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Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

Help me think this through before I present it to our co-op leaders.

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Hypothetically, you were offered the ability to partially enroll your children in a private school for gifted and/or dyslexic children. You could enroll in any of the following subjects (as many or as few as you want): literature/english, OG tutoring, history, science, mathematics, woodshop/3D art, art, music.

You all know about the wonderful school my daughter attends. He wants to reach out to homeschoolers. The school targets children who are both gifted and dyslexic, or just gifted. Other learning disablities are considered - like ADD/ADHD, but not children who have autism or spectrum disorders solely (that isn't what they have the resources for).

I'm going to reach out to the heads/owners of the Catholic co-ops I belong to. The Headmaster had a less than great encounter when he presented this to a protestant group, who appeared to take offense to that he didn't teach young earth creation and that the history is secular. The school is secular, although the Headmaster is conservative and very inclusive/respectful of all faiths. We've yet to run into any issues as Catholics.

What would entice you to take part in this? I'm going to meet with him again to get a price break down (right now tuition is yearly, and he would need to figure out a price breakdown by class/semester/month for this), and because I see some logistical issues (like running your child out daily for one or two supplemental classes) - but I think those could be resolved.

So if this were offered to you, what are some things you would want to see or know? Questions you would ask at a parent session?

ETA: the "homeschool extension" students would have access to the same interscholastic opportunities, camp outs, hiking trips, field trips, etc that the full time students have access to.

I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















by on Oct. 26, 2013 at 1:10 PM
Replies (11-20):
AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Oct. 26, 2013 at 2:47 PM

Well, the focus is both gifted AND learning disabled. A gifted child without a learning disability would function fine in the content subjects, because those are more geared to gifted children without the struggle incurred by dyslexic children in skill subjects (like ELA and mathematics) - the gifted dyslexic children receive support in their assignments for content subjects with their at-school-tutors.

I'm not sure what makes the instruction so different for gifted children. I know that content is usually taught in a multisensory way, expectations are high for quality of work and quality is emphasized over quantity. My lack of answer to that question is relevant - as homeschoolers we always taught to our child's level and naturally differntiated the content for our 2E child/ren, so - not having had a child in an average brick and mortar classroom for so many years, that's a great question for someone to ask the Headmaster, lol. I'll put it on my list!


Quoting PurpleCupcake:

Since the focus is gifted children I would want to know what would be so different from teaching average children. 

Teaching gifted children is very different than average children. 



I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















PurpleCupcake
by Cynthia on Oct. 26, 2013 at 2:55 PM
1 mom liked this

The reason I ask is that I was gifted as a child and the public schools I went to could not handle it. They were constantly making modifications, changes, creating new classes, testing, testing, testing...it was extremely frustrating!

And then whatever they did always had a slow pacing problem...which bored me to tears

I know being gifted sounds like a gift...but it can be much more of a curse in a public school setting. 

I guess if it were for my kid....I would want to know what else they do besides working from a textbook....What extras are there?

Quoting AutymsMommy:

Well, the focus is both gifted AND learning disabled. A gifted child without a learning disability would function fine in the content subjects, because those are more geared to gifted children without the struggle incurred by dyslexic children in skill subjects (like ELA and mathematics) - the gifted dyslexic children receive support in their assignments for content subjects with their at-school-tutors.

I'm not sure what makes the instruction so different for gifted children. I know that content is usually taught in a multisensory way, expectations are high for quality of work and quality is emphasized over quantity. My lack of answer to that question is relevant - as homeschoolers we always taught to our child's level and naturally differntiated the content for our 2E child/ren, so - not having had a child in an average brick and mortar classroom for so many years, that's a great question for someone to ask the Headmaster, lol. I'll put it on my list!


Quoting PurpleCupcake:

Since the focus is gifted children I would want to know what would be so different from teaching average children. 

Teaching gifted children is very different than average children. 




kirbymom
by Sonja on Oct. 26, 2013 at 2:56 PM
I thought that too but another concern comes to mind...what would be the point to go to a class if you just do it at home?


Quoting AutymsMommy:

Mine as well. Logistical nightmare.

But, as new material isn't presented every day in the content subjects, and some days are more "documentary, research, vocab, writing about what has been learned", I think those logistics could be worked out.


Quoting kirbymom:This would be my same concern.


Quoting bluerooffarm:

 That sounds like an awesome opportunity.  What is OG tutoring?  Would the classes be daily or are they block scheduled on an AB type schedule?  Our co-op is done on a weekly basis, so I'd rather not make a commitment to get my kids somewhere every single day, but if the classes were offered M-W-F or T-Th then I would consider enrolling for a class or two.





AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Oct. 26, 2013 at 3:08 PM


Actually, there aren't textbooks (but for math). Assignments are tailored to each child. First grading period of the year was spent getting to know each child - their strengths, weaknesses, interests, and skill levels, to make that more do-able.

Quoting PurpleCupcake:

The reason I ask is that I was gifted as a child and the public schools I went to could not handle it. They were constantly making modifications, changes, creating new classes, testing, testing, testing...it was extremely frustrating!

And then whatever they did always had a slow pacing problem...which bored me to tears

I know being gifted sounds like a gift...but it can be much more of a curse in a public school setting. 

I guess if it were for my kid....I would want to know what else they do besides working from a textbook....What extras are there?

Quoting AutymsMommy:

Well, the focus is both gifted AND learning disabled. A gifted child without a learning disability would function fine in the content subjects, because those are more geared to gifted children without the struggle incurred by dyslexic children in skill subjects (like ELA and mathematics) - the gifted dyslexic children receive support in their assignments for content subjects with their at-school-tutors.

I'm not sure what makes the instruction so different for gifted children. I know that content is usually taught in a multisensory way, expectations are high for quality of work and quality is emphasized over quantity. My lack of answer to that question is relevant - as homeschoolers we always taught to our child's level and naturally differntiated the content for our 2E child/ren, so - not having had a child in an average brick and mortar classroom for so many years, that's a great question for someone to ask the Headmaster, lol. I'll put it on my list!


Quoting PurpleCupcake:

Since the focus is gifted children I would want to know what would be so different from teaching average children. 

Teaching gifted children is very different than average children. 






I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Oct. 26, 2013 at 3:10 PM

No, I mean do the extensions at home. As in, maybe Mon and Wed class is presented in formal direct instruction - the other days are homework days to be done at home... the vocab assignments, work on the writing assignments, etc.


Quoting kirbymom:

I thought that too but another concern comes to mind...what would be the point to go to a class if you just do it at home?


Quoting AutymsMommy:

Mine as well. Logistical nightmare.

But, as new material isn't presented every day in the content subjects, and some days are more "documentary, research, vocab, writing about what has been learned", I think those logistics could be worked out.



Quoting kirbymom:This would be my same concern.


Quoting bluerooffarm:

 That sounds like an awesome opportunity.  What is OG tutoring?  Would the classes be daily or are they block scheduled on an AB type schedule?  Our co-op is done on a weekly basis, so I'd rather not make a commitment to get my kids somewhere every single day, but if the classes were offered M-W-F or T-Th then I would consider enrolling for a class or two.









I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















kirbymom
by Sonja on Oct. 26, 2013 at 3:31 PM
Oh snits. I knew that. lol Can you say brain fudge?! I don't know what I was actually thinking. I guess I wasn't. lol

So sorry about that.

Quoting AutymsMommy:

No, I mean do the extensions at home. As in, maybe Mon and Wed class is presented in formal direct instruction - the other days are homework days to be done at home... the vocab assignments, work on the writing assignments, etc.


Quoting kirbymom:I thought that too but another concern comes to mind...what would be the point to go to a class if you just do it at home?


Quoting AutymsMommy:

Mine as well. Logistical nightmare.

But, as new material isn't presented every day in the content subjects, and some days are more "documentary, research, vocab, writing about what has been learned", I think those logistics could be worked out.


Quoting kirbymom:This would be my same concern.


Quoting bluerooffarm:

 That sounds like an awesome opportunity.  What is OG tutoring?  Would the classes be daily or are they block scheduled on an AB type schedule?  Our co-op is done on a weekly basis, so I'd rather not make a commitment to get my kids somewhere every single day, but if the classes were offered M-W-F or T-Th then I would consider enrolling for a class or two.








KrissyKC
by Silver Member on Oct. 26, 2013 at 4:00 PM

If I could pick and choose?

One, they should avoid the topics of evolution/creation in their other classes.   Like don't have them write a paper on the Mesozoic (spelling?) Era for a creative writing course.   

It should be explained that the school itself isn't being run as a "religious institution" and parents need to be aware of that when enrolling their kids.   Maybe have a waiver that they sign???

I would offer certain topics... like I would offer several writing/grammar courses, some electives like art/pe/music... and some of the upper maths and sciences.  

AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Oct. 26, 2013 at 5:05 PM

Well, the handbook explains that it is a secular school. Now, as such, they aren't going to skirt the evolution topics if they come up, and aren't going to alter their educational philosophies to gain students, and the school runs streamlined - so what they're learning about in history and science, is integrated into their other courses (such as writing topics), but the structure of the school is explained upon enrollment, so parents would definitely be aware before enrolling their students. The school vets students as much as the parents vet the school, lol.


They can only offer what they have available to full time students. I think he only wants to offer content subjects, like history, science, art, music, and woodshop, because the skill subject that you mention (math and ELA) are skill based, not grade based, because most of the children struggle in language arts - so no specific creative writing courses available; children who are solely gifted and not dyslexic are given those assignments on an individual basis and with individual instruction/critique.


The school only goes through grade 8.

Quoting KrissyKC:

If I could pick and choose?

One, they should avoid the topics of evolution/creation in their other classes.   Like don't have them write a paper on the Mesozoic (spelling?) Era for a creative writing course.   

It should be explained that the school itself isn't being run as a "religious institution" and parents need to be aware of that when enrolling their kids.   Maybe have a waiver that they sign???

I would offer certain topics... like I would offer several writing/grammar courses, some electives like art/pe/music... and some of the upper maths and sciences.  



I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















PurpleCupcake
by Cynthia on Oct. 26, 2013 at 9:17 PM

ok wow...that's awesome!

I would talk about what you just said...parents would love that. 

Quoting AutymsMommy:


Actually, there aren't textbooks (but for math). Assignments are tailored to each child. First grading period of the year was spent getting to know each child - their strengths, weaknesses, interests, and skill levels, to make that more do-able.

Quoting PurpleCupcake:

The reason I ask is that I was gifted as a child and the public schools I went to could not handle it. They were constantly making modifications, changes, creating new classes, testing, testing, testing...it was extremely frustrating!

And then whatever they did always had a slow pacing problem...which bored me to tears

I know being gifted sounds like a gift...but it can be much more of a curse in a public school setting. 

I guess if it were for my kid....I would want to know what else they do besides working from a textbook....What extras are there?

Quoting AutymsMommy:

Well, the focus is both gifted AND learning disabled. A gifted child without a learning disability would function fine in the content subjects, because those are more geared to gifted children without the struggle incurred by dyslexic children in skill subjects (like ELA and mathematics) - the gifted dyslexic children receive support in their assignments for content subjects with their at-school-tutors.

I'm not sure what makes the instruction so different for gifted children. I know that content is usually taught in a multisensory way, expectations are high for quality of work and quality is emphasized over quantity. My lack of answer to that question is relevant - as homeschoolers we always taught to our child's level and naturally differntiated the content for our 2E child/ren, so - not having had a child in an average brick and mortar classroom for so many years, that's a great question for someone to ask the Headmaster, lol. I'll put it on my list!


Quoting PurpleCupcake:

Since the focus is gifted children I would want to know what would be so different from teaching average children. 

Teaching gifted children is very different than average children. 












AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Oct. 26, 2013 at 9:36 PM

It really IS pretty awesome. They bring in an actual musician for music - he comes with his awesome husky pup and teaches REAL music. The science teacher is a scientist, not a random guy with a degree in science education. The headmaster and several of his staff are what they teach - gifted dyslexics themselves.

Sorry. I got off track. It's an amazing school.

Not for anyone with a dog allergy. They have a pooch in the office and another, very large, fluffy dog (the school mascot) roaming the grounds and attending classes with the kids - he's a breed known for being good therapy.. forget the breed name though...

but I digress. I have a ton of great things to say to the co-ops... I'm just not sure they want to hear it. Some are militantly anti any brick and mortar school.


Quoting PurpleCupcake:

ok wow...that's awesome!

I would talk about what you just said...parents would love that. 

Quoting AutymsMommy:


Actually, there aren't textbooks (but for math). Assignments are tailored to each child. First grading period of the year was spent getting to know each child - their strengths, weaknesses, interests, and skill levels, to make that more do-able.

Quoting PurpleCupcake:

The reason I ask is that I was gifted as a child and the public schools I went to could not handle it. They were constantly making modifications, changes, creating new classes, testing, testing, testing...it was extremely frustrating!

And then whatever they did always had a slow pacing problem...which bored me to tears

I know being gifted sounds like a gift...but it can be much more of a curse in a public school setting. 

I guess if it were for my kid....I would want to know what else they do besides working from a textbook....What extras are there?

Quoting AutymsMommy:

Well, the focus is both gifted AND learning disabled. A gifted child without a learning disability would function fine in the content subjects, because those are more geared to gifted children without the struggle incurred by dyslexic children in skill subjects (like ELA and mathematics) - the gifted dyslexic children receive support in their assignments for content subjects with their at-school-tutors.

I'm not sure what makes the instruction so different for gifted children. I know that content is usually taught in a multisensory way, expectations are high for quality of work and quality is emphasized over quantity. My lack of answer to that question is relevant - as homeschoolers we always taught to our child's level and naturally differntiated the content for our 2E child/ren, so - not having had a child in an average brick and mortar classroom for so many years, that's a great question for someone to ask the Headmaster, lol. I'll put it on my list!


Quoting PurpleCupcake:

Since the focus is gifted children I would want to know what would be so different from teaching average children. 

Teaching gifted children is very different than average children. 









I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















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