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Untold History

Posted by on Nov. 9, 2013 at 3:07 PM
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I use to think history was boring, and it was taught that way...you know, memorizing dates.  But real history is so much more, and the elderly are the greatest resources.  The Indians valued the wisdom of the elders, but in today's split families, that history is being lost.

The other day a 90 year old friend began telling me that her family had come from Ireland, and they told her  stores that I had never heard.  She began telling me that her Grandfather escaped to England during Great Potato Famine  that began in 1845.  He found the British people most compassionate, and became very pro-British.

On his grandmothers advice, her grandfather moved to America, and brought his starving family from Ireland.  They were very anti-British.  Her relatives said there was plenty of food (cattle, and other crops besides potatoes)  in Ireland during the famine that killed 750,00 people.  But only the British colonialists were allowed such food,

Her Grandfather told her that there was a volcanic eruption that darkened the skies creating an unusually wet and cold climate. He said it  caused the potato blight that destroyed the poor people's food supply.

This was not the story I had heard.  But I have learned not to dismiss such stories too lightly.  I had learned a great deal  from the stories passed down from Indians, Mexicans and blacks.  So I began some research, and too my amazement I found the following.  I have not yet researched the entirety of the documents, but there was much truth in what this ladies family passed down to her. 

Despite  the famine , corn, barley , and dairy products were exported from Ireland to Britain in compliance with  British control  that called colonialism free trade. The Great Famine Of 1845

Livestock was also exported from Ireland  Quick History: The Irish Potato Famine.

I continued to search for the volcanic eruption that her grandfather talked about, and so far have only found this little known history:  The Year Without A Summer (Mini Ice Age)

As I researched more about colonialism, I discovered this.  "Eventually Venice,  Amsterdam , and England all adopted central banks. These banks helped pay for unnecessary wars, unprofitable colonies, and to expand the state at home.  Eventually all of these central banks resulted in economic crises and devaluation.  Meanwhile, the United States remained free of such central banking in the nineteenth century, and  became the world's economic superpower.  We only began to experience the growth of government,  continental wars, and expanding colonial empire, and skyrocketing national debt when the Federal Reserve was found in 1913.  The pace of change accelerated when the final break from the gold standard occurred in 1971."    The Fed's War On The Middle Class

Now this is why real history is so important, and why what we are taught in modern textbooks is so worthless. 


by on Nov. 9, 2013 at 3:07 PM
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debramommyof4
by Silver Member on Nov. 9, 2013 at 3:16 PM
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 It is like the Civil War.  There are so many wrong facts about that that it is not funny.  But no one teaches it. 

jen2150
by Silver Member on Nov. 9, 2013 at 3:32 PM
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I have been enjoying the book Lies My Teacher Told Me. One reason we like to use living books in history. :-)
kirbymom
by Sonja on Nov. 10, 2013 at 12:16 AM
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Those who don't know History are doomed to repeat it...until they do know it. Sad but true.

I love this post Roma! Thanks for posting it!
PurpleCupcake
by Cynthia on Nov. 10, 2013 at 7:32 AM
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That kind of stuff is in history books.....BUT it is sooooooo watered down. Usually, you can get through it really quick. 

I'm a firm believer that history needs to be brought to life in some way...documentaries, field trips, movies things like that. 

PurpleCupcake
by Cynthia on Nov. 10, 2013 at 7:33 AM
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That stuff about Christopher Columbus was mind blowing! We were taught that he was some kind of hero...but really he was a bad guy. 

Quoting jen2150:

I have been enjoying the book Lies My Teacher Told Me. One reason we like to use living books in history. :-)

















elizabooks
by Member on Nov. 10, 2013 at 10:22 AM
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Umm. What? Where and when did you go to school? I was in PS in the 1980s in NC and I learned all of that.  It was all in the textbooks and we discussed it. 7th grade history I believe.

Every section of the textbooks we used had a list at the end that gave suggested readings on the topics for more detailed information. The AP teachers graded you on what was in them, the regular teachers just insisted you read one of them.

But I agree that elders have different views of historical events that can help broaden the information found in the classroom.

One of my great aunts (we had many that were not blood related) was the bane of the shoe stores as she could look at the shoes and tell you how long it would take to wear out the souls.  After ten trips with her to the shops (and she was right every time) I finally asked her how she knew this as she taught painting to young women and had been a gardener for most of her life.  I was 8 at the time. She sat me down and told me about how she came to this country from Armenia. Her older sister had argued with their father about the political situation and when they were all being removed from their homes the two girls packed their bags, doubled their clothes and stole two horses and escaped in the chaos. (her sister was 16.) they rode and then, when the horses died, stole more or walked over 900 miles. Got to Italy, somehow managed to get a job on a luxury liner to Britain and then stayed for a year trying to earn money for passage to the US. Her sister died on the ocean crossing and she was rejected due to health reasons and returned  to Britain. Took another two years to earn passage into Canada and then she crossed the border into NY.  She became a legal citizen after WWII. 

So from all of the walking she could tell just how long a certain material would last.... She romantazied it a lot, but her tales of hiding from solders for hours watching the death marches was very chilling. At one point the sisters had come across information about relief workers and aid from Europe for Armenians, but by that point they had become so paraniod they wouldn't even trust the news.

So yes, talking to elders will help flesh out the history, but don't dismiss textbooks because you didn't come across ones with a lot of information.


jen2150
by Silver Member on Nov. 10, 2013 at 2:33 PM
1 mom liked this
I can't speak on this historical topic but history textbooks in general are filled with many errors. Sadly our public schools in MI are horrible. They still teach that Marconi invented the radio. I never heard Tesla mentioned in school. I did not receive any quality history instruction till I hit high school and we didn't use textbooks. It was a private academy. Sounds like the public schools in NC were a lot better than what I grew up with.
Quoting elizabooks:

Umm. What? Where and when did you go to school? I was in PS in the 1980s in NC and I learned all of that.  It was all in the textbooks and we discussed it. 7th grade history I believe.

Every section of the textbooks we used had a list at the end that gave suggested readings on the topics for more detailed information. The AP teachers graded you on what was in them, the regular teachers just insisted you read one of them.

But I agree that elders have different views of historical events that can help broaden the information found in the classroom.

One of my great aunts (we had many that were not blood related) was the bane of the shoe stores as she could look at the shoes and tell you how long it would take to wear out the souls.  After ten trips with her to the shops (and she was right every time) I finally asked her how she knew this as she taught painting to young women and had been a gardener for most of her life.  I was 8 at the time. She sat me down and told me about how she came to this country from Armenia. Her older sister had argued with their father about the political situation and when they were all being removed from their homes the two girls packed their bags, doubled their clothes and stole two horses and escaped in the chaos. (her sister was 16.) they rode and then, when the horses died, stole more or walked over 900 miles. Got to Italy, somehow managed to get a job on a luxury liner to Britain and then stayed for a year trying to earn money for passage to the US. Her sister died on the ocean crossing and she was rejected due to health reasons and returned  to Britain. Took another two years to earn passage into Canada and then she crossed the border into NY.  She became a legal citizen after WWII. 

So from all of the walking she could tell just how long a certain material would last.... She romantazied it a lot, but her tales of hiding from solders for hours watching the death marches was very chilling. At one point the sisters had come across information about relief workers and aid from Europe for Armenians, but by that point they had become so paraniod they wouldn't even trust the news.

So yes, talking to elders will help flesh out the history, but don't dismiss textbooks because you didn't come across ones with a lot of information.



romacox
by Silver Member on Nov. 10, 2013 at 2:51 PM

 

Here is a story passed down by the Mexicans ---- Mexicans were instrumental in bringing Arizona and California into the Union. They were very successful and wealthy land owners there (owned large ranches, vineyards).

After those States entered the Union the Mexicans were highly respected, and held public office for many years. But once gold was found, things changed. You see most of the land was owned by Indians and Mexicans . So, for the white Americans to obtain the gold ridden land they declared that if one had one drop of Indian blood in him he could not testify against a white man.

Juan Muretta owned a good gold producing mine, and some white men waited for him to leave his property to sell some gold. They then raided his home, raped his wife, and took possession of his land. He went to his friend, the Sheriff for help. The sheriff told him there was nothing he could do as a Mexican because he could not testify against these white men.

Juan took revenge, and became a "Mexican Robin Hood", stealing from the rich white man, an giving to the once wealthy Mexicans who were now poor because their property had been taken in the name of Gold. Juan organized a gang of men, and several of them carried the name Juan. These different Juans would rob in various places at the same time. So when the authorities would ask the Mexicans, who did it, they replied, Juan did it? So for a long time, the authorities thought all these Juans were Juan Muretta. That, my friend, gave rise to the Legend of Zoro. Today this story is told among the Mexicans who hold Muretta as a hero. But our history writes him up as a bandit. The winners write the history books.

Quoting PurpleCupcake:

That stuff about Christopher Columbus was mind blowing! We were taught that he was some kind of hero...but really he was a bad guy. 

Quoting jen2150:

I have been enjoying the book Lies My Teacher Told Me. One reason we like to use living books in history. :-)



 

jen2150
by Silver Member on Nov. 10, 2013 at 3:56 PM
1 mom liked this
Thanks for sharing. You just gave me a new idea for our next history study.


Quoting romacox:

 


Here is a story passed down by the Mexicans ---- Mexicans were instrumental in bringing Arizona and California into the Union. They were very successful and wealthy land owners there (owned large ranches, vineyards).


After those States entered the Union the Mexicans were highly respected, and held public office for many years. But once gold was found, things changed. You see most of the land was owned by Indians and Mexicans . So, for the white Americans to obtain the gold ridden land they declared that if one had one drop of Indian blood in him he could not testify against a white man.

Juan Muretta owned a good gold producing mine, and some white men waited for him to leave his property to sell some gold. They then raided his home, raped his wife, and took possession of his land. He went to his friend, the Sheriff for help. The sheriff told him there was nothing he could do as a Mexican because he could not testify against these white men.


Juan took revenge, and became a "Mexican Robin Hood", stealing from the rich white man, an giving to the once wealthy Mexicans who were now poor because their property had been taken in the name of Gold. Juan organized a gang of men, and several of them carried the name Juan. These different Juans would rob in various places at the same time. So when the authorities would ask the Mexicans, who did it, they replied, Juan did it? So for a long time, the authorities thought all these Juans were Juan Muretta. That, my friend, gave rise to the Legend of Zoro. Today this story is told among the Mexicans who hold Muretta as a hero. But our history writes him up as a bandit. The winners write the history books.


Quoting PurpleCupcake:


That stuff about Christopher Columbus was mind blowing! We were taught that he was some kind of hero...but really he was a bad guy. 


Quoting jen2150:

I have been enjoying the book Lies My Teacher Told Me. One reason we like to use living books in history. :-)





 


romacox
by Silver Member on Nov. 10, 2013 at 6:45 PM

I am so delighted Jen2150, that I could help.  Following is a link about one of those early Mexicans who served in the Arizona legislature:  Jose Maria Redando. You might find it useful also


Quoting jen2150:

Thanks for sharing. You just gave me a new idea for our next history study.


Quoting romacox:



Here is a story passed down by the Mexicans ---- Mexicans were instrumental in bringing Arizona and California into the Union. They were very successful and wealthy land owners there (owned large ranches, vineyards).


After those States entered the Union the Mexicans were highly respected, and held public office for many years. But once gold was found, things changed. You see most of the land was owned by Indians and Mexicans . So, for the white Americans to obtain the gold ridden land they declared that if one had one drop of Indian blood in him he could not testify against a white man.

Juan Muretta owned a good gold producing mine, and some white men waited for him to leave his property to sell some gold. They then raided his home, raped his wife, and took possession of his land. He went to his friend, the Sheriff for help. The sheriff told him there was nothing he could do as a Mexican because he could not testify against these white men.


Juan took revenge, and became a "Mexican Robin Hood", stealing from the rich white man, an giving to the once wealthy Mexicans who were now poor because their property had been taken in the name of Gold. Juan organized a gang of men, and several of them carried the name Juan. These different Juans would rob in various places at the same time. So when the authorities would ask the Mexicans, who did it, they replied, Juan did it? So for a long time, the authorities thought all these Juans were Juan Muretta. That, my friend, gave rise to the Legend of Zoro. Today this story is told among the Mexicans who hold Muretta as a hero. But our history writes him up as a bandit. The winners write the history books.


Quoting PurpleCupcake:


That stuff about Christopher Columbus was mind blowing! We were taught that he was some kind of hero...but really he was a bad guy. 


Quoting jen2150:

I have been enjoying the book Lies My Teacher Told Me. One reason we like to use living books in history. :-)









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