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Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

Why did you choose homeschooling?

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Why did you choose homeschooling versus going the traditional school route for your child?  

by on Nov. 8, 2013 at 12:05 PM
Replies (11-20):
ablackdolphin
by Bronze Member on Nov. 8, 2013 at 5:13 PM
1 mom liked this

Here are a few:

1. Back in the 80's my sister's boyfriend brought a gun to school and threatend her life. Way before all the school shootings started!

2. My school experience sucked.  I got mostly A's but was bored to death.  I was embarassed to tell my friends that I made the top grade for the curve and would lie about my grades to them.  Why should anyone be ashamed of good grades.

3. Too much wasted time in schools, too many teachers telling kids to be quiet and focusing on teaching kids that should know the material, had they just done their work.

4. Homework for the sake of homework.  Once you know it, lets freaking move on

5. My kids are crazy active, they'd be labeled and the push for drugging them would start.

6. Selective vaccination

7. Too much focus on sports

8.  I want my kids to be raised by me, not other kids

9. Stupid rules

10. I don't trust most adults to do their job and take a personal interest in my child

bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Nov. 8, 2013 at 5:28 PM

 My oldest went to PS for a year and a half.  He would get sick and vomit before his Thursday spelling tests, he would pee his pants on the hour busride home due to utter exhaustion, the school refused to create goals for children who were above benchmark in the annual testing, my son was bullied over his lunches because vegetables are not "normal" and smell yucky (and that was the teacher's response), when a handfull of kids were talking the teacher decided to punish them all with no recess, he was labelled "chatty" because he would get bored waiting for the other 20 kids to get up to speed on a lesson, his bus came to pick him up at 7:20 and dropped him off at 4:30 making a 9 hour day, the homework was silly busy-work crap and the teacher never sent home enough instructions for us to do it "right," he was given reading assignments that were far below his ability level because "that's what first graders read," and the library would only allow kids to check out books that were at or below thei grade level until they could be level tested in THIRD GRADE! 

And that is just the short list!

hipmomto3
by Bronze Member on Nov. 8, 2013 at 5:34 PM

This for me, too. When my first child was born in 2003, I remember realizing that in 2008 she'd be starting kindergarten, and that just seemed way too soon to be sending my 'baby' out into the world on her own. So I think the thought started at that point. I am a teacher by profession, so even when I stopped working to be full-time mommy (when she was a toddler), we still did outside time, library visits, story hour, arts and crafts etc at home every day. We didn't just "do nothing" all day. So the process was never really that we 'started' homeschooling. We've been homeschooling as long as we've been parents. It's just become more structured and planned and expensive as the children get older. ;)


Quoting Leissaintexas:

I just felt it was my job. I didnt have kids to hand them over to other people 7 hours a day every day for 13 years. I also have serious issues with government run programs.



jen2150
by Silver Member on Nov. 8, 2013 at 8:34 PM
I choose homeschooling for the same reason that I decided not to become a teacher. I didn't want to be stuck in the same classroom every day. I wanted them to have choices and freedom. I never wanted them to be told they couldn't study something they wantedto learn. I was literally told I couldn't study a subject in school.
Bleacher-mom
by Member on Nov. 8, 2013 at 11:33 PM
Basiclly, it was because husband works second shift and kids would never get to see him. That's why we started, however, even if he moves to 1st, we would still homeschool.
kmath
by Silver Member on Nov. 8, 2013 at 11:46 PM

Public school and DS didn't fit.  I like having him home with me and he likes being able to learn what he wants to learn at his pace, not the teachers.

Grumpy.Cat
by Member on Nov. 9, 2013 at 2:34 AM

First, I hated school. I look back on my childhood as being deliriously happy and free... except for the hours between 7AM and 4PM on school days. I still feel a lingering disappointment and sadness when I think of school. The sight of a school bus at 7am (when mine are tucked in bed or eating pancakes unhurriedly) still makes me cringe. Sure there were bright spots, friends and a good teacher who inspired me here and there. But mostly it was boredom and misery rolled in one.

My dad desperately wanted to homeschool me and raise me in nature rather than captivity. My mother (who did not have much visitation with me and exerted control wherever she could) threatened to drag it into the legal system and that was a time just before homeschooling went mainstream. He had no idea how to proceed and so to avoid dragging me through that, he gave in and basically told me to try and be as happy as possible with the school and we'd learn things worth learning at home. It meant I skipped a lot of school by being mysteriously ill a whole lot, and learned a lot at home ;) My father begged DH and I, even before we had kids, to not send them to school.

We both agreed from the start, before our first was even born, that our children would grow up differently than we did. If we had to live in a van down by the river, so be it, they would have a happy, free childhood unsullied by the tyranny of the educational system or by the inevitable trickle-down of mainstream society and its questionable parenting/"socialization" methods. We would give them two parents who were fully devoted to them, not to managing them for the teacher or being homework checkers and behaviourists.

Over the years additional things have reinforced our convictions. Disdain for the violent and patriarchal culture promoted in schools, not wanting our children exposed to fear and bullying and punishment (from other students and from teachers), having children with different personalities that would probably be reccomended for medication within a week in a classroom rather than appreciated just as they are. Desire to give them a more old-fashioned childhood and a radically new kind of childhood at the same time.

So far, so good. Children want to learn, they really do. They need to, like fish need to swim and flowers need sun. I have faith that if they're exposed to things -- ideas, mediums, opportunities, opinions, experiences -- if they're given freedom and choice and the materials, they'll learn from those, they'll decide for themselves what's good and what works. 

NYCitymomx3
by Bronze Member on Nov. 9, 2013 at 7:25 AM

In a nutshell, I had a gifted child who was bored, fidgety, and chatty.  Catholic school, public school, and a gifted school ended up really being all the same internally.  She made tons of friends, but was always in trouble (this was a kids who taught herself to read and write before she was 3).  In 3rd grade I gave her the option to homeschool, and after 2 weeks of her really thinking about it, she made the decision.  It was going so well, my ds came home the following year for Kindy and my oldest homeschooled for 8th grade. 

I loved having all 3 kids home.  Oldest dd went to a high school for journalism the following year.  Younger dd homeschooled for almost 6 years and auditioned for and was accepted to the big Fame high school in NYC, and ds, who is currently in 7th grade, thinks he may want to continue homeschooling through high school.

No regrets.  I'd make the same decisions in a heart beat.

Mandallyn
by Member on Nov. 9, 2013 at 9:07 AM
My oldest son can't focus on his own as to what's expected in school. He also needs a lot more play time than is available during school, and after school now that the days are shorter and his homework is starting to bulk up. My son has become far less cooperative since he started school, I'm hoping his behavior even outs now that he's home.

My middle son is gender-fluid and highly emotional. Both are bad news for public school, so he'll homeschool until I think he's ready for school, or we can't manage anymore.
QueenAtargatis
by on Nov. 9, 2013 at 9:14 AM
1 mom liked this
This is beautifully expressed, mama. My reasons fall exactly in line with everything you've said.

Quoting Grumpy.Cat:

First, I hated school. I look back on my childhood as being deliriously happy and free... except for the hours between 7AM and 4PM on school days. I still feel a lingering disappointment and sadness when I think of school. The sight of a school bus at 7am (when mine are tucked in bed or eating pancakes unhurriedly) still makes me cringe. Sure there were bright spots, friends and a good teacher who inspired me here and there. But mostly it was boredom and misery rolled in one.

My dad desperately wanted to homeschool me and raise me in nature rather than captivity. My mother (who did not have much visitation with me and exerted control wherever she could) threatened to drag it into the legal system and that was a time just before homeschooling went mainstream. He had no idea how to proceed and so to avoid dragging me through that, he gave in and basically told me to try and be as happy as possible with the school and we'd learn things worth learning at home. It meant I skipped a lot of school by being mysteriously ill a whole lot, and learned a lot at home ;) My father begged DH and I, even before we had kids, to not send them to school.

We both agreed from the start, before our first was even born, that our children would grow up differently than we did. If we had to live in a van down by the river, so be it, they would have a happy, free childhood unsullied by the tyranny of the educational system or by the inevitable trickle-down of mainstream society and its questionable parenting/"socialization" methods. We would give them two parents who were fully devoted to them, not to managing them for the teacher or being homework checkers and behaviourists.

Over the years additional things have reinforced our convictions. Disdain for the violent and patriarchal culture promoted in schools, not wanting our children exposed to fear and bullying and punishment (from other students and from teachers), having children with different personalities that would probably be reccomended for medication within a week in a classroom rather than appreciated just as they are. Desire to give them a more old-fashioned childhood and a radically new kind of childhood at the same time.

So far, so good. Children want to learn, they really do. They need to, like fish need to swim and flowers need sun. I have faith that if they're exposed to things -- ideas, mediums, opportunities, opinions, experiences -- if they're given freedom and choice and the materials, they'll learn from those, they'll decide for themselves what's good and what works. 

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