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Okay moms with unmedicated ADHD kids....

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 What curricula have you found that work well with your little wigglers?  And What curricula would you avoid like the plague?

I will not get my youngest diagnosed because I do not want to hear about medications.  He is who he is and we will take it as it comes.  That said, I know he'll always need to move more, use his whole body in his learning, and move from activity to activity a bit more often.  I still plan on slowly increasing his attention span (for some reason my hubby was concerned that not getting a diagnoses and not getting medication meant that I wasn't going to address his issues at all.)

We treat with: proper sleep schedules, proper nutrition, and exercise. 

by on Oct. 29, 2013 at 9:03 AM
Replies (71-80):
bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Nov. 5, 2013 at 4:22 PM

 Thanks...looking up toca boca.

Also I have heard good things about Waldorf.  I'll have to look up some info on it too!  Very helpful!

Quoting -Teeter-Totter-:

Timberdoodle has great manipulatives and picks for active kids.

I think theres a montessori wiki with tons of calming but fun activities.

There's also some great games for the iPod, nook, kindle, etc such as the letter tracing ones and just about everything by toca boca. We occasionally let our kiddos play those with us, and even our wild one will play quietly and gently so she can play too :)

We just started a few months ago with ours, using the Starfall.com preschool curriculum and love it! I kind of mix and match the lesson plans to our liking...but every day we do a movement song, read a nursery rhyme and a story, do a circle time activity, then in the afternoons we do an art project or family game. They are an amazing resource for a zillion fun songs, stories and games-hard copies and online.

We also do waldorf-y activities on a weekly rhythm, like the baking, working with clay, painting, polishing, etc...and that is something ours look forward to and I use to promote calmness :)



 

celticdragon77
by on Nov. 6, 2013 at 9:34 AM

I responded to this post (asking your childs age) originally late in the evening while at work. I saw that you responded the next day at lunch time after just finishing up school with my kids. I had forgot the exact details of your post by then. I knew ADHD and curriculums were mentioned. 

I thought maybe I had a bit of help to offer because my family has seen a family counselor for ADD (we have 3 people who display those symptoms). We are NOT on meds and have learned strategys to help us cope. My own son displayed hyper activity at an early age. However, it has subsided quite a bit over the years (he is now 12). However, when you mentioned the age (4rs), it caught me off guard. I was expecting that it was one of your older sons. 

I did not remember that you did not want your child seen for ADD by any doctors. However, you should know that not all family counselors push meds. All of them should specialize in techniques to help beyond just meds.

It is common place to go to a doctor / counsler for ADHD and so my advice seemed appropriate. People do not go to doctors for being Catholic. So there IS a slight difference here. 

I did also address the curriculum portion of this post in a different paragraph and I am totally cool if that isn't the advice that works for you. I just come in here and respond with my own perspective on the topics. 

I have enjoyed many conversations in here with you and others as well. I am doing really good. I can not help that I have a different perspective, and you and a few others may not understand it, but it doesn't mean that I do not have invalid points or that something is wrong with me. Contrary to what you might think, some people in this group actually think I made some valid points in that post that you are referring to. Just a difference of opinion and I am cool with that. I tried to remain honest yet respectful and allowed no negative energy in my heart, mind or words over the matter.

I wish for the best with this situation. You are a smart caring parent and I am sure it will work out. 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 Why would you think that I would possibly understand what you meant?  I asked for curriculum suggestions and your answer was to talk to our pediatrician.  I have not been snarky, but whatever.  I do not wish to talk to a counselor or my pediatrician about ADHD, as I do not want a diagnosis.  I do not want to have a constant battle about medications.  I know he has what others would call ADHD.  It is obvious. 

I know that many others in this group have chosen not to medicate their children and I was wondering what curriculum they liked.  Just as others have comeinto the group looking for Catholic curriculum or young earth curriculum or any other curriculum.  I appreciate the Montesorri advice, I already have a few books on the subject and will probably follow more of that method with this youngest.  But I like curriculum and he likes to be like his big brothers.  So we want to use a curriculum.

I say this with all due respect Celtic, because I have had some really great conversations with you.  You have really been bringing a lot into these discussions lately that are really not there.  Are you okay?

Quoting celticdragon77:

I am not going to sink to the snarky level in this group.

I am pretty sure that you understood what I meant, but just in-case...

I didnt think that they usually diagnosis ADHD any earlier than age 6. I do not know your childs situation. However, 4 seems very young to to label / diagnosis a child as ADHD. I was suggesting a pediatrician or family counselor to talk to about this issue of ADHD. They are usually who people go to with these types of matters. A family counselor might have some tips regarding ADHD and homeschooling/education, and that information might help you determine what curriculum is a better match. 

I mentioned the Montessori approach because its designed in a way that works for younger kids, because they are more active, have short attention spans, and need mental/psychical stimulation. I said that I didnt suggest ANY "curriculum" for a 4yr old adhd boy - and mentioned the Montessori idea in lieu of a "curriculum". 

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 I'm not sure how a pediatrician would help pick out a curriculum, but thank you.

Quoting celticdragon77:

Have you talked to your pediatrician? I think a pediatrician or a family counselor would be your best source. 

4 seems a little early to label a child as ADHD. 

We did a lot of Montessori activities at the age your son is at, so there was a lot of interactive things to keep them busy. Mentally and physically they need stimulated at those ages - but with with short activities. If he has ADHD, I would think just that alone should help some. 

As for curriculums... I don't know if I would use any curriculums on a 4yr old with adhd.

That's just my thoughts anyways. 


Quoting bluerooffarm:

 

Quoting celticdragon77:

Did I miss the age of your son in the post?

 He's 4, so I am just at the beginning with his education.  I already know that much of what I do with my oldest will not work with him, so I am just picking the brains of the ones who have already gone through it.  Oh yeah, and I am picking out curriculum for next year already.


 


 


AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Nov. 6, 2013 at 10:36 AM

Miquon Math, if he's the mathy sort. It's for grades 1-4, but I'm using it for my 4 year old this year. Play based, C-rod based. No need to sit entirely still. My son isn't ADHD, but like most 4 year olds, he views sitting still for any period of time to be akin to Black Death. He *loves* this math though, and happily focuses on it - since it's play and rod based, there's no need to be *still*.

I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















celticdragon77
by on Nov. 6, 2013 at 10:48 AM
1 mom liked this

I want to add that since you are interested in a curriculum for your child, that Cathy Duffy has curriculums organized based on learning styles, and "wiggly willy" is one of the categories that she uses that might be useful to you. 

http://homecrusadersedu.com/styles.html

http://cathyduffyreviews.com/

I also saw educational catalogues that had ADHD sections in them, and they sold various items that were geared towards ADHD children.  

bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Nov. 6, 2013 at 11:00 AM

 

Quoting AutymsMommy:

Miquon Math, if he's the mathy sort. It's for grades 1-4, but I'm using it for my 4 year old this year. Play based, C-rod based. No need to sit entirely still. My son isn't ADHD, but like most 4 year olds, he views sitting still for any period of time to be akin to Black Death. He *loves* this math though, and happily focuses on it - since it's play and rod based, there's no need to be *still*.

 Thank you!  The video on their website looks awesome!  I definately think that looks good for him!

AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Nov. 6, 2013 at 11:06 AM


Check out Education Unboxed for more c-rod activities. It's great!

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 

Quoting AutymsMommy:

Miquon Math, if he's the mathy sort. It's for grades 1-4, but I'm using it for my 4 year old this year. Play based, C-rod based. No need to sit entirely still. My son isn't ADHD, but like most 4 year olds, he views sitting still for any period of time to be akin to Black Death. He *loves* this math though, and happily focuses on it - since it's play and rod based, there's no need to be *still*.

 Thank you!  The video on their website looks awesome!  I definately think that looks good for him!



I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Nov. 6, 2013 at 11:12 AM

 

Quoting celticdragon77:

I want to add that since you are interested in a curriculum for your child, that Cathy Duffy has curriculums organized based on learning styles, and "wiggly willy" is one of the categories that she uses that might be useful to you. 

http://homecrusadersedu.com/styles.html

http://cathyduffyreviews.com/

I also saw educational catalogues that had ADHD sections in them, and they sold various items that were geared towards ADHD children.  

 Thank you this was very helpful.

celtic77dragon
by Member on Jan. 3, 2014 at 11:54 PM

I just reread my replies here (pages 7 and 8) because you said that I replied here "with baggage". I was ready to apologize if I had done so. However, I handled myself respectfully here. 

I stayed fairly well on topic and I even went and found useful links when you explained further about what you were looking for.

I looked through a few replies here by others and there are a lot of people leaving their two cents without recommending a curriculum. Other things regarding ADHD were discussed freely here - even by you. 

I am not going to apologize for thinking this was snarky: "I'm not sure how a pediatrician would help pick out a curriculum, but thank you." I find it too difficult to believe that you seriously think that the below reply was telling you to do that.  

Quote:

Have you talked to your pediatrician? I think a pediatrician or a family counselor would be your best source. 

4 seems a little early to label a child as ADHD. 

We did a lot of Montessori activities at the age your son is at, so there was a lot of interactive things to keep them busy. Mentally and physically they need stimulated at those ages - but with with short activities. If he has ADHD, I would think just that alone should help some. 

As for curriculums... I don't know if I would use any curriculums on a 4yr old with adhd.

 

That's just my thoughts anyways. 


JKronrod
by Bronze Member on Jan. 4, 2014 at 12:20 AM

I applaud you for trying to do this drug-free.  We have ADD issues with at least three of our four.  One thing I have noticed is that it is possible to 'practice' sitting still and paying attention (in addition to proper sleep schedules, food and exercise).  Like anything else it is possible to create a habit of attention.  I'm not certain if it would work with every child (I used to babysit a boy who was constantly in motion - my kids are nothing in comparison -- and I don't know if it would work with someone like him), but at least for our kids the challenge (game) of "Can you sit still for X seconds,"  etc. if done consistently, did seem to help a bit. 

I will also tell you that one of my favorite clients, who is in his 90s now, was so wiggly when he was in school that they put his desk out in the hall ... permanently.  He grew up to get a Ph.D, start several successful companies, get a bunch of patents in medical devices (and in other areas) which saved thousands of lives, and generally became extremely successful.  I worry that the medications may do things to the brains of this type of child that would change that type of outcome (although I don't envy the teachers he had in grade school....) 

bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Jan. 5, 2014 at 10:05 AM

Thank you!  With my son, he can very easily sit still for 20 minutes if the activity for which he's sitting is something he's interested in.  For example, he can sit and put together a lego creation (following instructions and all).  BUT for things he's not interested in, forget about it!  LOL.  Thankfully he is very interested in science experiments and math lessons!  We are trying to build his sitting attention for other things, too, but it is slow going so far.

I worry about what the meds do as well.  I was thrown out into the hall for my entire 9th grade english class!  LOL.  I had patient teachers up to that point, but I would get on that lady's last nerve!  Also she did all copy work and memorization, so that was part of it.  I believe my son will be some kind of builder (architect) or inventor when he grows up because he is constantly fiddling with things to make them better.  His lego creations (after he follows the instructions) later he goes back and changes things up to add catapults and water wheels, etc!  

Quoting JKronrod:

I applaud you for trying to do this drug-free.  We have ADD issues with at least three of our four.  One thing I have noticed is that it is possible to 'practice' sitting still and paying attention (in addition to proper sleep schedules, food and exercise).  Like anything else it is possible to create a habit of attention.  I'm not certain if it would work with every child (I used to babysit a boy who was constantly in motion - my kids are nothing in comparison -- and I don't know if it would work with someone like him), but at least for our kids the challenge (game) of "Can you sit still for X seconds,"  etc. if done consistently, did seem to help a bit. 

I will also tell you that one of my favorite clients, who is in his 90s now, was so wiggly when he was in school that they put his desk out in the hall ... permanently.  He grew up to get a Ph.D, start several successful companies, get a bunch of patents in medical devices (and in other areas) which saved thousands of lives, and generally became extremely successful.  I worry that the medications may do things to the brains of this type of child that would change that type of outcome (although I don't envy the teachers he had in grade school....) 


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