Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

What do you use?

I have been told about A Beka, Tapestry of Grace, Apologia, MathUSee... My head is spinning! We were loaned some books to get started. (I pulled her out of public school while she was in 6th, but she is doing 7th grade work) They are all A Beka. She doesn't have math yet, so we are doing MathUSee worksheets and finding other things that are grade appropriate for her. I want to know what you use and why you like it! And also some cons if you have them!

I am going to be homeschooling all 4 of my children. 12, 3 (almost 4), 2 and 5 months. So, I am going to have several grades going at once in a few years.

Thanks in advance ladies!




Lilypie Kids Birthday tickersLilypie Fourth Birthday tickersLilypie Third Birthday tickersLilypie First Birthday tickers
by on Oct. 23, 2013 at 11:35 AM
Replies (11-20):
No_Difference
by Silver Member on Oct. 23, 2013 at 5:11 PM
I use with my 4th grader: Math U See - love it because it is mastery based. We go stay on a chapter until she can teach it back to me (which may even be that same day the chapter is introduced) History Odyssey - I have a love hate relationship with this. I like that it isn't religious centered even with it for the first cycle through it uses Story of the World. I don't like that I can't pin point on what should be focused on for her age, and I have no way to assess if she is actually learning anything. I do like that I can pretty much save everything and use it again for my younger one, and most extra books I can check out at the library, so intial upfront cost is a lot, but subsequent years, not much of a cost. Real Science 4 Kids - again, love hate relationship. I love that the text is really easy and relateable to the kids, and there are labs with each chapter. I dislike that the "teachers manual" is an answer key to the labs, and most answers are "answers may vary." I also dislike I have to purchase multiple curriculums (for instance we're doing astronomy and geology each year, I had to buy each separate), to make one year of science. Again, upfront cost is there, but if I use it again with my little guy, I only need to buy the lab books. Also a plus, the majority of the lab equipment is pretty cheap or already found around the house. Write Shop - We're using the Jr, but there are other levels. We are loving this. It makes writing very hands on, which my kids are hands on learners. The younger level ones are even geared towards K, and most of it is working with the parent/teacher, and little to no writing on the child's part since they may not be able to. It gives suggestions for making it hard or easier, depending on the child's needs too. I'll only have to get a new "worksheets" which they call Fold N Go for my little guy which is not expenisve at all. (The time saver pack is totally worth getting though...I found that out the hard way....) Wordsmith Apprentice - just for more writing and grammar practice. This has been fun to use. It's an independent study book for the most part. On days we don't use Write Shop, we fill in with this instead. It has the child pretend they're writting for a newspaper, and all fo their writing assignments teach different grammar aspects all the while writing different articles for the newspaper, which would be the end result. All About Spelling - we LOVE this. Can be hands on. It is also mastery based. It teaches a bunch of different spelling ticks to help decode words when spelling, and the tricks can be applied to sounding out a tricky word while reading too. (I'm using this with my 4 year old too, and he is doing amazing with it.) Mosdos Press - I like it, but I'm also overwhelmed by it...the teacher's manuals are very detailed and give lots of extra information. Big upfront cost, but I'll only have to get a workbook if I use it again with my little guy (which I probably will). Their costumer service has also been amazing. My teachers manual was missing stories, and they offered to replace it for free. I didn't want a new copy since we worked through the stories, I just wanted to let them know in case there was a mass printing issue... Handwriting Without Tears - It's pretty inexpensive. I liked that the teachers manuals gave tips on proper pencil grip, which helped my little guy tremendously, but I could've just as easily printed out free worksheets online for this since we definitely don't follow everything in the book... For my 4 year old I'm also using All About Reading. He has done amazing with this program, and he actually enjoys doing it for the most part, but I also use this in conjuction with Star Fall. We don't follow the Star Fall program (which we just use the free stuff), but we do it out of order to fit wtih AAR. It has worked really well and when he's getting bored doing the same things in AAR to break up the routine a little. Most other things with him, we do in play. I made a morning book with him where we track which day it is, how many days we're in school (then he adds up those numbers...today is our 42 day of school so he added 4+2), we track day of the week, and month, and weather. We also learn how to say the day of the week, the month, and what day it is in Mandarin, and the weather.
NYCitymomx3
by Bronze Member on Oct. 23, 2013 at 5:27 PM

I'm only homeschooling one child this year:  12y/o ds in 7th grade.

This year we are using Lightning Literature 7 which has some good books, comprehension questions, vocabulary, and lots of writing excercises.  

For math we love Saxon.  Ds is just about finished with 7/6 and we're starting Algebra 1/2 in the next 2 weeks.  It's a great, effective, thorough spiral program.  The explanations are perfect for ds and there are lots of practice problems.

For Science we use Apologia General Science.  I like the way the book reads and we find the experiments really awesome.  I got the full lab kit with it.  

For History we like K12 Human Odyssey 1.  It's a nice read with nice pictures.  Ds likes it.  We just zip through it, a chapter at a time.  Ds jots down important events, people, and dates and we keep a timeline book of centuries (ala Charlotte Mason).

For Geography we use World Physical Geography by Runkle.  This is another quick read and we do this once a week.  We plan on stretching this into next year, too.

We're also Catholic, but a Protestant book doesn't bother me if I feel the info is worth it.  I mean, it's not going to change our views.  I have researched extensively for a science program to use in the upper grades and in my opinion there is nothing else that comes close to Apologia's thoroughness and lab work for the price.  And besides, any religious views in the book (which I still haven't really come across) are easily skipped over.  

There are a ton of great programs as well as full all-in-one curriculums out there.  Good luck with your search, and remember, nothing is ever set in stone.  You can change any time you want.  Your child's needs are not like anyone else's.

summerbear
by Member on Oct. 23, 2013 at 10:47 PM

Wow!! So much info and some really great sites to look up! I really appreciate all the time you took to help me out!!  Thank you!

Quoting No_Difference:

I use with my 4th grader: Math U See - love it because it is mastery based. We go stay on a chapter until she can teach it back to me (which may even be that same day the chapter is introduced) History Odyssey - I have a love hate relationship with this. I like that it isn't religious centered even with it for the first cycle through it uses Story of the World. I don't like that I can't pin point on what should be focused on for her age, and I have no way to assess if she is actually learning anything. I do like that I can pretty much save everything and use it again for my younger one, and most extra books I can check out at the library, so intial upfront cost is a lot, but subsequent years, not much of a cost. Real Science 4 Kids - again, love hate relationship. I love that the text is really easy and relateable to the kids, and there are labs with each chapter. I dislike that the "teachers manual" is an answer key to the labs, and most answers are "answers may vary." I also dislike I have to purchase multiple curriculums (for instance we're doing astronomy and geology each year, I had to buy each separate), to make one year of science. Again, upfront cost is there, but if I use it again with my little guy, I only need to buy the lab books. Also a plus, the majority of the lab equipment is pretty cheap or already found around the house. Write Shop - We're using the Jr, but there are other levels. We are loving this. It makes writing very hands on, which my kids are hands on learners. The younger level ones are even geared towards K, and most of it is working with the parent/teacher, and little to no writing on the child's part since they may not be able to. It gives suggestions for making it hard or easier, depending on the child's needs too. I'll only have to get a new "worksheets" which they call Fold N Go for my little guy which is not expenisve at all. (The time saver pack is totally worth getting though...I found that out the hard way....) Wordsmith Apprentice - just for more writing and grammar practice. This has been fun to use. It's an independent study book for the most part. On days we don't use Write Shop, we fill in with this instead. It has the child pretend they're writting for a newspaper, and all fo their writing assignments teach different grammar aspects all the while writing different articles for the newspaper, which would be the end result. All About Spelling - we LOVE this. Can be hands on. It is also mastery based. It teaches a bunch of different spelling ticks to help decode words when spelling, and the tricks can be applied to sounding out a tricky word while reading too. (I'm using this with my 4 year old too, and he is doing amazing with it.) Mosdos Press - I like it, but I'm also overwhelmed by it...the teacher's manuals are very detailed and give lots of extra information. Big upfront cost, but I'll only have to get a workbook if I use it again with my little guy (which I probably will). Their costumer service has also been amazing. My teachers manual was missing stories, and they offered to replace it for free. I didn't want a new copy since we worked through the stories, I just wanted to let them know in case there was a mass printing issue... Handwriting Without Tears - It's pretty inexpensive. I liked that the teachers manuals gave tips on proper pencil grip, which helped my little guy tremendously, but I could've just as easily printed out free worksheets online for this since we definitely don't follow everything in the book... For my 4 year old I'm also using All About Reading. He has done amazing with this program, and he actually enjoys doing it for the most part, but I also use this in conjuction with Star Fall. We don't follow the Star Fall program (which we just use the free stuff), but we do it out of order to fit wtih AAR. It has worked really well and when he's getting bored doing the same things in AAR to break up the routine a little. Most other things with him, we do in play. I made a morning book with him where we track which day it is, how many days we're in school (then he adds up those numbers...today is our 42 day of school so he added 4+2), we track day of the week, and month, and weather. We also learn how to say the day of the week, the month, and what day it is in Mandarin, and the weather.


summerbear
by Member on Oct. 23, 2013 at 10:49 PM
Quoting NYCitymomx3:

I'm only homeschooling one child this year:  12y/o ds in 7th grade.

This year we are using Lightning Literature 7 which has some good books, comprehension questions, vocabulary, and lots of writing excercises.  

For math we love Saxon.  Ds is just about finished with 7/6 and we're starting Algebra 1/2 in the next 2 weeks.  It's a great, effective, thorough spiral program.  The explanations are perfect for ds and there are lots of practice problems.

For Science we use Apologia General Science.  I like the way the book reads and we find the experiments really awesome.  I got the full lab kit with it.  

For History we like K12 Human Odyssey 1.  It's a nice read with nice pictures.  Ds likes it.  We just zip through it, a chapter at a time.  Ds jots down important events, people, and dates and we keep a timeline book of centuries (ala Charlotte Mason).

For Geography we use World Physical Geography by Runkle.  This is another quick read and we do this once a week.  We plan on stretching this into next year, too.

We're also Catholic, but a Protestant book doesn't bother me if I feel the info is worth it.  I mean, it's not going to change our views.  I have researched extensively for a science program to use in the upper grades and in my opinion there is nothing else that comes close to Apologia's thoroughness and lab work for the price.  And besides, any religious views in the book (which I still haven't really come across) are easily skipped over.  

There are a ton of great programs as well as full all-in-one curriculums out there.  Good luck with your search, and remember, nothing is ever set in stone.  You can change any time you want.  Your child's needs are not like anyone else's.

I love how many options there are for parents who homeschool, and the flexibility! Thank you for the titles, I love researching!

summerbear
by Member on Oct. 23, 2013 at 10:51 PM

Thank you so much! I love how I can use these for my younger ones too! <3

Quoting maggiemom2000:

Some of my favorites:

khan academy https://www.khanacademy.org

http://www.time4learning.com

http://www.teachingtextbooks.com

http://www.movingbeyondthepage.com


KrissyKC
by Silver Member on Oct. 23, 2013 at 11:12 PM
1 mom liked this

Math:

I like Math U See, but if you are only doing some worksheets from it, then you are only getting the practice.   My kids watch a short video, then go do the worksheets until they understand it, then they assess to see if they get it... then watch the next video.   It's terrific because it's a very painless process and it's that one subject I'm pretty hands off on (for my older kids)...     we tried Saxon, but it takes so much effort to teach and to get them to DO it...  it didn't work for us.  However, my older daughter really needs to consider some Saxon in high school because she wants to get into a math/science field.  

Science:   My kids are DEVOURING Apologia.   They are really digging into the Anatomy book we are using.  My kindergartener is very ADHD/ODD.   She is even picking up a little of it just by sitting in on it with her siblings and having the Junior Journal Notebook to go with it.   If I had known science would be this much fun, we would have started Apologia three years ago.

History:   Well, this year we wanted to hit on American History with the two older ones.  ((11 and 9)) because we have done geography and some ancient history.   So, we looked at Rod & Staff and found that their 5th grade history is about North American history.   We are enjoying it so far.  The last few times I had the kids "put it away" to get out the next subject, they groaned because they wanted to keep doing history.  I only do it in small bites and we do some crafting to go with it.   Making a diorama (3D picture in a shoe box) this next week of different native tribes.

Language Arts:   We use a few fun things, like bananagrams, scrabble, finish lines (finish the story stuff), reading with skits and plays, madlibs, story cards, journaling, writing to friends,.... etc.    

English/Grammar:    My current primary english curriculum, though, is Rod & Staff.  It's just so simple and to the point about teaching English (diagramming and memorizing and really LEARNING the concepts)...  However, after three years and being VERY happy with it, we decided to take a break and switch to a literature unit.   If we feel we need it we will return to Rod & Staff later.  I found some actual Middle School text books and teacher at a cheap sale and picked them up.  I later found some supplemental work on Amazon.   I can't wait to start this after January.   We will still hit and miss our Rod & Staff until this year is done.    

Bible:   Currently, .there is so much bible in their curriculum and they attend church twice a week plus participate in Junior Bible Quizzing, that we don't really teach it except quiet time which the kids usually read their bibles a bit.  Sometimes, we pick up a study, or work on a unit they do in church or just read together... The last two years we taught out of the Gospels and James.

I have a ton of other extra stuff for when we need to change things up.   Like, I have several small math booklets, today we did a page on problem solving and worked on magic squares.  (all the numbers have to equal the same in each row, column, and diagnol)... then, we did some pre-algebra warm ups (neither kid is in pre-algebra yet, but it's a challenge thing.)... then we discussed analogies and did 10 minutes of analogies.

I really like the curriculum, but I cannot by any means finish it all.   I also can't seem to stick with a plan.  We take what we have in front of us and kinda stir it all up and see what pops out.   Some of it is led by me, some of it is at the request of the kids.







KrissyKC
by Silver Member on Oct. 23, 2013 at 11:17 PM

If I were in your shoes, I'd strive to get the 12 year old "set up" and let the littles join on subjects that interest them.  

For example, say you decide to cover astronomy with 12 yr old... the 4 yr old can trace the names of the planets, the 2 yr old can trace circles (to her ability), and then they can listen in at the table with some playdoh making planets, stars, suns!   Later at night, you can have some picture books that teach the same topics as the curriculum and you can all enjoy them.   The 12 yr old can practice reading aloud to the little ones.   Give her vocabulary and spelling words that are "space themed" and have her write a letter to nasa.   If you have a little money to throw into it, you can order some dehydrated space food to try.   Find some terrific websites about astronomy and let your 12 yr old explore them (with parent controls or supervision)..

Have some English and Math on grade level and be reading a historical novel.  Research some of the stuff going on during this time period.

voila, you are homeschooling them all.




No_Difference
by Silver Member on Oct. 24, 2013 at 8:46 AM

 No problem. I just wish it kept the stinking formatting originally so it was easier for you to read! lol

Quoting summerbear:

Wow!! So much info and some really great sites to look up! I really appreciate all the time you took to help me out!!  Thank you!

Quoting No_Difference:

I use with my 4th grader:
Math U See - love it because it is mastery based. We go stay on a chapter until she can teach it back to me (which may even be that same day the chapter is introduced)

History Odyssey - I have a love hate relationship with this. I like that it isn't religious centered even with it for the first cycle through it uses Story of the World. I don't like that I can't pin point on what should be focused on for her age, and I have no way to assess if she is actually learning anything. I do like that I can pretty much save everything and use it again for my younger one, and most extra books I can check out at the library, so intial upfront cost is a lot, but subsequent years, not much of a cost.

Real Science 4 Kids - again, love hate relationship. I love that the text is really easy and relateable to the kids, and there are labs with each chapter. I dislike that the "teachers manual" is an answer key to the labs, and most answers are "answers may vary." I also dislike I have to purchase multiple curriculums (for instance we're doing astronomy and geology each year, I had to buy each separate), to make one year of science. Again, upfront cost is there, but if I use it again with my little guy, I only need to buy the lab books. Also a plus, the majority of the lab equipment is pretty cheap or already found around the house.

Write Shop - We're using the Jr, but there are other levels. We are loving this. It makes writing very hands on, which my kids are hands on learners. The younger level ones are even geared towards K, and most of it is working with the parent/teacher, and little to no writing on the child's part since they may not be able to. It gives suggestions for making it hard or easier, depending on the child's needs too. I'll only have to get a new "worksheets" which they call Fold N Go for my little guy which is not expenisve at all. (The time saver pack is totally worth getting though...I found that out the hard way....)

Wordsmith Apprentice - just for more writing and grammar practice. This has been fun to use. It's an independent study book for the most part. On days we don't use Write Shop, we fill in with this instead. It has the child pretend they're writting for a newspaper, and all fo their writing assignments teach different grammar aspects all the while writing different articles for the newspaper, which would be the end result.

All About Spelling - we LOVE this. Can be hands on. It is also mastery based. It teaches a bunch of different spelling ticks to help decode words when spelling, and the tricks can be applied to sounding out a tricky word while reading too. (I'm using this with my 4 year old too, and he is doing amazing with it.)

Mosdos Press - I like it, but I'm also overwhelmed by it...the teacher's manuals are very detailed and give lots of extra information. Big upfront cost, but I'll only have to get a workbook if I use it again with my little guy (which I probably will). Their costumer service has also been amazing. My teachers manual was missing stories, and they offered to replace it for free. I didn't want a new copy since we worked through the stories, I just wanted to let them know in case there was a mass printing issue...

Handwriting Without Tears - It's pretty inexpensive. I liked that the teachers manuals gave tips on proper pencil grip, which helped my little guy tremendously, but I could've just as easily printed out free worksheets online for this since we definitely don't follow everything in the book...

For my 4 year old I'm also using All About Reading. He has done amazing with this program, and he actually enjoys doing it for the most part, but I also use this in conjuction with Star Fall. We don't follow the Star Fall program (which we just use the free stuff), but we do it out of order to fit wtih AAR. It has worked really well and when he's getting bored doing the same things in AAR to break up the routine a little. Most other things with him, we do in play. I made a morning book with him where we track which day it is, how many days we're in school (then he adds up those numbers...today is our 42 day of school so he added 4+2), we track day of the week, and month, and weather. We also learn how to say the day of the week, the month, and what day it is in Mandarin, and the weather.


 

AlternaTickers - Cool, free Web tickers

AlternaTickers - Cool, free Web tickers
Leissaintexas
by Bronze Member on Oct. 24, 2013 at 9:30 AM
My favorite thing this year has been Notgrass american history. We are using BJU for science and math.
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

close Join now to connect to
other members!
Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN