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Need Advice...Dyslexia....

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 I think my oldest may be dyslexic does anyone in here have experience with this? I could really use the help and advice. I plan on talking to her dr about it on tuesday, I homeschool her and things are becoming very frustrating, I have been doing my own research and so many things she has done over her lifetime, she is only 5, now makes so much since.

by on Nov. 3, 2013 at 4:25 PM
Replies (11-16):
Bleacheddecay
by Bronze Member on Nov. 3, 2013 at 7:22 PM

Maybe there will be resources wherever you go. Regardless I hope you can get your and your child's frustrating to lessen once you know something. There are things you can google that will help too. I was somewhat relieved to know we'd just naturally drifted into them during our homeschooling.


Quoting army_5_wife:

 will be talking to her pcm on tuesday to see what our first step needs to be, we are military and everything goes through the pcm first. unfortunately looking for rescoures around here wont do any good as we are leaving the country in just a couple of months.


Quoting Bleacheddecay:

Get her tested and then find out what local resources there are for her issues. I didn't find out about my son until he had won an athletic scholarship to college but I wish I'd known sooner. I'm sure there are ways to help and work around these issues.





mem82
by Platinum Member on Nov. 3, 2013 at 7:31 PM

Wow! Leaving the country must be a very stressful type of move. Hm, Does she do better on a computer? I think I read that sometimes kids with issues do better with a computer screen. I may just be nuts, too, though. Is it a move with the military? They might have some sort of support group on the base you are moving to.

Quoting army_5_wife:

 yes, i have read that and heard that a lot but its not just the writing backwards there are more signs I have noticed. And unfortunately looking for rescoures around here wont do any good as we are leaving the country in just a couple of months. We have worked on numbers for awhile and she is just barely able to read them, of course she gets 9 and 6 mixed up but that does not bother me i know that is normal. um, when she talks she is more than not miss pronouncing words i.e. speghetti is pseghetti, there are other words that I can not remember right now. She also has a hard time getting her thoughts out and finishing sentences.


Quoting mem82:

I know you already know this, but writing backwards isn't all that unusual. My own kids did it. I'm not sure if that gives any comfort or not. 8)

How does she do with numbers?

Quoting army_5_wife:

Thank you ladies I appreciate it. We had a much better day today with school but about 5 minutes after we were done, (she was trying to write on her own) she went right back to writing everything backwards. : /





KrissyKC
by Silver Member on Nov. 3, 2013 at 11:15 PM

Most of the things you discussed are pretty normal, but on a varying level.    ((ok, seriously, I just almost typed, "My five year old is the same age as your 5 yr old"   aaah... comedy relief!!!!))

Anyway, I was going to share about my Abby.   Abby is my third.   My older two went to public school for 3 yrs and 1 yr.   However, they both learned to read and do simple math concepts way before school.   I have a baby, too.

To the point, though, Abby is MUCH harder to teach than the other two.    She also mispronounces things, can't finish a thought a lot of time, repeats herself constantly,... etc...    She learns something one day and gets it wrong again for weeks afterward before recalling it again.   She gets certain things backward when writing and will often start out her words when trying to read them backward.   Life for "of" she starts with "f..." and ends up saying "for"...  I am constantly having to ask... "is that what it starts with?  Put your finger on the first letter."

Sometimes, it's about training the eyes and the mind to read from left to right.   Some kids do this quickly, while other's just don't.   Many of these kids flip their letters and words around for a year or two before getting the hang of it.

Now, some of them may end up later being diagnosed with something, but not necessarily.

If I were to warrant a guess, though, I'm pretty sure that Abby is dealing with ADHD because she fits almost every single marker on the Vanderbuilt exam.  She also fits the descriptions I'm finding of ODD.   However, I am pretty sure she isn't dyslexic or actually learning challenged.   The ADHD is more about focus and just having too many distractions and too much mental (and physical) energy.   I have to teach her with that in mind, so it makes the process a ton slower.

Not sure if this helps... but figured I'd share where we are at.


army_5_wife
by on Nov. 4, 2013 at 8:54 AM

 lol, yes it helped thank you. She really doesnt have an issue with letters it is the numbers that have she has an issue with. And she will do the exact same thing learn something and then its like im having to reteach her. She is my oldest out of 4 she did go to prek for a couple of months but never opened up, her teacher and I talked and she mentioned how it took her a couple of weeks, but she finally figured out how to read my dd. My dd would only answer her correctly when she wanted to so she at times seemed like she knew nothing when she really did. Rhylee also used to write her name backwards but this was when she was 4 and we got that corrected finally. She used to be so easy to teach and now she is so much harder to teach things to. And the whole reading thing we are getting no where with that. Im honestly just at a loss and dont know where to go from here.


Quoting KrissyKC:

Most of the things you discussed are pretty normal, but on a varying level.    ((ok, seriously, I just almost typed, "My five year old is the same age as your 5 yr old"   aaah... comedy relief!!!!))

Anyway, I was going to share about my Abby.   Abby is my third.   My older two went to public school for 3 yrs and 1 yr.   However, they both learned to read and do simple math concepts way before school.   I have a baby, too.

To the point, though, Abby is MUCH harder to teach than the other two.    She also mispronounces things, can't finish a thought a lot of time, repeats herself constantly,... etc...    She learns something one day and gets it wrong again for weeks afterward before recalling it again.   She gets certain things backward when writing and will often start out her words when trying to read them backward.   Life for "of" she starts with "f..." and ends up saying "for"...  I am constantly having to ask... "is that what it starts with?  Put your finger on the first letter."

Sometimes, it's about training the eyes and the mind to read from left to right.   Some kids do this quickly, while other's just don't.   Many of these kids flip their letters and words around for a year or two before getting the hang of it.

Now, some of them may end up later being diagnosed with something, but not necessarily.

If I were to warrant a guess, though, I'm pretty sure that Abby is dealing with ADHD because she fits almost every single marker on the Vanderbuilt exam.  She also fits the descriptions I'm finding of ODD.   However, I am pretty sure she isn't dyslexic or actually learning challenged.   The ADHD is more about focus and just having too many distractions and too much mental (and physical) energy.   I have to teach her with that in mind, so it makes the process a ton slower.

Not sure if this helps... but figured I'd share where we are at.

 


 

AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Nov. 4, 2013 at 9:51 AM


I say this gently.

She may not be ready to read. Being ready to learn something as complicated as phonics is a cognitive milestone not unlike any other milestone - walking, talking, etc. If she isn't ready, she isn't ready. Not being ready at 5 isn't really indicative of anything on its own.

Does she know her letter sounds? If not, I might suggest you buy the Leapfrog Letter Factory DVD (the set that comes with flashcards, from Amazon). A few days with that, and she'll know her letter sounds (that DVD is a GODSEND, seriously, lol).

Also, what program are you using for phonics? We're using Phonics Pathways as our main program. Phonics Pathways is for both neurotypical AND dyslexic children - so if your dd IS dyslexic, it'll work; if she isn't, it'll work too.

I would, however, back off a bit and work on some phonemic awareness - make sure she can rhyme, knows her letters (upper and lower case) and letter sounds with Leapfrog's Letter Factory, make sure she understands that words are read from left to right, etc.

Quoting army_5_wife:

 lol, yes it helped thank you. She really doesnt have an issue with letters it is the numbers that have she has an issue with. And she will do the exact same thing learn something and then its like im having to reteach her. She is my oldest out of 4 she did go to prek for a couple of months but never opened up, her teacher and I talked and she mentioned how it took her a couple of weeks, but she finally figured out how to read my dd. My dd would only answer her correctly when she wanted to so she at times seemed like she knew nothing when she really did. Rhylee also used to write her name backwards but this was when she was 4 and we got that corrected finally. She used to be so easy to teach and now she is so much harder to teach things to. And the whole reading thing we are getting no where with that. Im honestly just at a loss and dont know where to go from here.


Quoting KrissyKC:

Most of the things you discussed are pretty normal, but on a varying level.    ((ok, seriously, I just almost typed, "My five year old is the same age as your 5 yr old"   aaah... comedy relief!!!!))

Anyway, I was going to share about my Abby.   Abby is my third.   My older two went to public school for 3 yrs and 1 yr.   However, they both learned to read and do simple math concepts way before school.   I have a baby, too.

To the point, though, Abby is MUCH harder to teach than the other two.    She also mispronounces things, can't finish a thought a lot of time, repeats herself constantly,... etc...    She learns something one day and gets it wrong again for weeks afterward before recalling it again.   She gets certain things backward when writing and will often start out her words when trying to read them backward.   Life for "of" she starts with "f..." and ends up saying "for"...  I am constantly having to ask... "is that what it starts with?  Put your finger on the first letter."

Sometimes, it's about training the eyes and the mind to read from left to right.   Some kids do this quickly, while other's just don't.   Many of these kids flip their letters and words around for a year or two before getting the hang of it.

Now, some of them may end up later being diagnosed with something, but not necessarily.

If I were to warrant a guess, though, I'm pretty sure that Abby is dealing with ADHD because she fits almost every single marker on the Vanderbuilt exam.  She also fits the descriptions I'm finding of ODD.   However, I am pretty sure she isn't dyslexic or actually learning challenged.   The ADHD is more about focus and just having too many distractions and too much mental (and physical) energy.   I have to teach her with that in mind, so it makes the process a ton slower.

Not sure if this helps... but figured I'd share where we are at.






I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















KrissyKC
by Silver Member on Nov. 4, 2013 at 10:00 AM

How are you teaching reading?   Are you using a phonics based or a memory based approach?    If you are using phonics, many of us make mistakes when pronouncing the sounds.   Like we say "B-uh" for the "b" sound.   So when the child sounds out a word like bat.. they sound it out like this:

"B-uh... aah... t-eh"  it's really hard to sound it out like that...  the words end up with extra sylables and additional sounds.   

There are some videos online that explain this.   Just search "teaching phonics videos" or something and see what comes up.

Also, she is only 5.   Learning should be very play based and fun.   It should never never never be stressful for her.   5 year olds don't think about their future or that they HAVE to learn anything.   They will only learn if they want to, so your biggest job is to help her to want to.   Your main job right now isn't to "teach" her reading or math or writing.. it's to share with her that learning is fun and rewarding.    There is no time line or deadline that she has to be reading by.

However, there are some techniques you can learn to help her.   Like working with patterns helps train her eye to read from left to right.   Working with playdoh helps strengthen her finger muscles and also to help her with hand-eye coordination.     Some one else suggested making pictures out of the numbers.   This person mentioned making a 5 look like a chef with the top part becoming his hat and the round part his face.   Basically you make bold numbers and then draw stuff on them to make them into stuff.   Later, when she makes it wrong, reads it backward, ask things like, "which way does the chef face?"

Good luck, learning to read can take time.   It's a work in progress, and like everything we do, it has times of high momentum and times of low momentum... sometimes learning seems to "stall", and that's usually when they need a rest.

 





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