Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

Did you know...*Wordy, I apologize.*

Posted by   + Show Post

Is it ok to mention things my boys have accomplished since being homeschooled? I'm so proud of how far they have come since I took them out of that nasty public school. I won't say a word until I get a green light. :) 

No for the "Also" part of my title.  Thomas Edison didn't speak until he was nearly four years old. With that he was also an extremely hyper active boy. At the age of seven, his mother was told that her son was "unlearnable" because he couldn't sit still long enough to concentrate on his studies. So she took him out of school and homeschooled him. She made much more progress teaching him at home than the teachers had the patience for in school. Apparently he was not only ADHD (as we put it now a days) but he was also mildly dyslexic. 

Did any of that stop him? No, infact he was deemed a genius years later. He had an imagination that inevidably led him down the path of success. He is now one of the most revered scientists this country has ever known. 

Einstein didn't speak until he was 4 either, and was known to have epilepsy. Did that stop him after he was deemed "unlearnable"? NO! He's one of the most popular geniuses in all of history. He too was dyslexic, and struggled with a bit of dyscalcula as well. Yet he turned out to be again a most revered physisist (omg I'm still not sure that is spelled just right looks funny to me :p) 

But intelligence does not stop with just school work. Take Beetoven for instance. He was the 8th child of a woman who had syphulys (again, sp lost my glasses) and his 7 other siblings were either deaf or blind. I think maybe one of them was both but don't quote me on that. He is one of history's most world renowned composors. He taught himself to play the piano and he always played barefoot so as to feel the vibrations through the floor as he played. Who doesn't think Moon light sonata or Fur Elise, or even the 5th isn't beautiful?

Those are just a few historical tid bits, but there are dozens more out there. Probably from way farther back in time than these gentlemen mentioned above.

So I am not going to go out and say that EVERY child whith speech or learning delays or disablities is going to be a genius and some how make an imapact on the world, but I will say that it's always a possibility. 

I have sons like these men. My oldest has speech and dexterity and some attention problems, but he's sharp as a tack, and quick to grasp things. My youngest is extreme ADHD and I am going to get him diagnosed with Dyslexia and Dyscalcula as well. Though he can't read much at all, he is still extremely smart as far as learning verbally. I'm so proud of them both and hope that one day they find something that excites them and that they excell and become successful men one day. 

sorry for it being so long, I'm a bit long winded tonight and wanted to share something that was at the moment passionate to me. 

by on Nov. 16, 2013 at 1:56 AM
Replies (11-20):
ladyofnight
by Member on Nov. 16, 2013 at 11:50 PM

Mobile Photo

This is how they learned 3 and 4 didget subtraction. Less borrowing neater papers.
debramommyof4
by Silver Member on Nov. 16, 2013 at 11:52 PM
That's awesome.

Quoting ladyofnight:

Mobile Photo

This is how they learned 3 and 4 didget subtraction. Less borrowing neater papers.
ladyofnight
by Member on Nov. 17, 2013 at 12:19 AM

Thanks. This is what I did for the answers to grade it by. :) Their hand writing isn't quite so neat lol. 

Quoting debramommyof4:

That's awesome.

Quoting ladyofnight:

Mobile Photo

This is how they learned 3 and 4 didget subtraction. Less borrowing neater papers.


Chasing3
by Bronze Member on Nov. 17, 2013 at 9:47 AM

brag away!

Supposedly my aunt didn't speak until about 4 and when she finally did, the story goes she walked into the kitchen and asked my grandmother to make her a sandwich. And my grandmother was so shocked all she did was stare at her and then make the sandwich!

I've been reading a ton on the link between adhd and learning disabilities that I find on teh web on reputable medical journal websites. There is a lot out there that suggests adhd, and most sepcifically the inattentive type, is completely a symptom of a learning disability or learnign difference and rarely presents independently of a comorbid condition. I suspect my son is mildly dyslexic or at least has a math disability. Still on the fence about paying for private testing as home schooling is working so well for us now. The other shockign thing I find is I've connected with homeschool groups in my area, and the number of us who have pulled a boy out of public elementary is a little shocking. My ds does two clubs - a chess club and an art club -- the chess club is 6 boys, the art club is 12 boys, and none overlap as it's thru two different organizations. We've done a few other classes for homeschoolers and the boys do outnumber the girls in those too. To me it totally confirms that public school setting is pushing out boys (at least more often than girls). Also, my ds has a twin sister who is still in public. They are at the same academic level and their test scores from last year were identical and their reading and math level is the same. But guess who gets rave reviews for bahavior and attentiveness in class and guess which one was singles out as having possible neurological disorders by the school psychologist?? (idoit woman that she is!) Same psychologist told my neighbor her son was the most extreme case of adhd she'd ever seen. Come to find out through private testing he is profoundly dyslexic - no adhd showed up anywhere in the private testing. GO figure. Neighbor hired an attorney to force the school to put him in a specialized program.

GOod luck to you and your boys!

Chasing3
by Bronze Member on Nov. 17, 2013 at 9:54 AM
1 mom liked this

oh - and totally teach them handwriting and cursive!! Have them trace or practice every day. If they can listen to music at the same time, studies show that is good for them. Initially I had my son practice cursive (he was never even taught how to properly form letters in public) and he was so resistant back in Septembet. Now he really looks forward to being able to listen to his music and practice printing and cursive. I've found a dramatic increase in his stamina to sit and do his work, being able to write out a complete sentences in order to produce a grade-level answer! and I credit a lot of it to his improved eye-hand coordination, improved core and arm strength and improved fine motor skill thru handwriting.

kirbymom
by Sonja on Nov. 17, 2013 at 10:48 AM
That is awesome! Please, brag brag brag! This is what our group is here for. We love to hear about our homeschooling experiences. Gives us an excitement and a renewed determination and keeps the flow of ideas going. You are doing a wonderful job.
I especially love that you are not teaching just to grade level but are teaching to intelligence capability as well.
TidewaterClan
by on Nov. 17, 2013 at 11:08 AM

Those are wonderful ideas and congratulations on how well your boys are doing!  My girls would love to create a reading worm.  I never thought of that.  I have a friend whose son didn't speak until he was 4.  He's 15 now and an honor student.  Thanks for all of the information on Einstein, etc.

My third grader (this is our first year home) was slammed with writing, writing, writing at public school and she absolutely hated it.  She almost refused to write at home, so I started off the year with a small fun paragraph about the day.  Here are some fun dates for November, including William Tell day tomorrow.   If the day doesn't have something exciting in it I make up something like "If you could make today a national holiday what would you name it and how would you celebrate?"

She really enjoys that (my older daughter does too), and now we're also combining the regular persuasive, informational, story, etc. types with no problems.

Jlee4249
by Member on Nov. 17, 2013 at 11:32 AM

I didn't know that stuff about Thomas Edison.  Google Jacob Barnett...   I LOVE stories like the ones you listed and the more modern ones:


When Jacob Barnett was 2 years old, he was diagnosed with moderate to severe autism. Doctors told his parents that the boy would likely never talk or read and would probably be forever unable to independently manage basic daily activities like tying his shoe laces.

But they were sorely, extraordinarily mistaken.

Today, Barnett -- now 14 -- is a Master's student, on his way to earning a PhD in quantum physics. According to the BBC, the teen, who boasts an IQ of 170, has already been tipped to one day win the Nobel Prize.

Since enrolling at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) at the age of 10, Barnett has flourished -- astounding his professors, peers and family with his spectacular intelligence.

The teen tutors other college students in subjects like calculus and is a published scientific researcher, with an IQ that is believed to be higher than that of Albert Einstein. In fact, according to a 2011 TIME report, Barnett, who frequently tops his college classes, has asserted that he may one day disprove Einstein's Theory of Relativity. (Watch him explain his genius to 60 minutes' Morley Safer in a 2012 interview in the video above.)

Outside of his rigorous university commitments, Barnett, who has Asperger's Syndrome, is also an entrepreneur and aspiring author

The teen, who, with his family, runs a charity called Jacob's Place for kids on the spectrum, has used his story to raise awareness and dispel myths about autism.

"I'm not supposed to be here at all," he said last year during a TEDx Teen speech about "forgetting what you know" in New York City. "You know, I was told that I wouldn't talk. There's probably a therapist watching who is freaking out right now."


ladyofnight
by Member on Nov. 18, 2013 at 9:44 PM

Wow! That physcologist needs to go back to school and pay closer attention in my opinion. The school's behavioral specialist told me that my 7 year old (who is now 8) was having concentrating and sitting still because of his speech and dexterity problems. I told her that I know my oldest has a mild case of ADD, and she said, "you couldn't possibly understand what that's like, or know the signs of such a disorder." I looked at her and said, "Honey, I DO know what it's like and DO know the signs of ADD since I myself have ADD. Have since I was a child. Right now there's about 20 things going through my head as we speak and I'm carrying on a cohesive conversation with you. Also, did you know I can do dishes, cook dinner, type, talk on the phone and when one task is finished I can start another one almost at the same time. I bounce a lot. Can you do that? WITHOUT burning dinner?" She just looked at me lol. With that I began to tell her that my youngest I do believe is ADHD because when he's not playing and gets in trouble and is placed in time out, the child is vibrating. He cannot even be still in his sleep. BUT, these ignoramouses out there who think they know what's best because they have a degree, tend to disregard us as parents intuition completely. It's infuriating!! 

Quoting Chasing3:

brag away!

Supposedly my aunt didn't speak until about 4 and when she finally did, the story goes she walked into the kitchen and asked my grandmother to make her a sandwich. And my grandmother was so shocked all she did was stare at her and then make the sandwich!

I've been reading a ton on the link between adhd and learning disabilities that I find on teh web on reputable medical journal websites. There is a lot out there that suggests adhd, and most sepcifically the inattentive type, is completely a symptom of a learning disability or learnign difference and rarely presents independently of a comorbid condition. I suspect my son is mildly dyslexic or at least has a math disability. Still on the fence about paying for private testing as home schooling is working so well for us now. The other shockign thing I find is I've connected with homeschool groups in my area, and the number of us who have pulled a boy out of public elementary is a little shocking. My ds does two clubs - a chess club and an art club -- the chess club is 6 boys, the art club is 12 boys, and none overlap as it's thru two different organizations. We've done a few other classes for homeschoolers and the boys do outnumber the girls in those too. To me it totally confirms that public school setting is pushing out boys (at least more often than girls). Also, my ds has a twin sister who is still in public. They are at the same academic level and their test scores from last year were identical and their reading and math level is the same. But guess who gets rave reviews for bahavior and attentiveness in class and guess which one was singles out as having possible neurological disorders by the school psychologist?? (idoit woman that she is!) Same psychologist told my neighbor her son was the most extreme case of adhd she'd ever seen. Come to find out through private testing he is profoundly dyslexic - no adhd showed up anywhere in the private testing. GO figure. Neighbor hired an attorney to force the school to put him in a specialized program.

GOod luck to you and your boys!


ladyofnight
by Member on Nov. 18, 2013 at 9:50 PM

I ABSOLUTELY LOVED THIS!! :)  I've had people ask me if my oldest is slightly autistic because he has a speech problem, and he doesn't look people eye to eye for very long. Maybe just a glance or something. I don't think he is though. He may not have spoken till he was 4, but he's come such a long day. He got a little self conscious one day though. Poor little guy was asked how old he was and when his birthday was and what grade he was in by a waitress. He talks like he has a little bit of a British accent, but still kind of choppy. She said, "I have a newphew who talks just like that, but he's 4." That made my son feel extremely self conscious. I looked at her and smiled and said, "We love the way he talks. He had a slow start with speech, but it makes him completely unique and that much more special to all of us." My poor son smiled at me then was literally quiet the rest of the day. I sat him down and told him not to let people discourage him from talking just because he sounds different. That it makes him different from all the other people in the world and how boring would a world where we are all just a like in every way be? He hasn't stopped talking since. :) This was just a recent occurance too. I love the end of this where he said he was sure there was a therapist watching it probably freaking out. 

Quoting Jlee4249:

I didn't know that stuff about Thomas Edison.  Google Jacob Barnett...   I LOVE stories like the ones you listed and the more modern ones:


When Jacob Barnett was 2 years old, he was diagnosed with moderate to severe autism. Doctors told his parents that the boy would likely never talk or read and would probably be forever unable to independently manage basic daily activities like tying his shoe laces.

But they were sorely, extraordinarily mistaken.

Today, Barnett -- now 14 -- is a Master's student, on his way to earning a PhD in quantum physics. According to the BBC, the teen, who boasts an IQ of 170, has already been tipped to one day win the Nobel Prize.

Since enrolling at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) at the age of 10, Barnett has flourished -- astounding his professors, peers and family with his spectacular intelligence.

The teen tutors other college students in subjects like calculus and is a published scientific researcher, with an IQ that is believed to be higher than that of Albert Einstein. In fact, according to a 2011 TIME report, Barnett, who frequently tops his college classes, has asserted that he may one day disprove Einstein's Theory of Relativity. (Watch him explain his genius to 60 minutes' Morley Safer in a 2012 interview in the video above.)

Outside of his rigorous university commitments, Barnett, who has Asperger's Syndrome, is also an entrepreneur and aspiring author

The teen, who, with his family, runs a charity called Jacob's Place for kids on the spectrum, has used his story to raise awareness and dispel myths about autism.

"I'm not supposed to be here at all," he said last year during a TEDx Teen speech about "forgetting what you know" in New York City. "You know, I was told that I wouldn't talk. There's probably a therapist watching who is freaking out right now."



Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)