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ONLY creating lesson plans and assignments that make your child happy

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Do you make lessons that will keep your child happy?  If they are unhappy with an assignment, will you change it?  For example, if a child hates worksheets, will you throw out the worksheets and figure out another method to teach the subject?  My 3rd grader hates everything school related.  I could easily teach everything in a "fun" way, but I feel like he needs to learn to do things he doesn't want to do too.  We all have times in life where we have to do things we don't want to do, but we do them anyway.  I ask this because he's actually in a private school, and is refusing to do worksheets, writing assignments, and occasionally reading.  Science, History and Art he loves.  I could easily bring him home to homeschool because my 7 year old is homeschooled, but I don't want to give him this idea that just because he doesn't "want" to do the work, then mommy will save you, homeschool you with only "fun" lessons, no more tough assignments....only what makes you happy.  Am I crazy to think that my kids should have to learn that they will have to do things they don't always want to do?  Do you make your kids do assignments even if they don't like it, refuse, get mad, throw a fit, take forever, etc?

by on Oct. 10, 2013 at 7:21 PM
Replies (31-36):
jen2150
by Silver Member on Oct. 14, 2013 at 7:17 AM
1 mom liked this
Thank you. You made my day. I was beginning to think everything was falling on deaf ears.


Quoting paganbaby:

clappingI aspire to be like you!

Quoting jen2150:

I agree there are things we don't enjoy. My sons have chores. We just do them together. We are a family so I talk to them about how families work together. They make their lunches, sometimes suppers, do their own laundry, clean their own bathroom, volunteer to help me, vacuum, help with our hobby farm. I just explain why we do things. I treat them with respect and never let treat me or others with disrespect. Learning should always be fun in my book. If something isn't fun for them then I change how we go about doing it. My sons know why cleaning the toilet is important so they do it. They don't want a stinky bathroom anymore than I do.

Right now we are doing US history this year. I am making a 9 by 6 foot map of the US. We just finished Texas and it barely fit on one poster board. It is a lot of fun. We also just started reading the Caption's Dog. It is the story of Lewis and Clark told from the point of view of their dog. They are also listening to audio cd's on stories of our great country. My sons are in 4th and 6th grade and I have yet to hit something that can't be learned in a fun way. We have done world and US history pretty much every year. We have also done Chemistry and Physics at my sons request. Last year we had a blast studying the periodic table. I am also creating a class called Creative Math. We are learning geometry and math by using k'nex, origami and art projects. My kids even have fun learning their spelling words. This afternoon my 9 year old spent an hour writing his comic book. I had a hard time pulling him away so I could start supper. I started out traditional and hated it. My sons were losing their love of learning. They were just doing things to get them done. They were begging me to do more Math. I know this method is hard for some people to grasp but it works beautifully for so many kids. There is a lot of research that favors the unschooling method.



Quoting TJandKarasMom:

I guess I just still think there are things in life no one enjoys doing, but they need to get done. So I feel if I am making every single thing fun for my kids, I am doing them a disservice overall. I don't see how cleaning the toilet could EVER be fun, but it needs to be done regularly, so I do it. Some things in life are just not fun. So if my DD is complaining about studying her math facts, I tell her that everyone has to do things they don't like to do sometimes, and then I also find math games and other ways to help her solidify the skill...but she doesn't get out of doing something just because it isn't fun for her.



I think unschooling can be awesome, I think kids learn a lot when they are interested and want to learn about something. But I also think things can get missed if they are not interested. My son learned to read at 4, basically on his own because he was interested, I do think most kids will show an interest in something like reading...but learning about ancient Egypt or how our country was founded? My son may have been interested on his own, but my daughter never would have...but there are some things she should know before college...whether they are fun things or not.



I think homeschooling should be fun in many ways, but I also thing kids need to learn independence and responsibility, so my kids have chores-no one enjoys the chores, but that's life..dishes and laundry will always need to be done, along with cleaning the bathroom and taking out the trash and tons of other mundane tasks. Making their whole life fun, IMO, would make their adulthood kind of suck.





Quoting jen2150:

Child led learning actually take more parental guidance not less. It is about going over things when the time is right. I never skip anything. I just go back when the time is right. There is such a thing as too early. It is much more common to try things too early than too late. When my son was 3 he started to learn to write. He kept getting upset and frustrated so I knew it was too soon. so I waited 6 months and it was a completely different experience at a later time. Sure there are some things they enjoy more. I work with their interests and not against them. I never say we have to do this even though it is not fun. It sends the wrong message. I tell them if it isn't fun how can we make it fun. It gets their creativity going. I always love the ideas they come up with.





We do a combination of my own studies, curriculum and reading living books. We also use k'nex education series a lot. My sons also come up with their own ideas and projects as well. I think history is best learned through living books. There are very few good history textbooks. I help create an atmosphere of interest before we study anything.



Child led learning does not mean your kids never try things that are hard. We are taking karate together. It is very hard work. I am doing it with them. This year my son is learning how to play chess. He didn't want to try it. I told him to try for a month if he doesn't like he can always drop it. So we both agreed that he would give it a try. He loves it and enjoys learning how to play. Unschooled kids try new things all the time. I also lead by example. I am enthusiastic about what i am learning and read every day on all kinds of things. My kids are very curious and independent thinkers. My son even asked me to teach him to read when he was 5 years old. I simply created an environment that would make him want to learn. Unschooling is an very hands on and time consuming method. It is also a lot of fun.






Quoting TJandKarasMom:

I have to agree with AutymnsMommy...maybe kids will eventually get to a point they are interested and 'ready' for a topic, but then it could be awfully late. I am considering myself in comparison with AutymnsMommy's DD...I HATED history, had absolutely no interest...I went to ps and had many different types of teachers, and still was never interested. Now I look like a moron when I don't know much about it..I am now showing an interest and am wanting to skip ahead in our history to get to the parts I want to learn...but I'm 30. If I let my kids skip the stuff they aren't interested in, my DD wouldn't read a history book until she was 30, and would never know her math facts. And DS wouldn't have legible handwriting or have any idea who Van Gogh is.





I think there is a lot to be said for child led learning, but I still think they need suggestions and guidance from parents, otherwise they would just skip the hard stuff because who wants to do things that are too hard? But what will you learn if you never try?








Quoting jen2150:

So do I. I also trust that my children will be ready when the time is right. My boys are polar opposites. I also run a co-op and whenever I design a class I approach from many angles at once. I never teach anything I don't love. I develop a love for it first. Enthusiasm is contagious. This Year I designed a creative math class that uses k'nex, oragami and art to teach math.










Quoting AutymsMommy:

I recognize that my children are unique individuals with interests, likes, and dislikes all their own. *shrug*












Quoting jen2150:

Sorry I disagree. I am an eternal optimist. There is always a way. :-)














Quoting AutymsMommy:


Just because it is taught in a fun way, doesn't mean it's engaging to all children. My daughter didn't really give a lick about history, no matter how much time, energy, and money I spent trying to make it fun. She simply doesn't like history. She still needs to know it though. Same with writing for her - still important, but there is no "making it fun, making it engaging, etc" and forcing a child with no natural interest to enjoy it.







Quoting jen2150:

I also wanted to add that it is important to remember real learning happens when children are engaged. We are taught in school that there are things we hate but we still need to learn them. It is not true. I don't think there is anything that can't be taught in a fun way.





























paganbaby
by Silver Member on Oct. 14, 2013 at 10:41 AM

Oh not at all. It's refreshing to see someone who who doesn't view learning as a dreaded chore to be done.

There's nothing my kids need to learn that can't be taught in a fun, engaging way. And if they're still resistant, then it's not time. Like you said, things can be taught too early, but rarely too late. It's funny how history is brought up frequently. I hated history. I had no interest in our late presidents, long ago wars, what the settlers did or anything else. Yes, I sat through it in school and I didn't absorb a bit of it. Now as an adult, I still have no interest in it and it doesn't affect my day to day life.

That's not to say I won't teach the kids. I'm paraphrasing a book about Greek God/desses right now. The kids love it because I read it in a funny way and add a lot of gestures. We even act out certain scenes,lol. You know, now that I think of it; if taught with some creativity, I think even history could have kept my interest. Hmmm...

Quoting jen2150:

Thank you. You made my day. I was beginning to think everything was falling on deaf ears.


Quoting paganbaby:

clappingI aspire to be like you!

Quoting jen2150:

I agree there are things we don't enjoy. My sons have chores. We just do them together. We are a family so I talk to them about how families work together. They make their lunches, sometimes suppers, do their own laundry, clean their own bathroom, volunteer to help me, vacuum, help with our hobby farm. I just explain why we do things. I treat them with respect and never let treat me or others with disrespect. Learning should always be fun in my book. If something isn't fun for them then I change how we go about doing it. My sons know why cleaning the toilet is important so they do it. They don't want a stinky bathroom anymore than I do.

Right now we are doing US history this year. I am making a 9 by 6 foot map of the US. We just finished Texas and it barely fit on one poster board. It is a lot of fun. We also just started reading the Caption's Dog. It is the story of Lewis and Clark told from the point of view of their dog. They are also listening to audio cd's on stories of our great country. My sons are in 4th and 6th grade and I have yet to hit something that can't be learned in a fun way. We have done world and US history pretty much every year. We have also done Chemistry and Physics at my sons request. Last year we had a blast studying the periodic table. I am also creating a class called Creative Math. We are learning geometry and math by using k'nex, origami and art projects. My kids even have fun learning their spelling words. This afternoon my 9 year old spent an hour writing his comic book. I had a hard time pulling him away so I could start supper. I started out traditional and hated it. My sons were losing their love of learning. They were just doing things to get them done. They were begging me to do more Math. I know this method is hard for some people to grasp but it works beautifully for so many kids. There is a lot of research that favors the unschooling method.


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TJandKarasMom
by Debbie on Oct. 14, 2013 at 11:38 AM

I really think it's great to make things fun for them, especially the younger they are-the more fun it can be.  But there will always be something that is not fun, and I think it's better for them to learn that now than to go to start their first job at 16 and have to sit through those training videos-would I expect the manager to make an exception for my 16 year old and make training super fun for them so that they will keep the job?  No way.  I sat through those boring videos more times than I can count.  I just did it starting this new job I started in August and this is a CAREER type job.  There are parts of my job that are not fun, the reason I do my job is mostly because it is enjoyable for me, but there will always be parts that aren't.  I think if life had been nothing but fun for 18 years, I would be just like my younger brother-in-laws who have yet to hold down a job or finish college, or do their own laundry (they are 20 and 22).  They have lots of fun, but refuse to be responsible beyond bathing themselves and ordering dinner. (just to be clear, they were not homeschooled...I don't think schooling alone was the issue).

I really love making things fun for my kids.  I love reading your ideas because I think you have great ones and could see using lots of them!  It's just that in my house, if I spend my time making a lesson and a child doesn't want to do it because it's not fun-that's just too bad.  I don't have time to make lessons twice.  I will not repeat a lesson if it's completely horrible and the child got nothing from it-whether it was fun or not isn't my point.  But if it was miserable, I will not make them do it again, I will typically find another way for them to try it, but they usually do have to at least put their best effort in to complete it.  But for some things there isn't the option to change it.  DS, no matter what I give him to write about, he HATES to write, but it's too bad, in life you have to write, so in homeschool you have to write.  I try to make it fun and give him different ways of doing it, but no matter what, he complains.  That doesn't mean that at 11 he is just not read for it.  It means that he just has no interest.  Which is fine, I don't expect him to be a writer, but I do expect him to be capable of putting his bright thoughts to paper.

Feel free to share your creative math lesson with us, it sounds like lots of fun!  I really do think you have great ideas...maybe I am just not creative enough to be capable of making everything fun. 


Quoting jen2150:

I agree there are things we don't enjoy. My sons have chores. We just do them together. We are a family so I talk to them about how families work together. They make their lunches, sometimes suppers, do their own laundry, clean their own bathroom, volunteer to help me, vacuum, help with our hobby farm. I just explain why we do things. I treat them with respect and never let treat me or others with disrespect. Learning should always be fun in my book. If something isn't fun for them then I change how we go about doing it. My sons know why cleaning the toilet is important so they do it. They don't want a stinky bathroom anymore than I do. Right now we are doing US history this year. I am making a 9 by 6 foot map of the US. We just finished Texas and it barely fit on one poster board. It is a lot of fun. We also just started reading the Caption's Dog. It is the story of Lewis and Clark told from the point of view of their dog. They are also listening to audio cd's on stories of our great country. My sons are in 4th and 6th grade and I have yet to hit something that can't be learned in a fun way. We have done world and US history pretty much every year. We have also done Chemistry and Physics at my sons request. Last year we had a blast studying the periodic table. I am also creating a class called Creative Math. We are learning geometry and math by using k'nex, origami and art projects. My kids even have fun learning their spelling words. This afternoon my 9 year old spent an hour writing his comic book. I had a hard time pulling him away so I could start supper. I started out traditional and hated it. My sons were losing their love of learning. They were just doing things to get them done. They were begging me to do more Math. I know this method is hard for some people to grasp but it works beautifully for so many kids. There is a lot of research that favors the unschooling method.
Quoting TJandKarasMom:

I guess I just still think there are things in life no one enjoys doing, but they need to get done. So I feel if I am making every single thing fun for my kids, I am doing them a disservice overall. I don't see how cleaning the toilet could EVER be fun, but it needs to be done regularly, so I do it. Some things in life are just not fun. So if my DD is complaining about studying her math facts, I tell her that everyone has to do things they don't like to do sometimes, and then I also find math games and other ways to help her solidify the skill...but she doesn't get out of doing something just because it isn't fun for her.

I think unschooling can be awesome, I think kids learn a lot when they are interested and want to learn about something. But I also think things can get missed if they are not interested. My son learned to read at 4, basically on his own because he was interested, I do think most kids will show an interest in something like reading...but learning about ancient Egypt or how our country was founded? My son may have been interested on his own, but my daughter never would have...but there are some things she should know before college...whether they are fun things or not.

I think homeschooling should be fun in many ways, but I also thing kids need to learn independence and responsibility, so my kids have chores-no one enjoys the chores, but that's life..dishes and laundry will always need to be done, along with cleaning the bathroom and taking out the trash and tons of other mundane tasks. Making their whole life fun, IMO, would make their adulthood kind of suck.


Quoting jen2150:

Child led learning actually take more parental guidance not less. It is about going over things when the time is right. I never skip anything. I just go back when the time is right. There is such a thing as too early. It is much more common to try things too early than too late. When my son was 3 he started to learn to write. He kept getting upset and frustrated so I knew it was too soon. so I waited 6 months and it was a completely different experience at a later time. Sure there are some things they enjoy more. I work with their interests and not against them. I never say we have to do this even though it is not fun. It sends the wrong message. I tell them if it isn't fun how can we make it fun. It gets their creativity going. I always love the ideas they come up with.


We do a combination of my own studies, curriculum and reading living books. We also use k'nex education series a lot. My sons also come up with their own ideas and projects as well. I think history is best learned through living books. There are very few good history textbooks. I help create an atmosphere of interest before we study anything.

Child led learning does not mean your kids never try things that are hard. We are taking karate together. It is very hard work. I am doing it with them. This year my son is learning how to play chess. He didn't want to try it. I told him to try for a month if he doesn't like he can always drop it. So we both agreed that he would give it a try. He loves it and enjoys learning how to play. Unschooled kids try new things all the time. I also lead by example. I am enthusiastic about what i am learning and read every day on all kinds of things. My kids are very curious and independent thinkers. My son even asked me to teach him to read when he was 5 years old. I simply created an environment that would make him want to learn. Unschooling is an very hands on and time consuming method. It is also a lot of fun.



Quoting TJandKarasMom:

I have to agree with AutymnsMommy...maybe kids will eventually get to a point they are interested and 'ready' for a topic, but then it could be awfully late. I am considering myself in comparison with AutymnsMommy's DD...I HATED history, had absolutely no interest...I went to ps and had many different types of teachers, and still was never interested. Now I look like a moron when I don't know much about it..I am now showing an interest and am wanting to skip ahead in our history to get to the parts I want to learn...but I'm 30. If I let my kids skip the stuff they aren't interested in, my DD wouldn't read a history book until she was 30, and would never know her math facts. And DS wouldn't have legible handwriting or have any idea who Van Gogh is.



I think there is a lot to be said for child led learning, but I still think they need suggestions and guidance from parents, otherwise they would just skip the hard stuff because who wants to do things that are too hard? But what will you learn if you never try?





Quoting jen2150:

So do I. I also trust that my children will be ready when the time is right. My boys are polar opposites. I also run a co-op and whenever I design a class I approach from many angles at once. I never teach anything I don't love. I develop a love for it first. Enthusiasm is contagious. This Year I designed a creative math class that uses k'nex, oragami and art to teach math.







Quoting AutymsMommy:

I recognize that my children are unique individuals with interests, likes, and dislikes all their own. *shrug*









Quoting jen2150:

Sorry I disagree. I am an eternal optimist. There is always a way. :-)











Quoting AutymsMommy:


Just because it is taught in a fun way, doesn't mean it's engaging to all children. My daughter didn't really give a lick about history, no matter how much time, energy, and money I spent trying to make it fun. She simply doesn't like history. She still needs to know it though. Same with writing for her - still important, but there is no "making it fun, making it engaging, etc" and forcing a child with no natural interest to enjoy it.






Quoting jen2150:

I also wanted to add that it is important to remember real learning happens when children are engaged. We are taught in school that there are things we hate but we still need to learn them. It is not true. I don't think there is anything that can't be taught in a fun way.






















jen2150
by Silver Member on Oct. 14, 2013 at 12:33 PM
1 mom liked this

Thanks for your response.  I try to make things a lot of fun.  I am a very creative and curious person so maybe that comes easy for me.  I don't spend a lot of time on lessons except the co-op classes that I teach.  I always have a back up plan.  I use a lot of different materials.  The funny thing is I hated Math and science in school.  They were so boring.  I find myself reading books on science for fun.  My sons have corrupted me into loving them.  LOL  It is their favorite thing to love.  I didn't like history until high school when I had a teacher that taught history like one big story.  He also had a great sense of humor.  He had a give blood sticker on George Washington's picture.


I think most things can be taught in a fun way.  They may not be super excited with everything but I think most of it can be enjoyable.  When my son started studying the human body he did not enjoy it.  I talked to him why it is important and how I was handicaped in college because I was never taught anatomy in high school.  I found a book that he loves.  It is called the Way We Work.  It goes through the human body in a way that appealed to my son.  He laid out the circulatory system by drawing a pipe system under a city to match.  It is a very cool book for boys.  He made a working lungs model.  I don't think every kid is going to love every subject but if they walked away from homeschooling and hated an entire subject then I haven't done my job.  In the end I am going to make sure I did everything in my power to make it fun.  I refuse to believe some things are never going to be enjoyable.  There is always a way.  I am an optimist at heart.   If you ever need any helpful ideas just let me know.  I love helping and I have received so many great ideas from friends that are not all my own.


I have a friend who constantly complains about math and how she and her children hate doing math.  It gave me the idea  for designing the class.  I was watching my son playing with math during his free time and it got me thinking about how to encourage kids who hate math to just play and have fun with it.    Here is the lesson plan.  https://docs.google.com/document/d/1r9qcLtsOi4-kbux2r_YhZjA6tsPkAEjHz4-WqzcUqWM/edit?usp=sharing


http://www.amazon.com/KNEX-Education-Elementary-Math-Geometry/dp/B000O94QUM/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1381768159&sr=8-1&keywords=k%27nex+math


http://www.amazon.com/Math-Motion-Origami-Classroom-K-8/dp/0964792435/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1381768208&sr=8-1&keywords=math+in+motion


Have a great week!


Quoting TJandKarasMom:

I really think it's great to make things fun for them, especially the younger they are-the more fun it can be.  But there will always be something that is not fun, and I think it's better for them to learn that now than to go to start their first job at 16 and have to sit through those training videos-would I expect the manager to make an exception for my 16 year old and make training super fun for them so that they will keep the job?  No way.  I sat through those boring videos more times than I can count.  I just did it starting this new job I started in August and this is a CAREER type job.  There are parts of my job that are not fun, the reason I do my job is mostly because it is enjoyable for me, but there will always be parts that aren't.  I think if life had been nothing but fun for 18 years, I would be just like my younger brother-in-laws who have yet to hold down a job or finish college, or do their own laundry (they are 20 and 22).  They have lots of fun, but refuse to be responsible beyond bathing themselves and ordering dinner. (just to be clear, they were not homeschooled...I don't think schooling alone was the issue).

I really love making things fun for my kids.  I love reading your ideas because I think you have great ones and could see using lots of them!  It's just that in my house, if I spend my time making a lesson and a child doesn't want to do it because it's not fun-that's just too bad.  I don't have time to make lessons twice.  I will not repeat a lesson if it's completely horrible and the child got nothing from it-whether it was fun or not isn't my point.  But if it was miserable, I will not make them do it again, I will typically find another way for them to try it, but they usually do have to at least put their best effort in to complete it.  But for some things there isn't the option to change it.  DS, no matter what I give him to write about, he HATES to write, but it's too bad, in life you have to write, so in homeschool you have to write.  I try to make it fun and give him different ways of doing it, but no matter what, he complains.  That doesn't mean that at 11 he is just not read for it.  It means that he just has no interest.  Which is fine, I don't expect him to be a writer, but I do expect him to be capable of putting his bright thoughts to paper.

Feel free to share your creative math lesson with us, it sounds like lots of fun!  I really do think you have great ideas...maybe I am just not creative enough to be capable of making everything fun. 


Quoting jen2150:

I agree there are things we don't enjoy. My sons have chores. We just do them together. We are a family so I talk to them about how families work together. They make their lunches, sometimes suppers, do their own laundry, clean their own bathroom, volunteer to help me, vacuum, help with our hobby farm. I just explain why we do things. I treat them with respect and never let treat me or others with disrespect. Learning should always be fun in my book. If something isn't fun for them then I change how we go about doing it. My sons know why cleaning the toilet is important so they do it. They don't want a stinky bathroom anymore than I do. Right now we are doing US history this year. I am making a 9 by 6 foot map of the US. We just finished Texas and it barely fit on one poster board. It is a lot of fun. We also just started reading the Caption's Dog. It is the story of Lewis and Clark told from the point of view of their dog. They are also listening to audio cd's on stories of our great country. My sons are in 4th and 6th grade and I have yet to hit something that can't be learned in a fun way. We have done world and US history pretty much every year. We have also done Chemistry and Physics at my sons request. Last year we had a blast studying the periodic table. I am also creating a class called Creative Math. We are learning geometry and math by using k'nex, origami and art projects. My kids even have fun learning their spelling words. This afternoon my 9 year old spent an hour writing his comic book. I had a hard time pulling him away so I could start supper. I started out traditional and hated it. My sons were losing their love of learning. They were just doing things to get them done. They were begging me to do more Math. I know this method is hard for some people to grasp but it works beautifully for so many kids. There is a lot of research that favors the unschooling method.
Quoting TJandKarasMom:

I guess I just still think there are things in life no one enjoys doing, but they need to get done. So I feel if I am making every single thing fun for my kids, I am doing them a disservice overall. I don't see how cleaning the toilet could EVER be fun, but it needs to be done regularly, so I do it. Some things in life are just not fun. So if my DD is complaining about studying her math facts, I tell her that everyone has to do things they don't like to do sometimes, and then I also find math games and other ways to help her solidify the skill...but she doesn't get out of doing something just because it isn't fun for her.

I think unschooling can be awesome, I think kids learn a lot when they are interested and want to learn about something. But I also think things can get missed if they are not interested. My son learned to read at 4, basically on his own because he was interested, I do think most kids will show an interest in something like reading...but learning about ancient Egypt or how our country was founded? My son may have been interested on his own, but my daughter never would have...but there are some things she should know before college...whether they are fun things or not.

I think homeschooling should be fun in many ways, but I also thing kids need to learn independence and responsibility, so my kids have chores-no one enjoys the chores, but that's life..dishes and laundry will always need to be done, along with cleaning the bathroom and taking out the trash and tons of other mundane tasks. Making their whole life fun, IMO, would make their adulthood kind of suck.


Quoting jen2150:

Child led learning actually take more parental guidance not less. It is about going over things when the time is right. I never skip anything. I just go back when the time is right. There is such a thing as too early. It is much more common to try things too early than too late. When my son was 3 he started to learn to write. He kept getting upset and frustrated so I knew it was too soon. so I waited 6 months and it was a completely different experience at a later time. Sure there are some things they enjoy more. I work with their interests and not against them. I never say we have to do this even though it is not fun. It sends the wrong message. I tell them if it isn't fun how can we make it fun. It gets their creativity going. I always love the ideas they come up with.


We do a combination of my own studies, curriculum and reading living books. We also use k'nex education series a lot. My sons also come up with their own ideas and projects as well. I think history is best learned through living books. There are very few good history textbooks. I help create an atmosphere of interest before we study anything.

Child led learning does not mean your kids never try things that are hard. We are taking karate together. It is very hard work. I am doing it with them. This year my son is learning how to play chess. He didn't want to try it. I told him to try for a month if he doesn't like he can always drop it. So we both agreed that he would give it a try. He loves it and enjoys learning how to play. Unschooled kids try new things all the time. I also lead by example. I am enthusiastic about what i am learning and read every day on all kinds of things. My kids are very curious and independent thinkers. My son even asked me to teach him to read when he was 5 years old. I simply created an environment that would make him want to learn. Unschooling is an very hands on and time consuming method. It is also a lot of fun.



Quoting TJandKarasMom:

I have to agree with AutymnsMommy...maybe kids will eventually get to a point they are interested and 'ready' for a topic, but then it could be awfully late. I am considering myself in comparison with AutymnsMommy's DD...I HATED history, had absolutely no interest...I went to ps and had many different types of teachers, and still was never interested. Now I look like a moron when I don't know much about it..I am now showing an interest and am wanting to skip ahead in our history to get to the parts I want to learn...but I'm 30. If I let my kids skip the stuff they aren't interested in, my DD wouldn't read a history book until she was 30, and would never know her math facts. And DS wouldn't have legible handwriting or have any idea who Van Gogh is.



I think there is a lot to be said for child led learning, but I still think they need suggestions and guidance from parents, otherwise they would just skip the hard stuff because who wants to do things that are too hard? But what will you learn if you never try?





Quoting jen2150:

So do I. I also trust that my children will be ready when the time is right. My boys are polar opposites. I also run a co-op and whenever I design a class I approach from many angles at once. I never teach anything I don't love. I develop a love for it first. Enthusiasm is contagious. This Year I designed a creative math class that uses k'nex, oragami and art to teach math.







Quoting AutymsMommy:

I recognize that my children are unique individuals with interests, likes, and dislikes all their own. *shrug*









Quoting jen2150:

Sorry I disagree. I am an eternal optimist. There is always a way. :-)











Quoting AutymsMommy:


Just because it is taught in a fun way, doesn't mean it's engaging to all children. My daughter didn't really give a lick about history, no matter how much time, energy, and money I spent trying to make it fun. She simply doesn't like history. She still needs to know it though. Same with writing for her - still important, but there is no "making it fun, making it engaging, etc" and forcing a child with no natural interest to enjoy it.






Quoting jen2150:

I also wanted to add that it is important to remember real learning happens when children are engaged. We are taught in school that there are things we hate but we still need to learn them. It is not true. I don't think there is anything that can't be taught in a fun way.
























tuffymama
by Bronze Member on Oct. 15, 2013 at 7:52 PM
Quoting jen2150:

Child led learning does not equal lazy and entitled. It is what works for us. My sons work very hard. I talk to them why hard work and learning is important. They are very curious, polite, hard working and thoughtful children. Child led learning does not mean children are running the show.


Quoting tuffymama:It has always been so much easier to kiss LO's behind because he is mildly autistic and profoundly domineering. However, I put my foot down when I get out of bed in the morning and I don't let it up until he goes to bed at night, because I cannot allow a four year old with a mean streak to dictate the way I run my household, and regardless of what he believes, I know best. I tailor his learning experiences to his abilities, but if I only did what he LIKES or WANTS to do, we would be digging in the dirt, tearing up the house, ripping up our workbooks, and pulling the dogs' tails all day. We do school six days a week, including his therapy activities, and he just loves to complain about half the time, but you know what? He complains when we go to the toy store and the wildlife museum, both of which are two of his favorite destinations. He's just a difficult person LOL.

Brevity, focus, and encouragement are at the forefront of my mind when I plan our weeks, and I build in fun and child-led learning opportunities. We do some form of music and/or art activity every day (and Pinterest is a big help with that). Our learning is largely literature based right now, and that approach really makes my job a lot easier.

I agree with PPs about entirely child-led learning and child-focused families creating entitled and lazy people, but only because I've seen those results with my own eyes in friends' children. Kids need to have the freedom of choice and to explore their own talents and interests, but not ALL THE TIME. That's why they have parents. Otherwise, we would drop these babies in egg sacs and just go on about our business, like insects.




It seems like you skimmed my comment to find something to be offended about.
jen2150
by Silver Member on Oct. 15, 2013 at 8:01 PM
I never said I was offended. It takes a whole lot more than that. I was just making a point. Lazy and entitled can happen in any method. Unschooling is just another method like many others. I really wish you the best in your hmeschooling journey.
Quoting tuffymama:

Quoting jen2150:

Child led learning does not equal lazy and entitled. It is what works for us. My sons work very hard. I talk to them why hard work and learning is important. They are very curious, polite, hard working and thoughtful children. Child led learning does not mean children are running the show.


Quoting tuffymama:It has always been so much easier to kiss LO's behind because he is mildly autistic and profoundly domineering. However, I put my foot down when I get out of bed in the morning and I don't let it up until he goes to bed at night, because I cannot allow a four year old with a mean streak to dictate the way I run my household, and regardless of what he believes, I know best. I tailor his learning experiences to his abilities, but if I only did what he LIKES or WANTS to do, we would be digging in the dirt, tearing up the house, ripping up our workbooks, and pulling the dogs' tails all day. We do school six days a week, including his therapy activities, and he just loves to complain about half the time, but you know what? He complains when we go to the toy store and the wildlife museum, both of which are two of his favorite destinations. He's just a difficult person LOL.

Brevity, focus, and encouragement are at the forefront of my mind when I plan our weeks, and I build in fun and child-led learning opportunities. We do some form of music and/or art activity every day (and Pinterest is a big help with that). Our learning is largely literature based right now, and that approach really makes my job a lot easier.

I agree with PPs about entirely child-led learning and child-focused families creating entitled and lazy people, but only because I've seen those results with my own eyes in friends' children. Kids need to have the freedom of choice and to explore their own talents and interests, but not ALL THE TIME. That's why they have parents. Otherwise, we would drop these babies in egg sacs and just go on about our business, like insects.




It seems like you skimmed my comment to find something to be offended about.

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