mom liked this

I disagree, I don't think timed tests are important either.  Being able to do that in your head quickly is one thing and timed tests do work on that but so do other things.  I don't see the need for him to be able to write it out that quickly though.  All of those scenarios are about doing mental math and you don't need timed tests to improve in that area.


Quoting JKronrod:

I agree that if it's causing anxiety one shouldn't 'force,' but the goal should be to get the kids to the point that they AREN'T stressed by this type of work, and the only way to do that is, eventually, to practice in a timed environment.  It's like sports or anything else: speed and confidence are important and those only come with repetitiion and practice AND competition (in this case against the clock).  Sure there might be some stress, but is it CONSTRUCTIVE so that they improve and feel confident or is it DESTRUCTIVE causing anxiety? Simply saying no timed tests, ever (although I don't know that's what you are saying) is going to do them no favors when they need to be able to figure out whether a particular business deal is good or bad in their head, quickly, or be able to do a ball-park estimate, fast, for a client about the costs of a remodel. There is always going to be stress in the real world.  Timed tests help to prepare them for that.   


Quoting bluerooffarm:

 Nope, no timed tests whatsoever here.  I do have the kids play math games on the computer which is a timed thing, but I do not think timed tests really do anything but cause anxiety.  There are other ways to learn automaticity which is what the PS is trying for there.  They have a large # of students per teacher and really do not have the time necessary to do the other ways of getting the kids fast at their facts.  If your child can do the timed tests and not get anxious about it, or they even like doing it, then sure, but don't just do it because the PS is doing it.





oredeb
by on Oct. 7, 2013 at 12:13 PM

 my kids survived without timed tests on paper!!hahahah we used rod and staff mostly for that age and if i remember right they did have timed drills but we never did them as a sit down do on the paper thing. i wrote a couple on a chalk board and had the kids race to the board and do them, much funner! or with only one child u can use a timer!  i even raced with them!haha

 

JKronrod
by Bronze Member on Oct. 7, 2013 at 12:30 PM

I understand the position,  but I think that being able to handle stress and perform under stressful conditions is part of what a child needs to learn.  Not "freezing up" is important.  Part of this may  be my personal experience -- my profession requires that I both be able to speak and write persuasively and clearly under stressful conditions, and while I don't have to do computations quickly, I once did apply for a position  where that WAS part of the job. This was straight out of college - and although not completely pre-calculator -- I'm in my fifties -- this was not a position where their use would have been acceptable at that time.  I got the offer (although I didn't accept it for other reasons) in part because I was able to keep my cool and do the math -- literally.  I want to be clear that I'm NOT suggesting that you do these types of tests if the child is getting anxiety or otherwise being damaged, you have to build up to it, but I think avoiding them altogether for most children is not a good idea either. 


Quoting bluerooffarm:

 I disagree.  I don't think timed tests are ever necessary and I do not believe that timed tests are helpful in the later in life.  My kids can do mental math very quickly when it is needed, but they have never done timed tests.  They cook and they can quickly double, triple or quadruple a recipe in their heads.  We just use real world applications and games to get them fast and accurate.

Quoting JKronrod:

I agree that if it's causing anxiety one shouldn't 'force,' but the goal should be to get the kids to the point that they AREN'T stressed by this type of work, and the only way to do that is, eventually, to practice in a timed environment.  It's like sports or anything else: speed and confidence are important and those only come with repetitiion and practice AND competition (in this case against the clock).  Sure there might be some stress, but is it CONSTRUCTIVE so that they improve and feel confident or is it DESTRUCTIVE causing anxiety? Simply saying no timed tests, ever (although I don't know that's what you are saying) is going to do them no favors when they need to be able to figure out whether a particular business deal is good or bad in their head, quickly, or be able to do a ball-park estimate, fast, for a client about the costs of a remodel. There is always going to be stress in the real world.  Timed tests help to prepare them for that.   

 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 Nope, no timed tests whatsoever here.  I do have the kids play math games on the computer which is a timed thing, but I do not think timed tests really do anything but cause anxiety.  There are other ways to learn automaticity which is what the PS is trying for there.  They have a large # of students per teacher and really do not have the time necessary to do the other ways of getting the kids fast at their facts.  If your child can do the timed tests and not get anxious about it, or they even like doing it, then sure, but don't just do it because the PS is doing it.

 

 

 


 

bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Oct. 7, 2013 at 2:23 PM
1 mom liked this
I don't think there is any single kind of test or kind of learning activity that I would say is important for "most children." That is public school thinking IMO. All children are different. I can teach performing quickly and dealing with stress without timed tests and it is a bit silly to think it isn't good for most children. There is no need for timed tests. We have more time one-on-one with our kids in order to bring them up to the automaticity required for life. We do not need to give them timed tests. I am quite capable of speaking and writing persuasively without doing timed tests. This mother ask for opinions. My opinion is that they are not necessary. There is no "winning" this argument, because you are not going to change my mind and this woman needs to know that there are those of us that do not put our kids through timed tests and our kids turn out just fine.
Quoting JKronrod:

I understand the position,  but I think that being able to handle stress and perform under stressful conditions is part of what a child needs to learn.  Not "freezing up" is important.  Part of this may  be my personal experience -- my profession requires that I both be able to speak and write persuasively and clearly under stressful conditions, and while I don't have to do computations quickly, I once did apply for a position  where that WAS part of the job. This was straight out of college - and although not completely pre-calculator -- I'm in my fifties -- this was not a position where their use would have been acceptable at that time.  I got the offer (although I didn't accept it for other reasons) in part because I was able to keep my cool and do the math -- literally.  I want to be clear that I'm NOT suggesting that you do these types of tests if the child is getting anxiety or otherwise being damaged, you have to build up to it, but I think avoiding them altogether for most children is not a good idea either. 


Quoting bluerooffarm:

 I disagree.  I don't think timed tests are ever necessary and I do not believe that timed tests are helpful in the later in life.  My kids can do mental math very quickly when it is needed, but they have never done timed tests.  They cook and they can quickly double, triple or quadruple a recipe in their heads.  We just use real world applications and games to get them fast and accurate.

Quoting JKronrod:

I agree that if it's causing anxiety one shouldn't 'force,' but the goal should be to get the kids to the point that they AREN'T stressed by this type of work, and the only way to do that is, eventually, to practice in a timed environment.  It's like sports or anything else: speed and confidence are important and those only come with repetitiion and practice AND competition (in this case against the clock).  Sure there might be some stress, but is it CONSTRUCTIVE so that they improve and feel confident or is it DESTRUCTIVE causing anxiety? Simply saying no timed tests, ever (although I don't know that's what you are saying) is going to do them no favors when they need to be able to figure out whether a particular business deal is good or bad in their head, quickly, or be able to do a ball-park estimate, fast, for a client about the costs of a remodel. There is always going to be stress in the real world.  Timed tests help to prepare them for that.   

 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 Nope, no timed tests whatsoever here.  I do have the kids play math games on the computer which is a timed thing, but I do not think timed tests really do anything but cause anxiety.  There are other ways to learn automaticity which is what the PS is trying for there.  They have a large # of students per teacher and really do not have the time necessary to do the other ways of getting the kids fast at their facts.  If your child can do the timed tests and not get anxious about it, or they even like doing it, then sure, but don't just do it because the PS is doing it.

 

 

 


 

JKronrod
by Bronze Member on Oct. 7, 2013 at 3:19 PM

 Well, in the past we've agreed on a lot of things, so I'm happy to agree to disagree on this point.  (Although I think the "public school thinking" comment was a bit of a low blow :-). ) To the OP -- there are different views on the subject, figure out what's right for you and your child, and good luck!


Quoting bluerooffarm:

I don't think there is any single kind of test or kind of learning activity that I would say is important for "most children." That is public school thinking IMO. All children are different. I can teach performing quickly and dealing with stress without timed tests and it is a bit silly to think it isn't good for most children. There is no need for timed tests. We have more time one-on-one with our kids in order to bring them up to the automaticity required for life. We do not need to give them timed tests. I am quite capable of speaking and writing persuasively without doing timed tests. This mother ask for opinions. My opinion is that they are not necessary. There is no "winning" this argument, because you are not going to change my mind and this woman needs to know that there are those of us that do not put our kids through timed tests and our kids turn out just fine.
Quoting JKronrod:

I understand the position,  but I think that being able to handle stress and perform under stressful conditions is part of what a child needs to learn.  Not "freezing up" is important.  Part of this may  be my personal experience -- my profession requires that I both be able to speak and write persuasively and clearly under stressful conditions, and while I don't have to do computations quickly, I once did apply for a position  where that WAS part of the job. This was straight out of college - and although not completely pre-calculator -- I'm in my fifties -- this was not a position where their use would have been acceptable at that time.  I got the offer (although I didn't accept it for other reasons) in part because I was able to keep my cool and do the math -- literally.  I want to be clear that I'm NOT suggesting that you do these types of tests if the child is getting anxiety or otherwise being damaged, you have to build up to it, but I think avoiding them altogether for most children is not a good idea either. 

 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 I disagree.  I don't think timed tests are ever necessary and I do not believe that timed tests are helpful in the later in life.  My kids can do mental math very quickly when it is needed, but they have never done timed tests.  They cook and they can quickly double, triple or quadruple a recipe in their heads.  We just use real world applications and games to get them fast and accurate.

Quoting JKronrod:

I agree that if it's causing anxiety one shouldn't 'force,' but the goal should be to get the kids to the point that they AREN'T stressed by this type of work, and the only way to do that is, eventually, to practice in a timed environment.  It's like sports or anything else: speed and confidence are important and those only come with repetitiion and practice AND competition (in this case against the clock).  Sure there might be some stress, but is it CONSTRUCTIVE so that they improve and feel confident or is it DESTRUCTIVE causing anxiety? Simply saying no timed tests, ever (although I don't know that's what you are saying) is going to do them no favors when they need to be able to figure out whether a particular business deal is good or bad in their head, quickly, or be able to do a ball-park estimate, fast, for a client about the costs of a remodel. There is always going to be stress in the real world.  Timed tests help to prepare them for that.   

 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 Nope, no timed tests whatsoever here.  I do have the kids play math games on the computer which is a timed thing, but I do not think timed tests really do anything but cause anxiety.  There are other ways to learn automaticity which is what the PS is trying for there.  They have a large # of students per teacher and really do not have the time necessary to do the other ways of getting the kids fast at their facts.  If your child can do the timed tests and not get anxious about it, or they even like doing it, then sure, but don't just do it because the PS is doing it.

 

 

 

 

 


 

bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Oct. 7, 2013 at 3:24 PM

 I apologize if it was a low blow, I just meant that the thought that most kids need some type of learning activity is one of the reasons that I homeschool, to do what I think is best for my child without the pressure to do what others do.  Seriously, it was pretty snarky and I do apologize.

Quoting JKronrod:

 Well, in the past we've agreed on a lot of things, so I'm happy to agree to disagree on this point.  (Although I think the "public school thinking" comment was a bit of a low blow :-). ) To the OP -- there are different views on the subject, figure out what's right for you and your child, and good luck!

 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

I don't think there is any single kind of test or kind of learning activity that I would say is important for "most children." That is public school thinking IMO. All children are different. I can teach performing quickly and dealing with stress without timed tests and it is a bit silly to think it isn't good for most children. There is no need for timed tests. We have more time one-on-one with our kids in order to bring them up to the automaticity required for life. We do not need to give them timed tests. I am quite capable of speaking and writing persuasively without doing timed tests. This mother ask for opinions. My opinion is that they are not necessary. There is no "winning" this argument, because you are not going to change my mind and this woman needs to know that there are those of us that do not put our kids through timed tests and our kids turn out just fine.
Quoting JKronrod:

I understand the position,  but I think that being able to handle stress and perform under stressful conditions is part of what a child needs to learn.  Not "freezing up" is important.  Part of this may  be my personal experience -- my profession requires that I both be able to speak and write persuasively and clearly under stressful conditions, and while I don't have to do computations quickly, I once did apply for a position  where that WAS part of the job. This was straight out of college - and although not completely pre-calculator -- I'm in my fifties -- this was not a position where their use would have been acceptable at that time.  I got the offer (although I didn't accept it for other reasons) in part because I was able to keep my cool and do the math -- literally.  I want to be clear that I'm NOT suggesting that you do these types of tests if the child is getting anxiety or otherwise being damaged, you have to build up to it, but I think avoiding them altogether for most children is not a good idea either. 

 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 I disagree.  I don't think timed tests are ever necessary and I do not believe that timed tests are helpful in the later in life.  My kids can do mental math very quickly when it is needed, but they have never done timed tests.  They cook and they can quickly double, triple or quadruple a recipe in their heads.  We just use real world applications and games to get them fast and accurate.

Quoting JKronrod:

I agree that if it's causing anxiety one shouldn't 'force,' but the goal should be to get the kids to the point that they AREN'T stressed by this type of work, and the only way to do that is, eventually, to practice in a timed environment.  It's like sports or anything else: speed and confidence are important and those only come with repetitiion and practice AND competition (in this case against the clock).  Sure there might be some stress, but is it CONSTRUCTIVE so that they improve and feel confident or is it DESTRUCTIVE causing anxiety? Simply saying no timed tests, ever (although I don't know that's what you are saying) is going to do them no favors when they need to be able to figure out whether a particular business deal is good or bad in their head, quickly, or be able to do a ball-park estimate, fast, for a client about the costs of a remodel. There is always going to be stress in the real world.  Timed tests help to prepare them for that.   

 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 Nope, no timed tests whatsoever here.  I do have the kids play math games on the computer which is a timed thing, but I do not think timed tests really do anything but cause anxiety.  There are other ways to learn automaticity which is what the PS is trying for there.  They have a large # of students per teacher and really do not have the time necessary to do the other ways of getting the kids fast at their facts.  If your child can do the timed tests and not get anxious about it, or they even like doing it, then sure, but don't just do it because the PS is doing it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

JKronrod
by Bronze Member on Oct. 7, 2013 at 5:19 PM
1 mom liked this

 No problem!  Hence the smiley face....


Quoting bluerooffarm:

 I apologize if it was a low blow, I just meant that the thought that most kids need some type of learning activity is one of the reasons that I homeschool, to do what I think is best for my child without the pressure to do what others do.  Seriously, it was pretty snarky and I do apologize.

Quoting JKronrod:

 Well, in the past we've agreed on a lot of things, so I'm happy to agree to disagree on this point.  (Although I think the "public school thinking" comment was a bit of a low blow :-). ) To the OP -- there are different views on the subject, figure out what's right for you and your child, and good luck!

 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

I don't think there is any single kind of test or kind of learning activity that I would say is important for "most children." That is public school thinking IMO. All children are different. I can teach performing quickly and dealing with stress without timed tests and it is a bit silly to think it isn't good for most children. There is no need for timed tests. We have more time one-on-one with our kids in order to bring them up to the automaticity required for life. We do not need to give them timed tests. I am quite capable of speaking and writing persuasively without doing timed tests. This mother ask for opinions. My opinion is that they are not necessary. There is no "winning" this argument, because you are not going to change my mind and this woman needs to know that there are those of us that do not put our kids through timed tests and our kids turn out just fine.
Quoting JKronrod:

I understand the position,  but I think that being able to handle stress and perform under stressful conditions is part of what a child needs to learn.  Not "freezing up" is important.  Part of this may  be my personal experience -- my profession requires that I both be able to speak and write persuasively and clearly under stressful conditions, and while I don't have to do computations quickly, I once did apply for a position  where that WAS part of the job. This was straight out of college - and although not completely pre-calculator -- I'm in my fifties -- this was not a position where their use would have been acceptable at that time.  I got the offer (although I didn't accept it for other reasons) in part because I was able to keep my cool and do the math -- literally.  I want to be clear that I'm NOT suggesting that you do these types of tests if the child is getting anxiety or otherwise being damaged, you have to build up to it, but I think avoiding them altogether for most children is not a good idea either. 

 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 I disagree.  I don't think timed tests are ever necessary and I do not believe that timed tests are helpful in the later in life.  My kids can do mental math very quickly when it is needed, but they have never done timed tests.  They cook and they can quickly double, triple or quadruple a recipe in their heads.  We just use real world applications and games to get them fast and accurate.

Quoting JKronrod:

I agree that if it's causing anxiety one shouldn't 'force,' but the goal should be to get the kids to the point that they AREN'T stressed by this type of work, and the only way to do that is, eventually, to practice in a timed environment.  It's like sports or anything else: speed and confidence are important and those only come with repetitiion and practice AND competition (in this case against the clock).  Sure there might be some stress, but is it CONSTRUCTIVE so that they improve and feel confident or is it DESTRUCTIVE causing anxiety? Simply saying no timed tests, ever (although I don't know that's what you are saying) is going to do them no favors when they need to be able to figure out whether a particular business deal is good or bad in their head, quickly, or be able to do a ball-park estimate, fast, for a client about the costs of a remodel. There is always going to be stress in the real world.  Timed tests help to prepare them for that.   

 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 Nope, no timed tests whatsoever here.  I do have the kids play math games on the computer which is a timed thing, but I do not think timed tests really do anything but cause anxiety.  There are other ways to learn automaticity which is what the PS is trying for there.  They have a large # of students per teacher and really do not have the time necessary to do the other ways of getting the kids fast at their facts.  If your child can do the timed tests and not get anxious about it, or they even like doing it, then sure, but don't just do it because the PS is doing it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

hipmomto3
by Bronze Member on Oct. 7, 2013 at 10:06 PM

We use Saxon 2 for our 2nd grader. At this point, he's not done carrying or borrowing, but he does do timed tests once in awhile. Saxon builds slowly and sometimes I think we are NEVER getting anywhere, but I look ahead 10 or 20 lessons and see that yes, we are adding in new skills. It just feels slow. :)

IDK if timed tests are good or bad. Depends on the kid. My son (2nd grade) gets stressed out about them, so half the time I don't time him and just keep an eye on the clock myself. My 5th grader on the other hand loves teh challenge (she does Saxon 54).

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

close Join now to connect to
other members!
Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN