Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

May possibly buy a mini farm next year and would love some advice.

Posted by   + Show Post

This isn't exactly an hs question, but I know quite a few of you ladies have farms, and those do have direct hs benefits.  :)

We're currently wrapping up the last of the updates to our home.  We've been talking for years about moving where we would have five or more acres, and it seems like a much better & easier option now that both of our daughters are homeschooled.  It would be so nice to have a huge garden, our own animals, and participate in 4H.

Sorry this is so broad a question, but what should we think of?  We'd love to have two or more wool-bearing animals (we've been 'spinning' our own yarn with a drop spindle).  Initially we were thinking of sheep but llamas are incredibly soft and seem brighter too. 

Can chickens be kept in a coop with a big fenced yard area?  My SIL's are loose, but I'd like to keep the areas by the trampoline & play set clean.  Do you have to have a rooster?

Thank you for pointing me in the right direction!

by on Oct. 28, 2013 at 8:38 PM
Replies (41-45):
bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Oct. 30, 2013 at 9:31 PM
1 mom liked this

 Really, I'm not sure.  We usually do about 10-15 chickens and a goat or 2 all at once and just make a day of the process.  Maybe 15 minutes to a half an hour?  But that's just a guess.

Quoting TidewaterClan:

Thanks - that's something to look forward to!   How long does it take (roughly) to do the plucking?

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 :-) Exactly!  LOL

As for the chickens, we had done grouse and wild turkey before.  If you make the cut right and stick your hand up into the cavity far enough to reach the top Y of the lungs, you can pull nearly everything out at once.  We did not do well the first few times, but by now I've gotten pretty good at it.  Then you can either skin them (they dry out when you cook them a bit) or you can douse them for about 30 seconds into a BIG pot of boiling water and rip all the feathers out.  It can get pretty...um....macabre. But if you get the whole family involved it can go well.

 

TidewaterClan
by on Oct. 30, 2013 at 9:37 PM

Thanks so much for that info!  That's just the kind of thing we need to add to start our research.

Quoting Boobah:

When I went to an alpaca farm earlier this month, she said that the llamas aren't really fiber animals because their fur is much more coarse than sheep or alpacas. They do use a llama as protection for their alpacas though. Like a guard dog, kind of.


TidewaterClan
by on Oct. 30, 2013 at 9:42 PM
1 mom liked this

That's a good idea to do a bunch at once.  I'm sure practice makes faster too.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 Really, I'm not sure.  We usually do about 10-15 chickens and a goat or 2 all at once and just make a day of the process.  Maybe 15 minutes to a half an hour?  But that's just a guess.

Quoting TidewaterClan:

Thanks - that's something to look forward to!   How long does it take (roughly) to do the plucking?

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 :-) Exactly!  LOL

As for the chickens, we had done grouse and wild turkey before.  If you make the cut right and stick your hand up into the cavity far enough to reach the top Y of the lungs, you can pull nearly everything out at once.  We did not do well the first few times, but by now I've gotten pretty good at it.  Then you can either skin them (they dry out when you cook them a bit) or you can douse them for about 30 seconds into a BIG pot of boiling water and rip all the feathers out.  It can get pretty...um....macabre. But if you get the whole family involved it can go well.

 


kirbymom
by Sonja on Nov. 2, 2013 at 9:41 AM
1 mom liked this
Lol ~ you succeeded. Very none gruesome.

Better we call them to us than us chasing them all over the place! lol

Quoting TidewaterClan:

That sounds sweet calling them to you.

I've never had the pleasure of watching a live plucking.  : |  Sure looking forward to that part.  Cleaning the rabbits isn't too bad since the (keeping this non-gruesome I hope!) outer layer is one-stop shopping so to speak.

Quoting kirbymom:Your welcome. :)
Yeah, when you trim back their beaks and their shanks, it seems to make them more calm. Kind of like neutering a dog or cat.
After doing that, we also crooed to them whenever we would feed them. The chickens seemed to like it and would respond quicker and even come when we called to check them out. It sure was a little easier to catch the ones we were raising for meat at the table. Have you ever seen a chucken plucked? Oh my but that sure is an experience! lol


Koltie6
by on Nov. 3, 2013 at 7:53 AM
1 mom liked this
We live on 5 acres in Texas. We have cows for beef, chickens for eggs , hogs and a large garden. We are learning as we go . My 13 year old wants to try beekeeping. We have been involved in 4h for 13 years. It has been great. Good luck.
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

close Join now to connect to
other members!
Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN