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Okay moms with unmedicated ADHD kids....

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 What curricula have you found that work well with your little wigglers?  And What curricula would you avoid like the plague?

I will not get my youngest diagnosed because I do not want to hear about medications.  He is who he is and we will take it as it comes.  That said, I know he'll always need to move more, use his whole body in his learning, and move from activity to activity a bit more often.  I still plan on slowly increasing his attention span (for some reason my hubby was concerned that not getting a diagnoses and not getting medication meant that I wasn't going to address his issues at all.)

We treat with: proper sleep schedules, proper nutrition, and exercise. 

by on Oct. 29, 2013 at 9:03 AM
Replies (31-40):
coala
by Silver Member on Oct. 29, 2013 at 2:04 PM
1 mom liked this

My LO's dad is text book ADHD.  His mom ran the gamut with trying to find a solution before she turned to meds and that was back in the mid to later 80's.  I can almost guarantee if this child was in a BM school she would be in trouble constantly and they would insist on a diagnosis.  I think its great when we can find something to help them.  I can tell you that by eliminating corn and corn by products from her diet (not because of the behavior but because it was causing reflux) she has gotten so much better.  Her corn allergy was contributing to her ADHD tendancies.  Her skating coach has even been able to see a difference....and when she isn't able to focus he will ask me what she has eaten over the last few days.  He is in for a treat today as she went to a HS fall party yesterday and it was all I could do to keep her away from the Cheeto's.  She ate other stuff and I'm sure it wasn't all corn free, but I did take pumpkin oatmeal muffins that she is addicted to at the moment.  We will see how it goes this evening.  LOL


Quoting bluerooffarm:

 

Quoting coala:

Honestly....I don't know if mine truly is, but she can't sit still to save her life.  I let her bounce and move.  The only time I require her to sit still is while she is working on her handwritting.  I need her to sit still in a chair and face forward.  This is proving to get a little easier as she is getting older....she is only 5 and working hard on these skills.  I don't expect my kids to stay in their seats all day, but they need to sit at a table to write properly.

 Q is almost never in his seat, but he can sit still for about 5 minutes for copy work.  So that's a plus!

I've gathered a whole lot of hands-on manipulatives...connectagons, the big fluffy pipe cleanedrs, legos, marble runs, a clock, and of course a tablet. 

There is a website http://www.helpguide.org/mental/adhd_add_signs_symptoms.htm
That talks about needing to show so many of the symptoms, and my little guy shows nearly all of them.  But of course it also states very clearly that you need a doctor to diagnose, but if I do get him diagnosed they'd want to start looking for meds.  I went through the wheel of medications when I was in college and it was never worth it.  But it did help me kind of start searching for methods to use and techniques to help him deal.



bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Oct. 29, 2013 at 2:13 PM

 We are big on the diet stuff!  We have eliminated all processed food, which probably does limit his corn intake.  I've seen a difference by completely getting rid of the processed sugars.  It has been hard on all of us.  We all have sweet teeth *gg* but I have seen such a big difference in all of us.  It keeps me going.  Plus when I am weak enough to get ice cream, I get punished for it!  Lol! 

Quoting coala:

My LO's dad is text book ADHD.  His mom ran the gamut with trying to find a solution before she turned to meds and that was back in the mid to later 80's.  I can almost guarantee if this child was in a BM school she would be in trouble constantly and they would insist on a diagnosis.  I think its great when we can find something to help them.  I can tell you that by eliminating corn and corn by products from her diet (not because of the behavior but because it was causing reflux) she has gotten so much better.  Her corn allergy was contributing to her ADHD tendancies.  Her skating coach has even been able to see a difference....and when she isn't able to focus he will ask me what she has eaten over the last few days.  He is in for a treat today as she went to a HS fall party yesterday and it was all I could do to keep her away from the Cheeto's.  She ate other stuff and I'm sure it wasn't all corn free, but I did take pumpkin oatmeal muffins that she is addicted to at the moment.  We will see how it goes this evening.  LOL

 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 

Quoting coala:

Honestly....I don't know if mine truly is, but she can't sit still to save her life.  I let her bounce and move.  The only time I require her to sit still is while she is working on her handwritting.  I need her to sit still in a chair and face forward.  This is proving to get a little easier as she is getting older....she is only 5 and working hard on these skills.  I don't expect my kids to stay in their seats all day, but they need to sit at a table to write properly.

 Q is almost never in his seat, but he can sit still for about 5 minutes for copy work.  So that's a plus!

I've gathered a whole lot of hands-on manipulatives...connectagons, the big fluffy pipe cleanedrs, legos, marble runs, a clock, and of course a tablet. 

There is a website http://www.helpguide.org/mental/adhd_add_signs_symptoms.htm
That talks about needing to show so many of the symptoms, and my little guy shows nearly all of them.  But of course it also states very clearly that you need a doctor to diagnose, but if I do get him diagnosed they'd want to start looking for meds.  I went through the wheel of medications when I was in college and it was never worth it.  But it did help me kind of start searching for methods to use and techniques to help him deal.

 

 

 

hwblyf
by Silver Member on Oct. 29, 2013 at 3:01 PM


I've had a lot of people tell me about which kid would have been an only if he/she had been first.  G's my challenge, but I went on to have 4 more.  :)  My kids are all about 1.5 years apart, so about the time he started walking, I was pregnant with my 2nd.  And don't think I wasn't wondering what was wrong with me!  But I'm glad I have my 4 following kiddos.  I can't imagine what our life would be like without any of them.  But man, some days, I can totally imagine what a calmer life would be like.  :)

Oh, and something else he's made me do, by virtue of who he is--I question how valuable a lot of things are.  When he was in 2nd, he battled me once for 5 hours over a spelling assignment for his ps class.  5 hours.  Really?  So not worth it.  And the boy can spell, it was just the assignment.  So why do we force things that are unnecessary?  I question a lot more now.  And I've always been a questioner, so to up it, that's quite a feat he's accomplished!

Look up relaxation or calming bottles, too.  There are a whole variety, Dr. Jean was whose I used when I student taught kinder.  The one that sticks with me the most is taking a smaller bottle (water bottle, small soda, etc.) and filling it with puff balls.  When he's having a hard time focusing or keeping his hands to himself, have him get the balls out of the bottle and then put them back in.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 Yeah, when I am having a migraine My lo's constant motion can be hard to take.  And I do agree all babies are good, that never made much sense to me either.  Q is my last, I'm afraid if he had been my first he would have been my only.  He is often exhausting. But I wouldn't trade him for the world, behavior and all.  It has been a lot of trial and error here too.  We do a "time out" that he decides himself.  We call it Barbados and I only suggest it, never send him there.  He also decides when he's ready to come back.  I found that having a true time out was horrible unless i actually sat there with him on my lap, but if he controls going and coming back, he comes back prepared to do what the rest of us are doing (at least for a little while.)  So yeah, trial and error, but it's getting better.  I'm getting better at apropriate expectations and other options.

Quoting hwblyf:


It's funny, the acting it out is all him.  There's very little about him that's been receptive to influences, though, so all his behaviors are all him.  :)  So much has been trial and error.  I've wanted so bad to give him fiddle things (stress balls and whatnot), but those don't appeal to him.  I have motion sensitivities (it can make my head hurt and make me need to vomit if I am having eye/motion issues), so sometimes his constant motion isn't appreciated!  He also needs the space to be himself.  He has sensory issues, so there is a lot to life he can't do that seem harmless.  Those darn bouncy houses that everyone thinks is such a treat for kids?  He can't behave himself near those to save his life.  Overstimulation is always bad, for anyone, but for him it's things like the bright colors and speed of a movie.  He also needs to be able to leave a space and come back to it when he's ready.  I don't question him a lot, because that can lead to arguments that are unnecessary.  But if he's leaving just to avoid me telling him he needs to get something done or change his behavior, that's a big no no.

G's my first, so he taught me a lot.  A lot that has essentially been useless in dealing with my other kids.  But I think that's the way of most things.  Individuals are all different, and finding how to relate to those in our lives can take quite a bit.  Even if you think you know that kid cuz he's easy or whatever.  One of my biggest pet peeves is people asking if a baby is good.  WTF?  When have you EVER met a bad or evil baby?  All babies are good.  Some are just easier than others.  And as I learned, easy girls aren't good girls.  Vocab matters.  My child is good, even if he's giving you a hard time.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 

Quoting hwblyf:

I've also not gotten a diagnosis for anything, we're not really sure what the diagnosis would or should be, but I know the pediatrician has spoken with me many times about medicating him or altering his diet.  But I ask, after sitting in a doctor's office for 20 to 30 minutes before seeing the doc, who wouldn't be antsy?  Anyway, G uses an exercise ball, he's constantly up and acting out scenes from a book, practices his version of martial arts moves, and just generally MOVES.  At two we were teaching him breathing and meditation.  He is who he is and he has always been this way.  I'm going to look for that book recommended earlier, too.  I don't believe every instance of differences needs to be medicated, I feel as though that's a crutch for the rest of us, so we don't have to deal with the kid and their needs.  I have severe allergies, and growing up I hated people who knew all the answers.  Just don't go outside.  Just don't keep x in your room (clothes, carpeting, stuffed animals, etc....).  Age has made a huge difference in G's life, as he is learning how to control himself, learning to express what he needs.  We haven't done the dietary changes, but I know a lot of people swear by them.  I think I'd just swear at them.  G's 10, by the way, and at 4, he would never have wanted to sit down and do work.  But learn?  Heck yeah.  :)

 LOL!!  I started out swearing at our diet changes, but I've seen better health in hubby and myself too, so I'm a convert!  :-)

We've also been doing breathing techniques...some yoga like the polar bear pose and dragon breath really help him when he gets would too tight.

I feel the same way, he is who he is.  He loves to learn and I just want to keep fostering that.  I like the idea of having him act out the parts of the book.  I wonder if puppets would be helpful!  You've given me a lot to ponder.  Thanks so much!



 



bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Oct. 29, 2013 at 3:18 PM
1 mom liked this

 I've seen how Q has gotten me to question how and why I do things too.  Like writing!  I now realize that I started making them write their own thoughts way too early.  I have him tell me a story, I write it down (and fix the grammar) and then have him copy it.  He writes much more complicated sentences than older brother does.  So now I am slapping my forehead...DUH of course they try to simplify it when they are trying to remember what they want to get down and still think about what each letter looks like.

I've got the recipe for a relaxation bottle pinned, I keep meaning to make it and keep putting it off.  We have this candle that the snowflakes up on the top spin around and make shadows on the wall.  It's how we've gotten him to calm down at night.  I have to sit right there with him though because a candle is so dangerous!  Those bottles are probably a much better solution!  Thanks!

Quoting hwblyf:

 

I've had a lot of people tell me about which kid would have been an only if he/she had been first.  G's my challenge, but I went on to have 4 more.  :)  My kids are all about 1.5 years apart, so about the time he started walking, I was pregnant with my 2nd.  And don't think I wasn't wondering what was wrong with me!  But I'm glad I have my 4 following kiddos.  I can't imagine what our life would be like without any of them.  But man, some days, I can totally imagine what a calmer life would be like.  :)

Oh, and something else he's made me do, by virtue of who he is--I question how valuable a lot of things are.  When he was in 2nd, he battled me once for 5 hours over a spelling assignment for his ps class.  5 hours.  Really?  So not worth it.  And the boy can spell, it was just the assignment.  So why do we force things that are unnecessary?  I question a lot more now.  And I've always been a questioner, so to up it, that's quite a feat he's accomplished!

Look up relaxation or calming bottles, too.  There are a whole variety, Dr. Jean was whose I used when I student taught kinder.  The one that sticks with me the most is taking a smaller bottle (water bottle, small soda, etc.) and filling it with puff balls.  When he's having a hard time focusing or keeping his hands to himself, have him get the balls out of the bottle and then put them back in.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 Yeah, when I am having a migraine My lo's constant motion can be hard to take.  And I do agree all babies are good, that never made much sense to me either.  Q is my last, I'm afraid if he had been my first he would have been my only.  He is often exhausting. But I wouldn't trade him for the world, behavior and all.  It has been a lot of trial and error here too.  We do a "time out" that he decides himself.  We call it Barbados and I only suggest it, never send him there.  He also decides when he's ready to come back.  I found that having a true time out was horrible unless i actually sat there with him on my lap, but if he controls going and coming back, he comes back prepared to do what the rest of us are doing (at least for a little while.)  So yeah, trial and error, but it's getting better.  I'm getting better at apropriate expectations and other options.

Quoting hwblyf:

 

 

 

 

 

romacox
by Silver Member on Oct. 29, 2013 at 5:54 PM
processed food is an important food to eliminate, and so is sugar. I find we can use 100% Stevia in place of surgar. I get it from Amazon, but it is also in health food stores. I never use the Stevia in the grocery stores...it is processed.
Quoting bluerooffarm:

 We are big on the diet stuff!  We have eliminated all processed food, which probably does limit his corn intake.  I've seen a difference by completely getting rid of the processed sugars.  It has been hard on all of us.  We all have sweet teeth *gg* but I have seen such a big difference in all of us.  It keeps me going.  Plus when I am weak enough to get ice cream, I get punished for it!  Lol! 

Quoting coala:

My LO's dad is text book ADHD.  His mom ran the gamut with trying to find a solution before she turned to meds and that was back in the mid to later 80's.  I can almost guarantee if this child was in a BM school she would be in trouble constantly and they would insist on a diagnosis.  I think its great when we can find something to help them.  I can tell you that by eliminating corn and corn by products from her diet (not because of the behavior but because it was causing reflux) she has gotten so much better.  Her corn allergy was contributing to her ADHD tendancies.  Her skating coach has even been able to see a difference....and when she isn't able to focus he will ask me what she has eaten over the last few days.  He is in for a treat today as she went to a HS fall party yesterday and it was all I could do to keep her away from the Cheeto's.  She ate other stuff and I'm sure it wasn't all corn free, but I did take pumpkin oatmeal muffins that she is addicted to at the moment.  We will see how it goes this evening.  LOL

 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 

Quoting coala:

Honestly....I don't know if mine truly is, but she can't sit still to save her life.  I let her bounce and move.  The only time I require her to sit still is while she is working on her handwritting.  I need her to sit still in a chair and face forward.  This is proving to get a little easier as she is getting older....she is only 5 and working hard on these skills.  I don't expect my kids to stay in their seats all day, but they need to sit at a table to write properly.

 Q is almost never in his seat, but he can sit still for about 5 minutes for copy work.  So that's a plus!

I've gathered a whole lot of hands-on manipulatives...connectagons, the big fluffy pipe cleanedrs, legos, marble runs, a clock, and of course a tablet. 

There is a website http://www.helpguide.org/mental/adhd_add_signs_symptoms.htm
That talks about needing to show so many of the symptoms, and my little guy shows nearly all of them.  But of course it also states very clearly that you need a doctor to diagnose, but if I do get him diagnosed they'd want to start looking for meds.  I went through the wheel of medications when I was in college and it was never worth it.  But it did help me kind of start searching for methods to use and techniques to help him deal.

 

 

 


MommeisQueen
by Member on Oct. 29, 2013 at 5:57 PM

Getting a diagnoses doesn't mean getting medication. It will help if you want him to recieve serves such as Occupational Therapy to treat his ADHD. We've tried the ADHD diet (protein and complex carbs), "Proper" sleep (HA) and the whole nine but nothing has helped as much as the OT in conjunction with our Prayers(Thank you LORD) and commitment.

romacox
by Silver Member on Oct. 29, 2013 at 5:59 PM

Information on Stevia

Stevia from Amazon


and I have sweetened pies with concentrated apple juice, and thickening the juice with tapioca.

Periodic breaks, for children with ADHD, that release energy also helps... Like a run around the house once or twice. Even adults with ADHD need daily physical activity

ablackdolphin
by Bronze Member on Oct. 29, 2013 at 6:26 PM
1 mom liked this

MY DD (4) is a HUGE wiggler.  She jumps up and down on the chair in our living room while watching Magic School Bus.

We use Handwriting Without Tears and Right Start Math and she really loves them both.  Handwriting Without Tears is awesome because there are lots of fun songs and lots of ways to do the same thing!

ablackdolphin
by Bronze Member on Oct. 29, 2013 at 6:26 PM
1 mom liked this

We have a mini trampoline too, it's AWESOME!

Chasing3
by Bronze Member on Oct. 29, 2013 at 6:58 PM

more info on Stevia. It's not the natural product you may think it is. At least not how it's sold in the US.

http://foodbabe.com/tag/organic-stevia/


sorry, that button for an active link is always grey for me and doesn't work.

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