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Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

So frustrated I could just cry

Posted by on Oct. 21, 2013 at 4:22 PM
  • 17 Replies
I retired from teaching to homeschool my son who is 6. He attended public school kindergarten which had him stressed and if he had stayed in school he would have probably had a resource room placement in first grade due to his severe language delay. It's my first year so I'm feeling my way. I tried unschooling which to me didn't work well because after about a month of being interested in learning he didn't want to do anything. I feel a lot of stress to make progress with him because he does have special needs and I have lots of eyes on me from his specialists. I'm pretty relaxed and flexible, but I do have a schedule of work to get through. He does Reading Egss, Time4Learning, and written work. I work one on one with him, and we do arts and crafts. We also go on field trips and have park days with other hsers. First he wanted to go back to public school but now he doesn't want to do that. Now he doesn't want to do his work, cries and wails that it's too hard, wants to see what I'm doing with my 3 year old, wants to run around the house, sneaks away from any work if I'm not standing over him....you get the picture. My 3 year old is doing Reading Eggs and Math Seeds. Today while I worked with him, my 6 year old was supposed to be doing handwriting. Instead he poured a jar of Cajun spices all over the stovetop. He's still cleaning it off. I have a schedule of daily activities that he can manipulate as he finishes, I have scheduled breaks to run outside and play, and he gets to pick out of the treasure bag when he does his work. If he doesn't do his work during the day, he does it in the evening. Help.
by on Oct. 21, 2013 at 4:22 PM
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Replies (1-10):
usmom3
by BJ on Oct. 21, 2013 at 4:37 PM

 How much time are you expecting him to do school? At that age it should only be a few hours a day. Have you tried having a game day where you play educational board games once a week to break up the routine a bit? Maybe let him help set up the schedule for the day so he feels like he has some control in the matter. 

Bluecalm
by Bronze Member on Oct. 21, 2013 at 4:48 PM
He has 3 hours a day at the most, including the computer time, unless he gets interested in something and wants to do more. I like the games day idea. We do hands-on activities like science experiments and cooking and if he doesn't realize it's schoolwork he's all for it. I'll let him pick the order tomorrow and see if that helps.


Quoting usmom3:

 How much time are you expecting him to do school? At that age it should only be a few hours a day. Have you tried having a game day where you play educational board games once a week to break up the routine a bit? Maybe let him help set up the schedule for the day so he feels like he has some control in the matter. 


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BramblePatch
by on Oct. 21, 2013 at 5:00 PM
I have a 6 year old boy....and feel your pain!!! I try and keep his seatwork to 60 minutes, often mixing projects and read-alouds in between seatwork subjects. I always have coloring pages for him to do during the read-alouds. I actually found online learning the source of a lot of his attention issues and since eliminating it, things are much better around here :-)
Bluecalm
by Bronze Member on Oct. 21, 2013 at 5:06 PM
How did you decide the online work was the problem? Sometimes I feel like that's the only thing that is working.


Quoting BramblePatch:

I have a 6 year old boy....and feel your pain!!! I try and keep his seatwork to 60 minutes, often mixing projects and read-alouds in between seatwork subjects. I always have coloring pages for him to do during the read-alouds. I actually found online learning the source of a lot of his attention issues and since eliminating it, things are much better around here :-)

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usmom3
by BJ on Oct. 21, 2013 at 5:09 PM

 Mine don't like anything that looks like school ether. We do mostly educational games, educational TV, hands on projects & crafts.

Quoting Bluecalm:

He has 3 hours a day at the most, including the computer time, unless he gets interested in something and wants to do more. I like the games day idea. We do hands-on activities like science experiments and cooking and if he doesn't realize it's schoolwork he's all for it. I'll let him pick the order tomorrow and see if that helps.


Quoting usmom3:

 How much time are you expecting him to do school? At that age it should only be a few hours a day. Have you tried having a game day where you play educational board games once a week to break up the routine a bit? Maybe let him help set up the schedule for the day so he feels like he has some control in the matter. 


 

Bluecalm
by Bronze Member on Oct. 21, 2013 at 5:25 PM
I feel guilty if I'm not having him do some "real" work. It's all those years of teaching public school!


Quoting usmom3:

 Mine don't like anything that looks like school ether. We do mostly educational games, educational TV, hands on projects & crafts.


Quoting Bluecalm:

He has 3 hours a day at the most, including the computer time, unless he gets interested in something and wants to do more. I like the games day idea. We do hands-on activities like science experiments and cooking and if he doesn't realize it's schoolwork he's all for it. I'll let him pick the order tomorrow and see if that helps.



Quoting usmom3:


 How much time are you expecting him to do school? At that age it should only be a few hours a day. Have you tried having a game day where you play educational board games once a week to break up the routine a bit? Maybe let him help set up the schedule for the day so he feels like he has some control in the matter. 



 


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KrissyKC
by Silver Member on Oct. 21, 2013 at 6:39 PM
1 mom liked this

My 5 yr old daughter would have surely been categorized as ADHD with a major stress on the H part and maybe even ODD (she THRIVES on driving people batty and pretending to not understand or to argue!!!!)

I adore her, but all we can do is, "Ok, you don't want to obey and do your work, you may be excused, but no one else can play because we are doing school work."   She gets sent to her room.

Also, in our home, if you refuse to participate in school, you don't get to go play with friends or watch tv or video games until you "do school"... none of them want to do that on a Friday because if I don't offer school hours on Saturday, then they are grounded until Monday evening.


debramommyof4
by Silver Member on Oct. 21, 2013 at 6:50 PM

School time in my house lasts about 5 hours. To include pe, history and science, all three are our hands on fun classes that everyone gets to have fun with together.  But the rule in our house is if you do not finish your work which you have daily assignments of by Friday at 12pm then Saturday you will be doing school with Mommy while everyone else does Movie Night, park time, Jui-Jitsu and Game Night.  Those are our fun weekend activities.  Oh and there is no tv period all the rest of the days unless your work is done for the day. 

My kids are 3, 4, 6 and 7.  The 3 and 4 year old work maybe an hour a day.

maggiemom2000
by Member on Oct. 21, 2013 at 7:10 PM
1 mom liked this

Do more "real work" that looks like play. You can even do a lot of it together with your 3 yr old, just expecting different things from each of them. For example, workign with the magnetic letters the 3 yr old can be working on letter identification while the 6 yr old is working on words. You can also let the 6 yr old do the same stuff the 3 yr old is doing if he wants, in addition to his 6 yr old work. If he wants to redo some of the easy stuff, just let him!

Look at the ideas here:

Growing Readers

Are you Growing a Reader? Homeschooling your early reader? No need to buy an expensive curriculum to get your child off to a great start at reading. Do you want to avoid tedious, boring worksheets and instead learn through engaging hands on activities and play? Here are a collection of links on teaching your child to read and write for free:

Sight Words or Phonics? How about a balanced approach?


Read some background on using a balanced literacy approach to teach your child to read. What does your Kindergartner need to learn in reading? See the list of Common Core Kindergarten Standards and links to activities to teach those skills to your emergent reader.

What do I need to Buy?

The short answer: nothing. You can do all of the lessons and activities here using books from the library and things you already have around the house like paper, pens, chalk, and index cards. In this post I suggest some possible things you can buy to enhance the activities. These are supplies that you will be able to use for years, not just for a couple of lessons. Manipulatives like a good set of magnetic letters can be used from preschool into elementary school, beginning with basic letter identification, on to phonics, building sight words, word families and complex multisyllabic spelling words.


Shared Literature

Read, read, read to your child. Reading aloud to your child is the best thing you can do to grow a reader. Go beyond reading aloud and teach your child reading skills while enjoying great literature! (Preschool, Pre-K, Kindergarten)


Early Alphabet Learning and the Name Game

How to begin teaching the alphabet and other early literacy skills to your preschooler or Kindergartner. (Preschool, Pre-K, Kindergarten)

Kindergarten Sight Words and Early Reading Skills

What you need to know to get started teaching your Kindergartner to read including a look at some of the Common Core Standards for Kindergarten reading. (Kindergarten)

Kindergarten Sight Word Sentences

After you know about teaching sight words to your Kindergartner you are ready to move on to sentences. (Kindergarten)

Kindergarten Sight Words Reading Books

Once you start introducing your child to the sight words he is ready for his first emergent-reader book. (Kindergarten)


Beginning Phonics for Emergent Readers

Once your child knows most of the letters of the alphabet and their sounds he is ready to learn to "sound out" simple CVC words. This post shows you lots of hands on multi-sensory ways to practice early phonics. (Kindergarten, First Grade)


Learn 37 Words and Know how to Read and Write Over 500 Words!

Your child can learn more phonics "rules" by learning several words with common letter patterns. When your child learns to make analogies and manipulate onset and rime they can quickly read and write hundreds of new words. These are better known as word families. (Kindergarten, First Grade, Second Grade)
Molimomma
by Member on Oct. 21, 2013 at 7:13 PM
1 mom liked this

My son is not quite 4 but we've been "practicing" at preschool this year. I am a former teacher as well, K/1, so I understand how you feel pressure for him to get work done and do the kinds of things done at school. I started out like that in Aug and I am learning to be more flexible, relaxed and less worried about cranking out paperwork. I tried Reading Eggs but my son didn't like sitting at the computer that long. He does better with the iPad ap. I get the best response/engagement with homemade games or activities(centers) most of which I get from Teachers Pay Teachers. Also we start "school" by doing calendar every morning it seems to get him in a school frame of mind. After calendar we do 1 math activity, 1 handwriting activity, an poem or emergent reader and then 1 other science or craft activity plus whatever alphabet or phonics thing we are working on. I found the most success with a mixture of worksheets and learning games, plus iPad aps is the best recipe for us.Since he knows all his letters and most sounds but isn't quite ready for reading yet I count story time before bed as our reading time. Sometimes we do his learning games again in the afternoon but he gets to pick which ones we play or "revisit" unlike in the morning when I pick/plan what we do. Obviously, we don't do as much because he's too young but maybe this will give you some ideas.  Here is an example of 1 of his math games:

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