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ONLY creating lesson plans and assignments that make your child happy

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Do you make lessons that will keep your child happy?  If they are unhappy with an assignment, will you change it?  For example, if a child hates worksheets, will you throw out the worksheets and figure out another method to teach the subject?  My 3rd grader hates everything school related.  I could easily teach everything in a "fun" way, but I feel like he needs to learn to do things he doesn't want to do too.  We all have times in life where we have to do things we don't want to do, but we do them anyway.  I ask this because he's actually in a private school, and is refusing to do worksheets, writing assignments, and occasionally reading.  Science, History and Art he loves.  I could easily bring him home to homeschool because my 7 year old is homeschooled, but I don't want to give him this idea that just because he doesn't "want" to do the work, then mommy will save you, homeschool you with only "fun" lessons, no more tough assignments....only what makes you happy.  Am I crazy to think that my kids should have to learn that they will have to do things they don't always want to do?  Do you make your kids do assignments even if they don't like it, refuse, get mad, throw a fit, take forever, etc?

by on Oct. 10, 2013 at 7:21 PM
Replies (11-20):
Bleacheddecay
by Bronze Member on Oct. 10, 2013 at 10:35 PM

This. At first, in particular, I think it's important to make things more enjoyable so they are able to shed the school mind set and we should shed that too.


Quoting Leissaintexas:

I agree that all kids need to learn to do stuff that's not  fun. But, I also feel like we can restore that love of learning in our kids so that even the most mundane thing can be at least tolerable. And not because its entertaining, but for the sake of learning. Just today, I talked to my math-hating son why I was so adamant about him memorizing "those stupid mulitplication facts". Yes, they're boring, and hard, and dumb. But as a kid who spent years in "special classes" for math and being called a retard becasue I was slow at math, I would rather he not spend 40 years being bad at math and feeling bad about himself. His attitude change was remarkable. He suddenly didn't mind the repetitive speed drills I was having him do. A good attitude can change your whole perspective.



jen2150
by Silver Member on Oct. 12, 2013 at 8:31 AM
I also wanted to add that it is important to remember real learning happens when children are engaged. We are taught in school that there are things we hate but we still need to learn them. It is not true. I don't think there is anything that can't be taught in a fun way.
AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Oct. 12, 2013 at 8:55 AM
1 mom liked this


Just because it is taught in a fun way, doesn't mean it's engaging to all children. My daughter didn't really give a lick about history, no matter how much time, energy, and money I spent trying to make it fun. She simply doesn't like history. She still needs to know it though. Same with writing for her - still important, but there is no "making it fun, making it engaging, etc" and forcing a child with no natural interest to enjoy it.

Quoting jen2150:

I also wanted to add that it is important to remember real learning happens when children are engaged. We are taught in school that there are things we hate but we still need to learn them. It is not true. I don't think there is anything that can't be taught in a fun way.



I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















jen2150
by Silver Member on Oct. 12, 2013 at 8:59 AM
3 moms liked this
Sorry I disagree. I am an eternal optimist. There is always a way. :-)


Quoting AutymsMommy:


Just because it is taught in a fun way, doesn't mean it's engaging to all children. My daughter didn't really give a lick about history, no matter how much time, energy, and money I spent trying to make it fun. She simply doesn't like history. She still needs to know it though. Same with writing for her - still important, but there is no "making it fun, making it engaging, etc" and forcing a child with no natural interest to enjoy it.


Quoting jen2150:

I also wanted to add that it is important to remember real learning happens when children are engaged. We are taught in school that there are things we hate but we still need to learn them. It is not true. I don't think there is anything that can't be taught in a fun way.





AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Oct. 12, 2013 at 9:27 AM
I recognize that my children are unique individuals with interests, likes, and dislikes all their own. *shrug*


Quoting jen2150:

Sorry I disagree. I am an eternal optimist. There is always a way. :-)




Quoting AutymsMommy:


Just because it is taught in a fun way, doesn't mean it's engaging to all children. My daughter didn't really give a lick about history, no matter how much time, energy, and money I spent trying to make it fun. She simply doesn't like history. She still needs to know it though. Same with writing for her - still important, but there is no "making it fun, making it engaging, etc" and forcing a child with no natural interest to enjoy it.



Quoting jen2150:

I also wanted to add that it is important to remember real learning happens when children are engaged. We are taught in school that there are things we hate but we still need to learn them. It is not true. I don't think there is anything that can't be taught in a fun way.







jen2150
by Silver Member on Oct. 12, 2013 at 10:07 AM
1 mom liked this
So do I. I also trust that my children will be ready when the time is right. My boys are polar opposites. I also run a co-op and whenever I design a class I approach from many angles at once. I never teach anything I don't love. I develop a love for it first. Enthusiasm is contagious. This Year I designed a creative math class that uses k'nex, oragami and art to teach math.


Quoting AutymsMommy:

I recognize that my children are unique individuals with interests, likes, and dislikes all their own. *shrug*




Quoting jen2150:

Sorry I disagree. I am an eternal optimist. There is always a way. :-)






Quoting AutymsMommy:


Just because it is taught in a fun way, doesn't mean it's engaging to all children. My daughter didn't really give a lick about history, no matter how much time, energy, and money I spent trying to make it fun. She simply doesn't like history. She still needs to know it though. Same with writing for her - still important, but there is no "making it fun, making it engaging, etc" and forcing a child with no natural interest to enjoy it.




Quoting jen2150:

I also wanted to add that it is important to remember real learning happens when children are engaged. We are taught in school that there are things we hate but we still need to learn them. It is not true. I don't think there is anything that can't be taught in a fun way.









tuffymama
by Bronze Member on Oct. 12, 2013 at 10:07 AM
It has always been so much easier to kiss LO's behind because he is mildly autistic and profoundly domineering. However, I put my foot down when I get out of bed in the morning and I don't let it up until he goes to bed at night, because I cannot allow a four year old with a mean streak to dictate the way I run my household, and regardless of what he believes, I know best. I tailor his learning experiences to his abilities, but if I only did what he LIKES or WANTS to do, we would be digging in the dirt, tearing up the house, ripping up our workbooks, and pulling the dogs' tails all day. We do school six days a week, including his therapy activities, and he just loves to complain about half the time, but you know what? He complains when we go to the toy store and the wildlife museum, both of which are two of his favorite destinations. He's just a difficult person LOL.

Brevity, focus, and encouragement are at the forefront of my mind when I plan our weeks, and I build in fun and child-led learning opportunities. We do some form of music and/or art activity every day (and Pinterest is a big help with that). Our learning is largely literature based right now, and that approach really makes my job a lot easier.

I agree with PPs about entirely child-led learning and child-focused families creating entitled and lazy people, but only because I've seen those results with my own eyes in friends' children. Kids need to have the freedom of choice and to explore their own talents and interests, but not ALL THE TIME. That's why they have parents. Otherwise, we would drop these babies in egg sacs and just go on about our business, like insects.
jen2150
by Silver Member on Oct. 12, 2013 at 10:16 AM
2 moms liked this
Child led learning does not equal lazy and entitled. It is what works for us. My sons work very hard. I talk to them why hard work and learning is important. They are very curious, polite, hard working and thoughtful children. Child led learning does not mean children are running the show.


Quoting tuffymama:

It has always been so much easier to kiss LO's behind because he is mildly autistic and profoundly domineering. However, I put my foot down when I get out of bed in the morning and I don't let it up until he goes to bed at night, because I cannot allow a four year old with a mean streak to dictate the way I run my household, and regardless of what he believes, I know best. I tailor his learning experiences to his abilities, but if I only did what he LIKES or WANTS to do, we would be digging in the dirt, tearing up the house, ripping up our workbooks, and pulling the dogs' tails all day. We do school six days a week, including his therapy activities, and he just loves to complain about half the time, but you know what? He complains when we go to the toy store and the wildlife museum, both of which are two of his favorite destinations. He's just a difficult person LOL.



Brevity, focus, and encouragement are at the forefront of my mind when I plan our weeks, and I build in fun and child-led learning opportunities. We do some form of music and/or art activity every day (and Pinterest is a big help with that). Our learning is largely literature based right now, and that approach really makes my job a lot easier.



I agree with PPs about entirely child-led learning and child-focused families creating entitled and lazy people, but only because I've seen those results with my own eyes in friends' children. Kids need to have the freedom of choice and to explore their own talents and interests, but not ALL THE TIME. That's why they have parents. Otherwise, we would drop these babies in egg sacs and just go on about our business, like insects.

TidewaterClan
by on Oct. 12, 2013 at 2:17 PM

 We go through our workbooks, lessons, etc., BUT I stop and pull out math/language arts, etc., games if we get to a subject my girls need more work on.  I want them to be completely comfortable and confident in all of their skills.  Extra practice by solving a problem, rolling a die, and following a happy path on a game board work wonders.  So does taking a walk in the woods and observing the birds, animals, plants, creek and the way it ripples, then writing about it.  I try to keep it as fun and fresh as possible.

We have some extremely wonderful outside and inside museums to visit, as far as history and social studies go.  If you can bring it to life, it brings the life into it!

TJandKarasMom
by Debbie on Oct. 13, 2013 at 3:58 PM
1 mom liked this
I have to agree with AutymnsMommy...maybe kids will eventually get to a point they are interested and 'ready' for a topic, but then it could be awfully late. I am considering myself in comparison with AutymnsMommy's DD...I HATED history, had absolutely no interest...I went to ps and had many different types of teachers, and still was never interested. Now I look like a moron when I don't know much about it..I am now showing an interest and am wanting to skip ahead in our history to get to the parts I want to learn...but I'm 30. If I let my kids skip the stuff they aren't interested in, my DD wouldn't read a history book until she was 30, and would never know her math facts. And DS wouldn't have legible handwriting or have any idea who Van Gogh is.

I think there is a lot to be said for child led learning, but I still think they need suggestions and guidance from parents, otherwise they would just skip the hard stuff because who wants to do things that are too hard? But what will you learn if you never try?


Quoting jen2150:

So do I. I also trust that my children will be ready when the time is right. My boys are polar opposites. I also run a co-op and whenever I design a class I approach from many angles at once. I never teach anything I don't love. I develop a love for it first. Enthusiasm is contagious. This Year I designed a creative math class that uses k'nex, oragami and art to teach math.




Quoting AutymsMommy:

I recognize that my children are unique individuals with interests, likes, and dislikes all their own. *shrug*






Quoting jen2150:

Sorry I disagree. I am an eternal optimist. There is always a way. :-)








Quoting AutymsMommy:


Just because it is taught in a fun way, doesn't mean it's engaging to all children. My daughter didn't really give a lick about history, no matter how much time, energy, and money I spent trying to make it fun. She simply doesn't like history. She still needs to know it though. Same with writing for her - still important, but there is no "making it fun, making it engaging, etc" and forcing a child with no natural interest to enjoy it.





Quoting jen2150:

I also wanted to add that it is important to remember real learning happens when children are engaged. We are taught in school that there are things we hate but we still need to learn them. It is not true. I don't think there is anything that can't be taught in a fun way.











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