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Okay moms with unmedicated ADHD kids....

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 What curricula have you found that work well with your little wigglers?  And What curricula would you avoid like the plague?

I will not get my youngest diagnosed because I do not want to hear about medications.  He is who he is and we will take it as it comes.  That said, I know he'll always need to move more, use his whole body in his learning, and move from activity to activity a bit more often.  I still plan on slowly increasing his attention span (for some reason my hubby was concerned that not getting a diagnoses and not getting medication meant that I wasn't going to address his issues at all.)

We treat with: proper sleep schedules, proper nutrition, and exercise. 

by on Oct. 29, 2013 at 9:03 AM
Replies (21-30):
bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Oct. 29, 2013 at 12:15 PM

 

Quoting paganbaby:

Sadly I medicated my dd when she was young so I don't have a whole lot of advice.

 That's okay....thanks for the bump!  :-)

Oh and sorry to hear that it was "sadly" done.

Rosyletters1
by on Oct. 29, 2013 at 12:48 PM
No, that wasn't said as nicely as possible.
Get over it. Have you never went off topic a little? Sheesh


Quoting bluerooffarm:

 I'm going to say this as nicely as possible....That's great for you.  I'm glad you found what works for your family.  This post is specifically for curriculum that does and does not work well for an unmedicated child.  It was right there in the title "unmedicated"  I could not be more clear.  If you wish to have a discussion about medicating an ADHD child, please, make a post about it.  I do not want to discuss it and I definately do not want to end up slogging through lots and lots of posts in my thread about medications and their wonder stories.  Thank you.


Quoting QueenCreole313:


Please don't think I am trying to incite a riot of words, but I just want everyone to know that it's not wrong to use medications properly. It is wrong to over-medicate. 


I finally put my son on medications. He's 10. Honestly, it was his decision. I knew he was ADHD for years. He's always done well with his school work. It took him more time. So, I allowed for less structured work, more time to complete the work and more breaks to decompress. But, we got to a point where he was not able to concentrate despite knowing how to do the work. He would try to hard he would hyper-focus which gave him headaches and stomach aches. 


We finally received a formal evaluation, which was eye-opening because it allowed me to learn more of exactly how his brain processes information. Then, we met with a fabulous specialist who did not judge our homeschooling or my concerns with medications. I was against it because I saw so many children who were little zombies without personality staring into space. 


We started him on the lowest dose and it was amazing. The boy is back! Work that used to take an hour now takes 20 minutes. I'm not saying it will be this way for everyone. Just wanted to share. 


 


hwblyf
by Silver Member on Oct. 29, 2013 at 12:55 PM


It's funny, the acting it out is all him.  There's very little about him that's been receptive to influences, though, so all his behaviors are all him.  :)  So much has been trial and error.  I've wanted so bad to give him fiddle things (stress balls and whatnot), but those don't appeal to him.  I have motion sensitivities (it can make my head hurt and make me need to vomit if I am having eye/motion issues), so sometimes his constant motion isn't appreciated!  He also needs the space to be himself.  He has sensory issues, so there is a lot to life he can't do that seem harmless.  Those darn bouncy houses that everyone thinks is such a treat for kids?  He can't behave himself near those to save his life.  Overstimulation is always bad, for anyone, but for him it's things like the bright colors and speed of a movie.  He also needs to be able to leave a space and come back to it when he's ready.  I don't question him a lot, because that can lead to arguments that are unnecessary.  But if he's leaving just to avoid me telling him he needs to get something done or change his behavior, that's a big no no.

G's my first, so he taught me a lot.  A lot that has essentially been useless in dealing with my other kids.  But I think that's the way of most things.  Individuals are all different, and finding how to relate to those in our lives can take quite a bit.  Even if you think you know that kid cuz he's easy or whatever.  One of my biggest pet peeves is people asking if a baby is good.  WTF?  When have you EVER met a bad or evil baby?  All babies are good.  Some are just easier than others.  And as I learned, easy girls aren't good girls.  Vocab matters.  My child is good, even if he's giving you a hard time.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 

Quoting hwblyf:

I've also not gotten a diagnosis for anything, we're not really sure what the diagnosis would or should be, but I know the pediatrician has spoken with me many times about medicating him or altering his diet.  But I ask, after sitting in a doctor's office for 20 to 30 minutes before seeing the doc, who wouldn't be antsy?  Anyway, G uses an exercise ball, he's constantly up and acting out scenes from a book, practices his version of martial arts moves, and just generally MOVES.  At two we were teaching him breathing and meditation.  He is who he is and he has always been this way.  I'm going to look for that book recommended earlier, too.  I don't believe every instance of differences needs to be medicated, I feel as though that's a crutch for the rest of us, so we don't have to deal with the kid and their needs.  I have severe allergies, and growing up I hated people who knew all the answers.  Just don't go outside.  Just don't keep x in your room (clothes, carpeting, stuffed animals, etc....).  Age has made a huge difference in G's life, as he is learning how to control himself, learning to express what he needs.  We haven't done the dietary changes, but I know a lot of people swear by them.  I think I'd just swear at them.  G's 10, by the way, and at 4, he would never have wanted to sit down and do work.  But learn?  Heck yeah.  :)

 LOL!!  I started out swearing at our diet changes, but I've seen better health in hubby and myself too, so I'm a convert!  :-)

We've also been doing breathing techniques...some yoga like the polar bear pose and dragon breath really help him when he gets would too tight.

I feel the same way, he is who he is.  He loves to learn and I just want to keep fostering that.  I like the idea of having him act out the parts of the book.  I wonder if puppets would be helpful!  You've given me a lot to ponder.  Thanks so much!



Molimomma
by Bronze Member on Oct. 29, 2013 at 1:02 PM


If playdough stresses you out do it outside! Get a big plastic tray or a plastic placemat to do it on and sit at your patio table or picnic table and any crumbs or mess will be outside.

as for Aps, it depends on your son's level and what he already knows but mine liked Teach me Toddler and moved up to Teach me Kindergarten. He regularly uses the Elmo ABCs ap, Reading Eggs Eggy Phonics and Eggy Numbers, Starfall and the 2 Sid the Science kid aps. He also LOVES the interactive books so we have a bunch of those aps too for the Sandra Boyton books and Peter Rabbit. I like the WordWorld ap too but he doesn't play that one very often but it's a great.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 

Quoting Molimomma:

Balance ball instead of a chair is great for focus. Lots of variation in learning, alternating quiet activities with active ones. For example we will sit a read his poem or story then go do an alphabet letter hunt. We will do a handwriting sheet then play a homemade math game. We also work on the floor more than at a table. We do playdough with alphabet or number cookie cutters, then he gets to just cut, smoosh, and squeeze for awhile. I piece my curriculum from Pinterest, my own collection when I was teaching and several great iPad aps.

 I do much of that already, thank you for the boost in confidence that I am probably doing some things right!  LOL

Which iPad apps have been the most helpful?  I hate playdoh *sigh* but from a lot of the other posts it looks like I'm going to have to get over it and pull it out more often!  Thanks again!



bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Oct. 29, 2013 at 1:05 PM

 Yeah, when I am having a migraine My lo's constant motion can be hard to take.  And I do agree all babies are good, that never made much sense to me either.  Q is my last, I'm afraid if he had been my first he would have been my only.  He is often exhausting. But I wouldn't trade him for the world, behavior and all.  It has been a lot of trial and error here too.  We do a "time out" that he decides himself.  We call it Barbados and I only suggest it, never send him there.  He also decides when he's ready to come back.  I found that having a true time out was horrible unless i actually sat there with him on my lap, but if he controls going and coming back, he comes back prepared to do what the rest of us are doing (at least for a little while.)  So yeah, trial and error, but it's getting better.  I'm getting better at apropriate expectations and other options.

Quoting hwblyf:

 

It's funny, the acting it out is all him.  There's very little about him that's been receptive to influences, though, so all his behaviors are all him.  :)  So much has been trial and error.  I've wanted so bad to give him fiddle things (stress balls and whatnot), but those don't appeal to him.  I have motion sensitivities (it can make my head hurt and make me need to vomit if I am having eye/motion issues), so sometimes his constant motion isn't appreciated!  He also needs the space to be himself.  He has sensory issues, so there is a lot to life he can't do that seem harmless.  Those darn bouncy houses that everyone thinks is such a treat for kids?  He can't behave himself near those to save his life.  Overstimulation is always bad, for anyone, but for him it's things like the bright colors and speed of a movie.  He also needs to be able to leave a space and come back to it when he's ready.  I don't question him a lot, because that can lead to arguments that are unnecessary.  But if he's leaving just to avoid me telling him he needs to get something done or change his behavior, that's a big no no.

G's my first, so he taught me a lot.  A lot that has essentially been useless in dealing with my other kids.  But I think that's the way of most things.  Individuals are all different, and finding how to relate to those in our lives can take quite a bit.  Even if you think you know that kid cuz he's easy or whatever.  One of my biggest pet peeves is people asking if a baby is good.  WTF?  When have you EVER met a bad or evil baby?  All babies are good.  Some are just easier than others.  And as I learned, easy girls aren't good girls.  Vocab matters.  My child is good, even if he's giving you a hard time.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 

Quoting hwblyf:

I've also not gotten a diagnosis for anything, we're not really sure what the diagnosis would or should be, but I know the pediatrician has spoken with me many times about medicating him or altering his diet.  But I ask, after sitting in a doctor's office for 20 to 30 minutes before seeing the doc, who wouldn't be antsy?  Anyway, G uses an exercise ball, he's constantly up and acting out scenes from a book, practices his version of martial arts moves, and just generally MOVES.  At two we were teaching him breathing and meditation.  He is who he is and he has always been this way.  I'm going to look for that book recommended earlier, too.  I don't believe every instance of differences needs to be medicated, I feel as though that's a crutch for the rest of us, so we don't have to deal with the kid and their needs.  I have severe allergies, and growing up I hated people who knew all the answers.  Just don't go outside.  Just don't keep x in your room (clothes, carpeting, stuffed animals, etc....).  Age has made a huge difference in G's life, as he is learning how to control himself, learning to express what he needs.  We haven't done the dietary changes, but I know a lot of people swear by them.  I think I'd just swear at them.  G's 10, by the way, and at 4, he would never have wanted to sit down and do work.  But learn?  Heck yeah.  :)

 LOL!!  I started out swearing at our diet changes, but I've seen better health in hubby and myself too, so I'm a convert!  :-)

We've also been doing breathing techniques...some yoga like the polar bear pose and dragon breath really help him when he gets would too tight.

I feel the same way, he is who he is.  He loves to learn and I just want to keep fostering that.  I like the idea of having him act out the parts of the book.  I wonder if puppets would be helpful!  You've given me a lot to ponder.  Thanks so much!

 

 

 

bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Oct. 29, 2013 at 1:08 PM

 Thank you!  I'm looking into those apps right now!  :-)

Yeah, outside would be better for me, but it is getting COLD out there.  Today the high is 37.  Blah! Maybe in the spring.  :-)

Quoting Molimomma:

 

If playdough stresses you out do it outside! Get a big plastic tray or a plastic placemat to do it on and sit at your patio table or picnic table and any crumbs or mess will be outside.

as for Aps, it depends on your son's level and what he already knows but mine liked Teach me Toddler and moved up to Teach me Kindergarten. He regularly uses the Elmo ABCs ap, Reading Eggs Eggy Phonics and Eggy Numbers, Starfall and the 2 Sid the Science kid aps. He also LOVES the interactive books so we have a bunch of those aps too for the Sandra Boyton books and Peter Rabbit. I like the WordWorld ap too but he doesn't play that one very often but it's a great.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 

Quoting Molimomma:

Balance ball instead of a chair is great for focus. Lots of variation in learning, alternating quiet activities with active ones. For example we will sit a read his poem or story then go do an alphabet letter hunt. We will do a handwriting sheet then play a homemade math game. We also work on the floor more than at a table. We do playdough with alphabet or number cookie cutters, then he gets to just cut, smoosh, and squeeze for awhile. I piece my curriculum from Pinterest, my own collection when I was teaching and several great iPad aps.

 I do much of that already, thank you for the boost in confidence that I am probably doing some things right!  LOL

Which iPad apps have been the most helpful?  I hate playdoh *sigh* but from a lot of the other posts it looks like I'm going to have to get over it and pull it out more often!  Thanks again!

 

 

 

romacox
by Silver Member on Oct. 29, 2013 at 1:33 PM
Many in my family history would be diagnosed with ADHD today. When the Country was mostly farming and ranching, it was considered a gift to have such a child. But, because we are more sedimentary, it is considered "wrong". My oldest daughter, and myself, would have been considered ADHD, but she had no problems, and I did not either. Today I tutor many children diagnosed with ADHD and other learning disabilities. I use much the same approach as you do bluerooffarm...physically involving them in the learning process, also known as whole brain teaching. With this method, they learn very well, and love it. My experience has been much like yours.
coala
by Silver Member on Oct. 29, 2013 at 1:37 PM

Honestly....I don't know if mine truly is, but she can't sit still to save her life.  I let her bounce and move.  The only time I require her to sit still is while she is working on her handwritting.  I need her to sit still in a chair and face forward.  This is proving to get a little easier as she is getting older....she is only 5 and working hard on these skills.  I don't expect my kids to stay in their seats all day, but they need to sit at a table to write properly.

bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Oct. 29, 2013 at 1:47 PM
1 mom liked this

 

Quoting romacox:

Many in my family history would be diagnosed with ADHD today. When the Country was mostly farming and ranching, it was considered a gift to have such a child. But, because we are more sedimentary, it is considered "wrong". My oldest daughter, and myself, would have been considered ADHD, but she had no problems, and I did not either. Today I tutor many children diagnosed with ADHD and other learning disabilities. I use much the same approach as you do bluerooffarm...physically involving them in the learning process, also known as whole brain teaching. With this method, they learn very well, and love it. My experience has been much like yours.

 Thanks, I am trying.  Running after him taught me a lot during those hairy toddler years.  I'm just thinking about the future and trying to get a running list of tools for my tool belt and things others have learned to avoid. 

He is already asking about 4-H and raising rabbits.  He's not ready yet, but I think I agree that in farm life his energy can definately be a gift.  :-)

bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Oct. 29, 2013 at 1:55 PM

 

Quoting coala:

Honestly....I don't know if mine truly is, but she can't sit still to save her life.  I let her bounce and move.  The only time I require her to sit still is while she is working on her handwritting.  I need her to sit still in a chair and face forward.  This is proving to get a little easier as she is getting older....she is only 5 and working hard on these skills.  I don't expect my kids to stay in their seats all day, but they need to sit at a table to write properly.

 Q is almost never in his seat, but he can sit still for about 5 minutes for copy work.  So that's a plus!

I've gathered a whole lot of hands-on manipulatives...connectagons, the big fluffy pipe cleanedrs, legos, marble runs, a clock, and of course a tablet. 

There is a website http://www.helpguide.org/mental/adhd_add_signs_symptoms.htm
That talks about needing to show so many of the symptoms, and my little guy shows nearly all of them.  But of course it also states very clearly that you need a doctor to diagnose, but if I do get him diagnosed they'd want to start looking for meds.  I went through the wheel of medications when I was in college and it was never worth it.  But it did help me kind of start searching for methods to use and techniques to help him deal.

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