Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

waldorf approach and curriculums for home schooling

Posted by on Nov. 19, 2013 at 12:06 AM
  • 33 Replies

does anyone have any personal experience with the waldorf approach to home schooling?  another member told me about a very inexpensive waldorf curriculum online and my oldest sister sent her three kids to a waldorf academy so i have a vague idea of what it is. 


so what are your thought and experiences about the waldorf approach to teaching children? 

by on Nov. 19, 2013 at 12:06 AM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Nov. 19, 2013 at 8:48 AM

I dabbled in it. Eventually I found out that my church disapproves of the curriculum and the methodology works against our faith, so I dropped it, but it wasn't right for us regardless.

Gentle. It's very, gentle. Too gentle, imo. Takes a "better late than early" approach. <---- this is what would have turned me off regardless of faith differences. It isn't that this approach is inherently wrong, of course, but it certainly doesn't mesh with my preferences.

It is very hands on and artsy, if that's your gig.

I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















Boobah
by Nikki :) on Nov. 19, 2013 at 9:18 AM
I love it. My kids love love love it and are thriving. I have seen such amazing, positive changes in them, and in our whole family.
We focus on the rhythm aspect, the doing things together, celebrating the holidays, festivals, seasons. I will be honest, I haven't looked into studying steiners ideals which is what most people have an issue with. We just love the natural and art aspect of it.
As stated in the others posters reply, it does honor childhood by not forcing academics onto children so early. It has been proven that children who are pushed into academics early have deficiencies in other places (gross motor, social, etc). This may not hold true for all, but it does for many if parents really open their eyes and aren't bias. I know my oldest, who began reading just shy if her 4th birthday, has a much harder time with physical activity, is a very nervous, and worried child, and has a much harder time socially.
Though the Waldorf approach is definitely gentle, it is still a very good way of teaching children and they learn all the necessary information - they just learn it when their minds are ready for it and they can fully understand it. In fact, my Waldorf schooled daughter is ahead of her public school peers in math already (she is 8).

Sorry to write a book, I am just SO happy we found this method so early on our journey and I wish I could share it with everyone. I love that I'm able to teach my kids life skills and learn at their developing pace, incorporate art and nature with all we do, celebrate life and the seasons the way it should be. We, as a society, are so out of tune with nature and the seasons and we are paying for it.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
Boobah
by Nikki :) on Nov. 19, 2013 at 9:23 AM
Good websites:
Www.waldorfessentials.com
Www.simplicityparenting.com
Www.frontierdreams.com (blog)
Www.parentingpassageway.com

Good books:
Simplicity parenting by Kim John Payne
Beyond the rainbow bridge - can't remember the author
Seven times the sun
Heaven on earth

Good curriculum:
Journey through Waldorf (this is what I use, super inexpensive)
Christopherus
Enki
BEarth institute
Live education
Oak meadow (not strictly Waldorf, but Waldorf inspired, gentle, and slightly more academic than true Waldorf)

A good guide is the Waldorf homeschool overview by the authors of Christopherus.

I have seen several of these curric, and in my opinion, though they are all much pricier than journey through Waldorf, none of them are better, more complete, or as well laid out. :)
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
-Teeter-Totter-
by on Nov. 19, 2013 at 9:55 AM


I was just about to ask you for your links and favorites regarding it :)

Right now ours are little (2 and almost 4), so we use a mash of things including a weekly waldorf rhythm and mostly play.

We love the calming gentleness of it (at least the crafts, rhythms, stories-we don't apply steiner's thoughts on it).

DH wants me to use something a little more rigorous when they get older, but I think we'll always allow that waldorfy-ness to seep into our days, we enjoy it too much-makes me feel like a kid again!  

Quoting Boobah:

Good websites:
Www.waldorfessentials.com
Www.simplicityparenting.com
Www.frontierdreams.com (blog)
Www.parentingpassageway.com

Good books:
Simplicity parenting by Kim John Payne
Beyond the rainbow bridge - can't remember the author
Seven times the sun
Heaven on earth

Good curriculum:
Journey through Waldorf (this is what I use, super inexpensive)
Christopherus
Enki
BEarth institute
Live education
Oak meadow (not strictly Waldorf, but Waldorf inspired, gentle, and slightly more academic than true Waldorf)

A good guide is the Waldorf homeschool overview by the authors of Christopherus.

I have seen several of these curric, and in my opinion, though they are all much pricier than journey through Waldorf, none of them are better, more complete, or as well laid out. :)



AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Nov. 19, 2013 at 10:01 AM


I would be interested in your sources for this - only because I've seen the opposite (not just personally, but also in studies), stating that children who attend formal pre-k programs fare better socially and with motor skills. On a similar note, my eldest does wonderfully in sports and socially, and started reading early. My 4 year old is learning to read currently, and is quite the social butterfly, lol! I can't speak for his motor skills, because he was born with serious medical issues that have caused delays in that area.

Quoting Boobah:

I love it. My kids love love love it and are thriving. I have seen such amazing, positive changes in them, and in our whole family.
We focus on the rhythm aspect, the doing things together, celebrating the holidays, festivals, seasons. I will be honest, I haven't looked into studying steiners ideals which is what most people have an issue with. We just love the natural and art aspect of it.
As stated in the others posters reply, it does honor childhood by not forcing academics onto children so early. It has been proven that children who are pushed into academics early have deficiencies in other places (gross motor, social, etc). This may not hold true for all, but it does for many if parents really open their eyes and aren't bias. I know my oldest, who began reading just shy if her 4th birthday, has a much harder time with physical activity, is a very nervous, and worried child, and has a much harder time socially.
Though the Waldorf approach is definitely gentle, it is still a very good way of teaching children and they learn all the necessary information - they just learn it when their minds are ready for it and they can fully understand it. In fact, my Waldorf schooled daughter is ahead of her public school peers in math already (she is 8).

Sorry to write a book, I am just SO happy we found this method so early on our journey and I wish I could share it with everyone. I love that I'm able to teach my kids life skills and learn at their developing pace, incorporate art and nature with all we do, celebrate life and the seasons the way it should be. We, as a society, are so out of tune with nature and the seasons and we are paying for it.



I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















Saphira1207
by Member on Nov. 19, 2013 at 10:30 AM

bump!  I'll check out those websites later.  Thanks!


tansyflower
by Member on Nov. 19, 2013 at 10:35 AM

this is the waldorf website that i was recommended.  and yes, her prices are fantastic!  i was thinking about ordering the early years...and the jjourney through waldorf?  by oldest is 3.5 years old so i am not really sure what i should be ordering.  did you order her yearly curriculum's on top of the journey through waldorf?

Quoting -Teeter-Totter-:


I was just about to ask you for your links and favorites regarding it :)

Right now ours are little (2 and almost 4), so we use a mash of things including a weekly waldorf rhythm and mostly play.

We love the calming gentleness of it (at least the crafts, rhythms, stories-we don't apply steiner's thoughts on it).

DH wants me to use something a little more rigorous when they get older, but I think we'll always allow that waldorfy-ness to seep into our days, we enjoy it too much-makes me feel like a kid again!  

Quoting Boobah:

Good websites:
Www.waldorfessentials.com
Www.simplicityparenting.com
Www.frontierdreams.com (blog)
Www.parentingpassageway.com

Good books:
Simplicity parenting by Kim John Payne
Beyond the rainbow bridge - can't remember the author
Seven times the sun
Heaven on earth

Good curriculum:
Journey through Waldorf (this is what I use, super inexpensive)
Christopherus
Enki
BEarth institute
Live education
Oak meadow (not strictly Waldorf, but Waldorf inspired, gentle, and slightly more academic than true Waldorf)

A good guide is the Waldorf homeschool overview by the authors of Christopherus.

I have seen several of these curric, and in my opinion, though they are all much pricier than journey through Waldorf, none of them are better, more complete, or as well laid out. :)




-Teeter-Totter-
by on Nov. 19, 2013 at 10:48 AM


To me, it seems mostly like a case of personality preference on the kid's part.

My mom was against academics before school age (kindergarden age and up), so I wasn't really "taught" specifics like letters or how to read and write before i went to school. I was never denied knowledge, though, and was always encouraged to pursue questions and thoughts. We had a story hour every night. 

She just felt that learning certain things before the age of 5-6 does cause a loss of the "magic" things seem to posess to little ones. An example would be when you look at a something like a car as an adult, is your first thought one of wonder and admiration, or to label it by its make/model, how fast it goes, etc. 

She felt that, unless asked for the information, a child shouldn't be bombarded with having to know such specifics or letters/sounds, etc, and that it definitely shouldnt be forced upon them until after 5 or 6.

I feel that way too, although I leave it up to other parents to decide what they feel is best. 

But I truly believe that those children who pursue academia early on (of their own accord) would do so anyway. That those who tend to be more interested in that stuff are naturally just more inclined to do so, rather than hang out with others or play sports, etc.

I was that child. Even without being taught letters before school, I picked them up very quickly and loved listening to lessons/stories and asking questions about how things worked, rather than interracting with others.

I really think (unless it's a case of serious pushing on the parents' part) that its just the child's preference that leads them to be more academic or social/physical oriented.

Quoting AutymsMommy:


I would be interested in your sources for this - only because I've seen the opposite (not just personally, but also in studies), stating that children who attend formal pre-k programs fare better socially and with motor skills. On a similar note, my eldest does wonderfully in sports and socially, and started reading early. My 4 year old is learning to read currently, and is quite the social butterfly, lol! I can't speak for his motor skills, because he was born with serious medical issues that have caused delays in that area.

Quoting Boobah:

I love it. My kids love love love it and are thriving. I have seen such amazing, positive changes in them, and in our whole family.
We focus on the rhythm aspect, the doing things together, celebrating the holidays, festivals, seasons. I will be honest, I haven't looked into studying steiners ideals which is what most people have an issue with. We just love the natural and art aspect of it.
As stated in the others posters reply, it does honor childhood by not forcing academics onto children so early. It has been proven that children who are pushed into academics early have deficiencies in other places (gross motor, social, etc). This may not hold true for all, but it does for many if parents really open their eyes and aren't bias. I know my oldest, who began reading just shy if her 4th birthday, has a much harder time with physical activity, is a very nervous, and worried child, and has a much harder time socially.
Though the Waldorf approach is definitely gentle, it is still a very good way of teaching children and they learn all the necessary information - they just learn it when their minds are ready for it and they can fully understand it. In fact, my Waldorf schooled daughter is ahead of her public school peers in math already (she is 8).

Sorry to write a book, I am just SO happy we found this method so early on our journey and I wish I could share it with everyone. I love that I'm able to teach my kids life skills and learn at their developing pace, incorporate art and nature with all we do, celebrate life and the seasons the way it should be. We, as a society, are so out of tune with nature and the seasons and we are paying for it.





AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Nov. 19, 2013 at 11:02 AM


Valid... but my children aren't pursuing these things on their own - I'm actively teaching them these things, and they're no worse for wear, lol.

Quoting -Teeter-Totter-:


To me, it seems mostly like a case of personality preference on the kid's part.

My mom was against academics before school age (kindergarden age and up), so I wasn't really "taught" specifics like letters or how to read and write before i went to school. I was never denied knowledge, though, and was always encouraged to pursue questions and thoughts. We had a story hour every night. 

She just felt that learning certain things before the age of 5-6 does cause a loss of the "magic" things seem to posess to little ones. An example would be when you look at a something like a car as an adult, is your first thought one of wonder and admiration, or to label it by its make/model, how fast it goes, etc. 

She felt that, unless asked for the information, a child shouldn't be bombarded with having to know such specifics or letters/sounds, etc, and that it definitely shouldnt be forced upon them until after 5 or 6.

I feel that way too, although I leave it up to other parents to decide what they feel is best. 

But I truly believe that those children who pursue academia early on (of their own accord) would do so anyway. That those who tend to be more interested in that stuff are naturally just more inclined to do so, rather than hang out with others or play sports, etc.

I was that child. Even without being taught letters before school, I picked them up very quickly and loved listening to lessons/stories and asking questions about how things worked, rather than interracting with others.

I really think (unless it's a case of serious pushing on the parents' part) that its just the child's preference that leads them to be more academic or social/physical oriented.

Quoting AutymsMommy:


I would be interested in your sources for this - only because I've seen the opposite (not just personally, but also in studies), stating that children who attend formal pre-k programs fare better socially and with motor skills. On a similar note, my eldest does wonderfully in sports and socially, and started reading early. My 4 year old is learning to read currently, and is quite the social butterfly, lol! I can't speak for his motor skills, because he was born with serious medical issues that have caused delays in that area.

Quoting Boobah:

I love it. My kids love love love it and are thriving. I have seen such amazing, positive changes in them, and in our whole family.
We focus on the rhythm aspect, the doing things together, celebrating the holidays, festivals, seasons. I will be honest, I haven't looked into studying steiners ideals which is what most people have an issue with. We just love the natural and art aspect of it.
As stated in the others posters reply, it does honor childhood by not forcing academics onto children so early. It has been proven that children who are pushed into academics early have deficiencies in other places (gross motor, social, etc). This may not hold true for all, but it does for many if parents really open their eyes and aren't bias. I know my oldest, who began reading just shy if her 4th birthday, has a much harder time with physical activity, is a very nervous, and worried child, and has a much harder time socially.
Though the Waldorf approach is definitely gentle, it is still a very good way of teaching children and they learn all the necessary information - they just learn it when their minds are ready for it and they can fully understand it. In fact, my Waldorf schooled daughter is ahead of her public school peers in math already (she is 8).

Sorry to write a book, I am just SO happy we found this method so early on our journey and I wish I could share it with everyone. I love that I'm able to teach my kids life skills and learn at their developing pace, incorporate art and nature with all we do, celebrate life and the seasons the way it should be. We, as a society, are so out of tune with nature and the seasons and we are paying for it.







I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















Knightquester
by Bronze Member on Nov. 19, 2013 at 11:18 AM

While I like hands on, it's not my thing.  I have a friend that sent her child to Waldorf (now homeschools using their curriculum) and also liked the approach and curriculum they have.

Like a previous poster stated, it does go with a more "late is early" approach, given example it really doesn't push or encourage reading the first so many years a child is using their curriculum.  I taught my girls to read at 4 and my son at 3, and while we did a lot of art and hands-on activities we also learned through other approaches that are more un-Waldorf approaches.

It's basically just a different approach to school your child.  I say if you're interested then try it out and if it works for you stick with it, if not there are many other types of curriculum out there to dabble in.

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)