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waldorf approach and curriculums for home schooling

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does anyone have any personal experience with the waldorf approach to home schooling?  another member told me about a very inexpensive waldorf curriculum online and my oldest sister sent her three kids to a waldorf academy so i have a vague idea of what it is. 


so what are your thought and experiences about the waldorf approach to teaching children? 

by on Nov. 19, 2013 at 12:06 AM
Replies (11-20):
-Teeter-Totter-
by on Nov. 19, 2013 at 11:44 AM


But I trust your judgment with your kiddies, and from your replies wouldn't think you one to make them miserable with it. You sound like you have a great way of making it fun :)

Even having stated my feelings, my DS started asking me to teach him the letters and their sounds at 3 1/2. So, i nabbed the Starfall curriuclum (which we already used for their musical renditions of nursery rhymes-love 'em!)and am playing with that for fun. I mix and match the lessons to our preference, but we're definitely working our way through the alphabet at his pace.  

Some kids are like that, and want to know!

Regarding that scenario, my mom encouraged it and her policy in that instance was letters at 3, sounds at 4, then reading when they're ready. (She did that with my sister-I guess I had no interest in letters just the stories themselves, but definitely had to be taught whether i liked it or not in kindy). 

I guess I was envisioning something more to the effect of parents forcing their 1 and 2 year olds to whiz through flashcards and watch einstein videos or something. I met a mom like that once at a playdate, when I asked what her days were like, she said something to the effect of running through their daily routine of an educational video and half hour of flash card time (our babies were 1 and a half at the time). That just made me really sad :(

Quoting AutymsMommy:


Valid... but my children aren't pursuing these things on their own - I'm actively teaching them these things, and they're no worse for wear, lol.

Quoting -Teeter-Totter-:


To me, it seems mostly like a case of personality preference on the kid's part.

My mom was against academics before school age (kindergarden age and up), so I wasn't really "taught" specifics like letters or how to read and write before i went to school. I was never denied knowledge, though, and was always encouraged to pursue questions and thoughts. We had a story hour every night. 

She just felt that learning certain things before the age of 5-6 does cause a loss of the "magic" things seem to posess to little ones. An example would be when you look at a something like a car as an adult, is your first thought one of wonder and admiration, or to label it by its make/model, how fast it goes, etc. 

She felt that, unless asked for the information, a child shouldn't be bombarded with having to know such specifics or letters/sounds, etc, and that it definitely shouldnt be forced upon them until after 5 or 6.

I feel that way too, although I leave it up to other parents to decide what they feel is best. 

But I truly believe that those children who pursue academia early on (of their own accord) would do so anyway. That those who tend to be more interested in that stuff are naturally just more inclined to do so, rather than hang out with others or play sports, etc.

I was that child. Even without being taught letters before school, I picked them up very quickly and loved listening to lessons/stories and asking questions about how things worked, rather than interracting with others.

I really think (unless it's a case of serious pushing on the parents' part) that its just the child's preference that leads them to be more academic or social/physical oriented.

Quoting AutymsMommy:


I would be interested in your sources for this - only because I've seen the opposite (not just personally, but also in studies), stating that children who attend formal pre-k programs fare better socially and with motor skills. On a similar note, my eldest does wonderfully in sports and socially, and started reading early. My 4 year old is learning to read currently, and is quite the social butterfly, lol! I can't speak for his motor skills, because he was born with serious medical issues that have caused delays in that area.

Quoting Boobah:

I love it. My kids love love love it and are thriving. I have seen such amazing, positive changes in them, and in our whole family.
We focus on the rhythm aspect, the doing things together, celebrating the holidays, festivals, seasons. I will be honest, I haven't looked into studying steiners ideals which is what most people have an issue with. We just love the natural and art aspect of it.
As stated in the others posters reply, it does honor childhood by not forcing academics onto children so early. It has been proven that children who are pushed into academics early have deficiencies in other places (gross motor, social, etc). This may not hold true for all, but it does for many if parents really open their eyes and aren't bias. I know my oldest, who began reading just shy if her 4th birthday, has a much harder time with physical activity, is a very nervous, and worried child, and has a much harder time socially.
Though the Waldorf approach is definitely gentle, it is still a very good way of teaching children and they learn all the necessary information - they just learn it when their minds are ready for it and they can fully understand it. In fact, my Waldorf schooled daughter is ahead of her public school peers in math already (she is 8).

Sorry to write a book, I am just SO happy we found this method so early on our journey and I wish I could share it with everyone. I love that I'm able to teach my kids life skills and learn at their developing pace, incorporate art and nature with all we do, celebrate life and the seasons the way it should be. We, as a society, are so out of tune with nature and the seasons and we are paying for it.









tansyflower
by Member on Nov. 19, 2013 at 12:10 PM

my sister is a teacher and HATES "my baby can read" or whatever that infomercial program on tv was that they were selling to parents for their infants.  the goal of reading is comprehension, and while you might be able to teach a small baby what a word looks like and to recite it, it is meaningless if they dont comprehend what it means. it also hurts them later on because they essentially skipped all the phonics prep.  there is no reason that a one year old has to be able to read period.

Quoting -Teeter-Totter-:


But I trust your judgment with your kiddies, and from your replies wouldn't think you one to make them miserable with it. You sound like you have a great way of making it fun :)

Even having stated my feelings, my DS started asking me to teach him the letters and their sounds at 3 1/2. So, i nabbed the Starfall curriuclum (which we already used for their musical renditions of nursery rhymes-love 'em!)and am playing with that for fun. I mix and match the lessons to our preference, but we're definitely working our way through the alphabet at his pace.  

Some kids are like that, and want to know!

Regarding that scenario, my mom encouraged it and her policy in that instance was letters at 3, sounds at 4, then reading when they're ready. (She did that with my sister-I guess I had no interest in letters just the stories themselves, but definitely had to be taught whether i liked it or not in kindy). 

I guess I was envisioning something more to the effect of parents forcing their 1 and 2 year olds to whiz through flashcards and watch einstein videos or something. I met a mom like that once at a playdate, when I asked what her days were like, she said something to the effect of running through their daily routine of an educational video and half hour of flash card time (our babies were 1 and a half at the time). That just made me really sad :(

Quoting AutymsMommy:


Valid... but my children aren't pursuing these things on their own - I'm actively teaching them these things, and they're no worse for wear, lol.

Quoting -Teeter-Totter-:


To me, it seems mostly like a case of personality preference on the kid's part.

My mom was against academics before school age (kindergarden age and up), so I wasn't really "taught" specifics like letters or how to read and write before i went to school. I was never denied knowledge, though, and was always encouraged to pursue questions and thoughts. We had a story hour every night. 

She just felt that learning certain things before the age of 5-6 does cause a loss of the "magic" things seem to posess to little ones. An example would be when you look at a something like a car as an adult, is your first thought one of wonder and admiration, or to label it by its make/model, how fast it goes, etc. 

She felt that, unless asked for the information, a child shouldn't be bombarded with having to know such specifics or letters/sounds, etc, and that it definitely shouldnt be forced upon them until after 5 or 6.

I feel that way too, although I leave it up to other parents to decide what they feel is best. 

But I truly believe that those children who pursue academia early on (of their own accord) would do so anyway. That those who tend to be more interested in that stuff are naturally just more inclined to do so, rather than hang out with others or play sports, etc.

I was that child. Even without being taught letters before school, I picked them up very quickly and loved listening to lessons/stories and asking questions about how things worked, rather than interracting with others.

I really think (unless it's a case of serious pushing on the parents' part) that its just the child's preference that leads them to be more academic or social/physical oriented.

Quoting AutymsMommy:


I would be interested in your sources for this - only because I've seen the opposite (not just personally, but also in studies), stating that children who attend formal pre-k programs fare better socially and with motor skills. On a similar note, my eldest does wonderfully in sports and socially, and started reading early. My 4 year old is learning to read currently, and is quite the social butterfly, lol! I can't speak for his motor skills, because he was born with serious medical issues that have caused delays in that area.

Quoting Boobah:

I love it. My kids love love love it and are thriving. I have seen such amazing, positive changes in them, and in our whole family.
We focus on the rhythm aspect, the doing things together, celebrating the holidays, festivals, seasons. I will be honest, I haven't looked into studying steiners ideals which is what most people have an issue with. We just love the natural and art aspect of it.
As stated in the others posters reply, it does honor childhood by not forcing academics onto children so early. It has been proven that children who are pushed into academics early have deficiencies in other places (gross motor, social, etc). This may not hold true for all, but it does for many if parents really open their eyes and aren't bias. I know my oldest, who began reading just shy if her 4th birthday, has a much harder time with physical activity, is a very nervous, and worried child, and has a much harder time socially.
Though the Waldorf approach is definitely gentle, it is still a very good way of teaching children and they learn all the necessary information - they just learn it when their minds are ready for it and they can fully understand it. In fact, my Waldorf schooled daughter is ahead of her public school peers in math already (she is 8).

Sorry to write a book, I am just SO happy we found this method so early on our journey and I wish I could share it with everyone. I love that I'm able to teach my kids life skills and learn at their developing pace, incorporate art and nature with all we do, celebrate life and the seasons the way it should be. We, as a society, are so out of tune with nature and the seasons and we are paying for it.










AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Nov. 19, 2013 at 12:38 PM

Depends on how you do flashcards, lol.

At around 18 months old, there is nothing my now 4 year old loved more than me throwing flashcards on the ground and asking him to "hop on green", "pick up blue", "tiptoe to red", and then throw them in the air, lol.

I'll admit, I push academics early - regardless of them showing an interest. Do I keep the presentation developmentally appropriate? You betcha. I would never, in a million years, expect a 1, 2, or even 3 year old to sit still for drills. Even now, at 4 with my middle child, I don't expect it for more than 5 minutes at a time (tops_... but, at the same time, academics are non-negotiable at 4 years old - for us, right now. Nico actually just finished math for the day, which he wasn't entirely keen on doing at first... until I asked him if his stuffed Mario wanted in on the fun and brought out the new addition mat I made for him :P He's a sucker for games.

And you're kind for saying that I sound like I make things fun. I actually don't - I suck at that. I'm more of a textbook/workbook kind of gal. I get away with that because what I *am* is silly. I can make potty noises during phonics drills with the best of them, and to my 4 year old "very boy" - that's as fun as anything else.

I don't think you, your mom, or anyone else taking a more gentle approach is wrong on any level - it just isn't for me and, frankly, the studies mean nothing to me, as I've seen a million studies saying the opposite. I take all of these "studies" with a grain of salt and just... ride my own tide, lol!


Quoting -Teeter-Totter-:


But I trust your judgment with your kiddies, and from your replies wouldn't think you one to make them miserable with it. You sound like you have a great way of making it fun :)

Even having stated my feelings, my DS started asking me to teach him the letters and their sounds at 3 1/2. So, i nabbed the Starfall curriuclum (which we already used for their musical renditions of nursery rhymes-love 'em!)and am playing with that for fun. I mix and match the lessons to our preference, but we're definitely working our way through the alphabet at his pace.  

Some kids are like that, and want to know!

Regarding that scenario, my mom encouraged it and her policy in that instance was letters at 3, sounds at 4, then reading when they're ready. (She did that with my sister-I guess I had no interest in letters just the stories themselves, but definitely had to be taught whether i liked it or not in kindy). 

I guess I was envisioning something more to the effect of parents forcing their 1 and 2 year olds to whiz through flashcards and watch einstein videos or something. I met a mom like that once at a playdate, when I asked what her days were like, she said something to the effect of running through their daily routine of an educational video and half hour of flash card time (our babies were 1 and a half at the time). That just made me really sad :(

Quoting AutymsMommy:


Valid... but my children aren't pursuing these things on their own - I'm actively teaching them these things, and they're no worse for wear, lol.

Quoting -Teeter-Totter-:


To me, it seems mostly like a case of personality preference on the kid's part.

My mom was against academics before school age (kindergarden age and up), so I wasn't really "taught" specifics like letters or how to read and write before i went to school. I was never denied knowledge, though, and was always encouraged to pursue questions and thoughts. We had a story hour every night. 

She just felt that learning certain things before the age of 5-6 does cause a loss of the "magic" things seem to posess to little ones. An example would be when you look at a something like a car as an adult, is your first thought one of wonder and admiration, or to label it by its make/model, how fast it goes, etc. 

She felt that, unless asked for the information, a child shouldn't be bombarded with having to know such specifics or letters/sounds, etc, and that it definitely shouldnt be forced upon them until after 5 or 6.

I feel that way too, although I leave it up to other parents to decide what they feel is best. 

But I truly believe that those children who pursue academia early on (of their own accord) would do so anyway. That those who tend to be more interested in that stuff are naturally just more inclined to do so, rather than hang out with others or play sports, etc.

I was that child. Even without being taught letters before school, I picked them up very quickly and loved listening to lessons/stories and asking questions about how things worked, rather than interracting with others.

I really think (unless it's a case of serious pushing on the parents' part) that its just the child's preference that leads them to be more academic or social/physical oriented.

Quoting AutymsMommy:


I would be interested in your sources for this - only because I've seen the opposite (not just personally, but also in studies), stating that children who attend formal pre-k programs fare better socially and with motor skills. On a similar note, my eldest does wonderfully in sports and socially, and started reading early. My 4 year old is learning to read currently, and is quite the social butterfly, lol! I can't speak for his motor skills, because he was born with serious medical issues that have caused delays in that area.

Quoting Boobah:

I love it. My kids love love love it and are thriving. I have seen such amazing, positive changes in them, and in our whole family.
We focus on the rhythm aspect, the doing things together, celebrating the holidays, festivals, seasons. I will be honest, I haven't looked into studying steiners ideals which is what most people have an issue with. We just love the natural and art aspect of it.
As stated in the others posters reply, it does honor childhood by not forcing academics onto children so early. It has been proven that children who are pushed into academics early have deficiencies in other places (gross motor, social, etc). This may not hold true for all, but it does for many if parents really open their eyes and aren't bias. I know my oldest, who began reading just shy if her 4th birthday, has a much harder time with physical activity, is a very nervous, and worried child, and has a much harder time socially.
Though the Waldorf approach is definitely gentle, it is still a very good way of teaching children and they learn all the necessary information - they just learn it when their minds are ready for it and they can fully understand it. In fact, my Waldorf schooled daughter is ahead of her public school peers in math already (she is 8).

Sorry to write a book, I am just SO happy we found this method so early on our journey and I wish I could share it with everyone. I love that I'm able to teach my kids life skills and learn at their developing pace, incorporate art and nature with all we do, celebrate life and the seasons the way it should be. We, as a society, are so out of tune with nature and the seasons and we are paying for it.











I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















-Teeter-Totter-
by on Nov. 19, 2013 at 1:39 PM
1 mom liked this


I agree. I think my mom and I both about died laughing when we saw the advertising for that. Even my husband who is very academically oriented, and often jokingly teases me about why our babies don't know physics yet, snorted at the thought.

His response was "Why don't they just come up with some way to teach everything to babies in the womb, so they can walk outta there with a PHD?"

I agree with wanting to teach your kiddies (as early as humanly possible even-not my thing, but I get it ) but that's just craziness.  

Oh! I have a link for you! I stumbled on this site about a month ago. Very sweet and cute! Its a free waldorf-inspired kindy curriculum:

http://weefolkart.com/content/homeschool-companion-guides



Quoting tansyflower:

my sister is a teacher and HATES "my baby can read" or whatever that infomercial program on tv was that they were selling to parents for their infants.  the goal of reading is comprehension, and while you might be able to teach a small baby what a word looks like and to recite it, it is meaningless if they dont comprehend what it means. it also hurts them later on because they essentially skipped all the phonics prep.  there is no reason that a one year old has to be able to read period.

Quoting -Teeter-Totter-:


But I trust your judgment with your kiddies, and from your replies wouldn't think you one to make them miserable with it. You sound like you have a great way of making it fun :)

Even having stated my feelings, my DS started asking me to teach him the letters and their sounds at 3 1/2. So, i nabbed the Starfall curriuclum (which we already used for their musical renditions of nursery rhymes-love 'em!)and am playing with that for fun. I mix and match the lessons to our preference, but we're definitely working our way through the alphabet at his pace.  

Some kids are like that, and want to know!

Regarding that scenario, my mom encouraged it and her policy in that instance was letters at 3, sounds at 4, then reading when they're ready. (She did that with my sister-I guess I had no interest in letters just the stories themselves, but definitely had to be taught whether i liked it or not in kindy). 

I guess I was envisioning something more to the effect of parents forcing their 1 and 2 year olds to whiz through flashcards and watch einstein videos or something. I met a mom like that once at a playdate, when I asked what her days were like, she said something to the effect of running through their daily routine of an educational video and half hour of flash card time (our babies were 1 and a half at the time). That just made me really sad :(

Quoting AutymsMommy:


Valid... but my children aren't pursuing these things on their own - I'm actively teaching them these things, and they're no worse for wear, lol.

Quoting -Teeter-Totter-:


To me, it seems mostly like a case of personality preference on the kid's part.

My mom was against academics before school age (kindergarden age and up), so I wasn't really "taught" specifics like letters or how to read and write before i went to school. I was never denied knowledge, though, and was always encouraged to pursue questions and thoughts. We had a story hour every night. 

She just felt that learning certain things before the age of 5-6 does cause a loss of the "magic" things seem to posess to little ones. An example would be when you look at a something like a car as an adult, is your first thought one of wonder and admiration, or to label it by its make/model, how fast it goes, etc. 

She felt that, unless asked for the information, a child shouldn't be bombarded with having to know such specifics or letters/sounds, etc, and that it definitely shouldnt be forced upon them until after 5 or 6.

I feel that way too, although I leave it up to other parents to decide what they feel is best. 

But I truly believe that those children who pursue academia early on (of their own accord) would do so anyway. That those who tend to be more interested in that stuff are naturally just more inclined to do so, rather than hang out with others or play sports, etc.

I was that child. Even without being taught letters before school, I picked them up very quickly and loved listening to lessons/stories and asking questions about how things worked, rather than interracting with others.

I really think (unless it's a case of serious pushing on the parents' part) that its just the child's preference that leads them to be more academic or social/physical oriented.

Quoting AutymsMommy:


I would be interested in your sources for this - only because I've seen the opposite (not just personally, but also in studies), stating that children who attend formal pre-k programs fare better socially and with motor skills. On a similar note, my eldest does wonderfully in sports and socially, and started reading early. My 4 year old is learning to read currently, and is quite the social butterfly, lol! I can't speak for his motor skills, because he was born with serious medical issues that have caused delays in that area.

Quoting Boobah:

I love it. My kids love love love it and are thriving. I have seen such amazing, positive changes in them, and in our whole family.
We focus on the rhythm aspect, the doing things together, celebrating the holidays, festivals, seasons. I will be honest, I haven't looked into studying steiners ideals which is what most people have an issue with. We just love the natural and art aspect of it.
As stated in the others posters reply, it does honor childhood by not forcing academics onto children so early. It has been proven that children who are pushed into academics early have deficiencies in other places (gross motor, social, etc). This may not hold true for all, but it does for many if parents really open their eyes and aren't bias. I know my oldest, who began reading just shy if her 4th birthday, has a much harder time with physical activity, is a very nervous, and worried child, and has a much harder time socially.
Though the Waldorf approach is definitely gentle, it is still a very good way of teaching children and they learn all the necessary information - they just learn it when their minds are ready for it and they can fully understand it. In fact, my Waldorf schooled daughter is ahead of her public school peers in math already (she is 8).

Sorry to write a book, I am just SO happy we found this method so early on our journey and I wish I could share it with everyone. I love that I'm able to teach my kids life skills and learn at their developing pace, incorporate art and nature with all we do, celebrate life and the seasons the way it should be. We, as a society, are so out of tune with nature and the seasons and we are paying for it.












-Teeter-Totter-
by on Nov. 19, 2013 at 1:57 PM


Ok, you cannot just say all that cool stuff, then say you aren't fun! :)

And I admit I freaking love how you use flash cards, and never even thought they might be used in that manner!

Man, I was all proud of myself for using the Twister mat for colors. Your idea is cooler ;p

And, although we haven't moved onto worksheets/books yet and probably wont until first grade or so (unless they like it) -I actually love them, too. My mom would pick them up before roadtrips each summer and let us have at it. She was also the type to get those word/logic problem books and do them with us. I have such great memories of them and love them to this day (DH thinks i'm weird ;p). 

And trust me, being a major in biology and education, my mom had very high expectations of us after that "magical" age  LOL. We got our butts kicked into gear once she thought we were ready (even if we didn't think we were), and I am eternally grateful to her for that.

I've always liked drills, too. Have you tried/heard of the math "wraps"? We did those as a kid and they worked wonders for me and I even liked them (hated math).

I do the same regarding "studies".  If there's one thing I've found to be true, it's that no matter what you believe, you can always find a study spinning it your way.

I'm comfy sticking to being an idea thief, and picking the cream of the crop from everything I see.

I thank you kindly for your ideas. I'm definitely going to seek you out in the future for inspiration, if you don't mind!

bow down

edited: corrected embarassing grammar ^_~


Quoting AutymsMommy:

Depends on how you do flashcards, lol.

At around 18 months old, there is nothing my now 4 year old loved more than me throwing flashcards on the ground and asking him to "hop on green", "pick up blue", "tiptoe to red", and then throw them in the air, lol.

I'll admit, I push academics early - regardless of them showing an interest. Do I keep the presentation developmentally appropriate? You betcha. I would never, in a million years, expect a 1, 2, or even 3 year old to sit still for drills. Even now, at 4 with my middle child, I don't expect it for more than 5 minutes at a time (tops_... but, at the same time, academics are non-negotiable at 4 years old - for us, right now. Nico actually just finished math for the day, which he wasn't entirely keen on doing at first... until I asked him if his stuffed Mario wanted in on the fun and brought out the new addition mat I made for him :P He's a sucker for games.

And you're kind for saying that I sound like I make things fun. I actually don't - I suck at that. I'm more of a textbook/workbook kind of gal. I get away with that because what I *am* is silly. I can make potty noises during phonics drills with the best of them, and to my 4 year old "very boy" - that's as fun as anything else.

I don't think you, your mom, or anyone else taking a more gentle approach is wrong on any level - it just isn't for me and, frankly, the studies mean nothing to me, as I've seen a million studies saying the opposite. I take all of these "studies" with a grain of salt and just... ride my own tide, lol!


Quoting -Teeter-Totter-:


But I trust your judgment with your kiddies, and from your replies wouldn't think you one to make them miserable with it. You sound like you have a great way of making it fun :)

Even having stated my feelings, my DS started asking me to teach him the letters and their sounds at 3 1/2. So, i nabbed the Starfall curriuclum (which we already used for their musical renditions of nursery rhymes-love 'em!)and am playing with that for fun. I mix and match the lessons to our preference, but we're definitely working our way through the alphabet at his pace.  

Some kids are like that, and want to know!

Regarding that scenario, my mom encouraged it and her policy in that instance was letters at 3, sounds at 4, then reading when they're ready. (She did that with my sister-I guess I had no interest in letters just the stories themselves, but definitely had to be taught whether i liked it or not in kindy). 

I guess I was envisioning something more to the effect of parents forcing their 1 and 2 year olds to whiz through flashcards and watch einstein videos or something. I met a mom like that once at a playdate, when I asked what her days were like, she said something to the effect of running through their daily routine of an educational video and half hour of flash card time (our babies were 1 and a half at the time). That just made me really sad :(

Quoting AutymsMommy:


Valid... but my children aren't pursuing these things on their own - I'm actively teaching them these things, and they're no worse for wear, lol.

Quoting -Teeter-Totter-:


To me, it seems mostly like a case of personality preference on the kid's part.

My mom was against academics before school age (kindergarden age and up), so I wasn't really "taught" specifics like letters or how to read and write before i went to school. I was never denied knowledge, though, and was always encouraged to pursue questions and thoughts. We had a story hour every night. 

She just felt that learning certain things before the age of 5-6 does cause a loss of the "magic" things seem to posess to little ones. An example would be when you look at a something like a car as an adult, is your first thought one of wonder and admiration, or to label it by its make/model, how fast it goes, etc. 

She felt that, unless asked for the information, a child shouldn't be bombarded with having to know such specifics or letters/sounds, etc, and that it definitely shouldnt be forced upon them until after 5 or 6.

I feel that way too, although I leave it up to other parents to decide what they feel is best. 

But I truly believe that those children who pursue academia early on (of their own accord) would do so anyway. That those who tend to be more interested in that stuff are naturally just more inclined to do so, rather than hang out with others or play sports, etc.

I was that child. Even without being taught letters before school, I picked them up very quickly and loved listening to lessons/stories and asking questions about how things worked, rather than interracting with others.

I really think (unless it's a case of serious pushing on the parents' part) that its just the child's preference that leads them to be more academic or social/physical oriented.

Quoting AutymsMommy:


I would be interested in your sources for this - only because I've seen the opposite (not just personally, but also in studies), stating that children who attend formal pre-k programs fare better socially and with motor skills. On a similar note, my eldest does wonderfully in sports and socially, and started reading early. My 4 year old is learning to read currently, and is quite the social butterfly, lol! I can't speak for his motor skills, because he was born with serious medical issues that have caused delays in that area.

Quoting Boobah:

I love it. My kids love love love it and are thriving. I have seen such amazing, positive changes in them, and in our whole family.
We focus on the rhythm aspect, the doing things together, celebrating the holidays, festivals, seasons. I will be honest, I haven't looked into studying steiners ideals which is what most people have an issue with. We just love the natural and art aspect of it.
As stated in the others posters reply, it does honor childhood by not forcing academics onto children so early. It has been proven that children who are pushed into academics early have deficiencies in other places (gross motor, social, etc). This may not hold true for all, but it does for many if parents really open their eyes and aren't bias. I know my oldest, who began reading just shy if her 4th birthday, has a much harder time with physical activity, is a very nervous, and worried child, and has a much harder time socially.
Though the Waldorf approach is definitely gentle, it is still a very good way of teaching children and they learn all the necessary information - they just learn it when their minds are ready for it and they can fully understand it. In fact, my Waldorf schooled daughter is ahead of her public school peers in math already (she is 8).

Sorry to write a book, I am just SO happy we found this method so early on our journey and I wish I could share it with everyone. I love that I'm able to teach my kids life skills and learn at their developing pace, incorporate art and nature with all we do, celebrate life and the seasons the way it should be. We, as a society, are so out of tune with nature and the seasons and we are paying for it.













-Teeter-Totter-
by on Nov. 19, 2013 at 7:25 PM


I have been absorbing everything I can from that site all day now (we're all a little under the weather today, so we're catching up on Pingu ;p) and I love it!

Thank you so much for the recommend, Boobah!

( and sorry I hijacked your thread Tansyflower...  )embarrassed


It's exactly what I was looking for but hadn't quite found regarding Waldorf (and for such an awesome price compared to what's out there...)

Her samples are great! Think I might try the TFW course for a month and see if its something we'd like to hop into :)


Quoting tansyflower:

this is the waldorf website that i was recommended.  and yes, her prices are fantastic!  i was thinking about ordering the early years...and the jjourney through waldorf?  by oldest is 3.5 years old so i am not really sure what i should be ordering.  did you order her yearly curriculum's on top of the journey through waldorf?

Quoting -Teeter-Totter-:


I was just about to ask you for your links and favorites regarding it :)

Right now ours are little (2 and almost 4), so we use a mash of things including a weekly waldorf rhythm and mostly play.

We love the calming gentleness of it (at least the crafts, rhythms, stories-we don't apply steiner's thoughts on it).

DH wants me to use something a little more rigorous when they get older, but I think we'll always allow that waldorfy-ness to seep into our days, we enjoy it too much-makes me feel like a kid again!  

Quoting Boobah:

Good websites:
Www.waldorfessentials.com
Www.simplicityparenting.com
Www.frontierdreams.com (blog)
Www.parentingpassageway.com

Good books:
Simplicity parenting by Kim John Payne
Beyond the rainbow bridge - can't remember the author
Seven times the sun
Heaven on earth

Good curriculum:
Journey through Waldorf (this is what I use, super inexpensive)
Christopherus
Enki
BEarth institute
Live education
Oak meadow (not strictly Waldorf, but Waldorf inspired, gentle, and slightly more academic than true Waldorf)

A good guide is the Waldorf homeschool overview by the authors of Christopherus.

I have seen several of these curric, and in my opinion, though they are all much pricier than journey through Waldorf, none of them are better, more complete, or as well laid out. :)






tansyflower
by Member on Nov. 19, 2013 at 7:32 PM

lol well i was the one who quoted you instead ofher about the curriculum question lol :)

it does seem like a really fantastic resource doesnt it?!

Quoting -Teeter-Totter-:


I have been absorbing everything I can from that site all day now (we're all a little under the weather today, so we're catching up on Pingu ;p) and I love it!

Thank you so much for the recommend, Boobah!

( and sorry I hijacked your thread Tansyflower...  )embarrassed


It's exactly what I was looking for but hadn't quite found regarding Waldorf (and for such an awesome price compared to what's out there...)

Her samples are great! Think I might try the TFW course for a month and see if its something we'd like to hop into :)


Quoting tansyflower:

this is the waldorf website that i was recommended.  and yes, her prices are fantastic!  i was thinking about ordering the early years...and the jjourney through waldorf?  by oldest is 3.5 years old so i am not really sure what i should be ordering.  did you order her yearly curriculum's on top of the journey through waldorf?

Quoting -Teeter-Totter-:


I was just about to ask you for your links and favorites regarding it :)

Right now ours are little (2 and almost 4), so we use a mash of things including a weekly waldorf rhythm and mostly play.

We love the calming gentleness of it (at least the crafts, rhythms, stories-we don't apply steiner's thoughts on it).

DH wants me to use something a little more rigorous when they get older, but I think we'll always allow that waldorfy-ness to seep into our days, we enjoy it too much-makes me feel like a kid again!  

Quoting Boobah:

Good websites:
Www.waldorfessentials.com
Www.simplicityparenting.com
Www.frontierdreams.com (blog)
Www.parentingpassageway.com

Good books:
Simplicity parenting by Kim John Payne
Beyond the rainbow bridge - can't remember the author
Seven times the sun
Heaven on earth

Good curriculum:
Journey through Waldorf (this is what I use, super inexpensive)
Christopherus
Enki
BEarth institute
Live education
Oak meadow (not strictly Waldorf, but Waldorf inspired, gentle, and slightly more academic than true Waldorf)

A good guide is the Waldorf homeschool overview by the authors of Christopherus.

I have seen several of these curric, and in my opinion, though they are all much pricier than journey through Waldorf, none of them are better, more complete, or as well laid out. :)







Boobah
by Nikki :) on Nov. 19, 2013 at 10:02 PM
Oak meadow is a little more academic, we have a copy of it as well and I like using it for the fun science and social studies projects it has on occasion. And, it is encouraged that you move at your child's pace as well. For example, if your child is in first grade and Waldorf is focusing on addition and subtraction but your child has them down easy peasy, move on! Don't hold them back in math. You just don't want to push a bunch of useless facts (useless to a 6 year old, everything has it's purpose) at an early age where they don't comprehend it.

Quoting -Teeter-Totter-:


I was just about to ask you for your links and favorites regarding it :)

Right now ours are little (2 and almost 4), so we use a mash of things including a weekly waldorf rhythm and mostly play.

We love the calming gentleness of it (at least the crafts, rhythms, stories-we don't apply steiner's thoughts on it).

DH wants me to use something a little more rigorous when they get older, but I think we'll always allow that waldorfy-ness to seep into our days, we enjoy it too much-makes me feel like a kid again!  


Quoting Boobah:

Good websites:

Www.waldorfessentials.com

Www.simplicityparenting.com

Www.frontierdreams.com (blog)

Www.parentingpassageway.com



Good books:

Simplicity parenting by Kim John Payne

Beyond the rainbow bridge - can't remember the author

Seven times the sun

Heaven on earth



Good curriculum:

Journey through Waldorf (this is what I use, super inexpensive)

Christopherus

Enki

BEarth institute

Live education

Oak meadow (not strictly Waldorf, but Waldorf inspired, gentle, and slightly more academic than true Waldorf)



A good guide is the Waldorf homeschool overview by the authors of Christopherus.



I have seen several of these curric, and in my opinion, though they are all much pricier than journey through Waldorf, none of them are better, more complete, or as well laid out. :)




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Boobah
by Nikki :) on Nov. 19, 2013 at 10:06 PM
Hi Autymsmommy, it sounds like I offended you. I apologize if I did. I will have to come back with the link on the info for you :) and just like anything else, there are exceptions! I can't go over all that Waldorf encompasses, etc here, but it's more than just gross motor and social. I cannot remember offhand but I remember reading it and nodding my head pretty hard. ;)
I, too, was an early reader and pretty academically focused at an early age. I was never good at sports, and though I am a talker around my friends and family, I have a hard time making friends, talking to groups, being in social situations, etc.


Quoting AutymsMommy:


I would be interested in your sources for this - only because I've seen the opposite (not just personally, but also in studies), stating that children who attend formal pre-k programs fare better socially and with motor skills. On a similar note, my eldest does wonderfully in sports and socially, and started reading early. My 4 year old is learning to read currently, and is quite the social butterfly, lol! I can't speak for his motor skills, because he was born with serious medical issues that have caused delays in that area.


Quoting Boobah:

I love it. My kids love love love it and are thriving. I have seen such amazing, positive changes in them, and in our whole family.

We focus on the rhythm aspect, the doing things together, celebrating the holidays, festivals, seasons. I will be honest, I haven't looked into studying steiners ideals which is what most people have an issue with. We just love the natural and art aspect of it.

As stated in the others posters reply, it does honor childhood by not forcing academics onto children so early. It has been proven that children who are pushed into academics early have deficiencies in other places (gross motor, social, etc). This may not hold true for all, but it does for many if parents really open their eyes and aren't bias. I know my oldest, who began reading just shy if her 4th birthday, has a much harder time with physical activity, is a very nervous, and worried child, and has a much harder time socially.

Though the Waldorf approach is definitely gentle, it is still a very good way of teaching children and they learn all the necessary information - they just learn it when their minds are ready for it and they can fully understand it. In fact, my Waldorf schooled daughter is ahead of her public school peers in math already (she is 8).



Sorry to write a book, I am just SO happy we found this method so early on our journey and I wish I could share it with everyone. I love that I'm able to teach my kids life skills and learn at their developing pace, incorporate art and nature with all we do, celebrate life and the seasons the way it should be. We, as a society, are so out of tune with nature and the seasons and we are paying for it.




Posted on CafeMom Mobile
Boobah
by Nikki :) on Nov. 19, 2013 at 10:11 PM
1 mom liked this
I have the early years, her kinder curric for 4/5 and 5/6, first and second grade.
Before the journey teaches you how to focus on rhythm in your home, simplifying your home, it talks about natural materials, natural open ended toys, etc. but it does it in a story form. Like it is a few different women telling their stories, almost in diary form. I personally wasn't a fan of before the journey, though her kinder curric and above is great!
For early years I highly recommend simplicity parenting, or living simply with children. I LOVED beyond the rainbow bridges and wish I could give a copy to every expecting parent. :)


Quoting tansyflower:

this is the waldorf website that i was recommended.  and yes, her prices are fantastic!  i was thinking about ordering the early years...and the jjourney through waldorf?  by oldest is 3.5 years old so i am not really sure what i should be ordering.  did you order her yearly curriculum's on top of the journey through waldorf?

Quoting -Teeter-Totter-:


I was just about to ask you for your links and favorites regarding it :)

Right now ours are little (2 and almost 4), so we use a mash of things including a weekly waldorf rhythm and mostly play.

We love the calming gentleness of it (at least the crafts, rhythms, stories-we don't apply steiner's thoughts on it).

DH wants me to use something a little more rigorous when they get older, but I think we'll always allow that waldorfy-ness to seep into our days, we enjoy it too much-makes me feel like a kid again!  


Quoting Boobah:

Good websites:

Www.waldorfessentials.com

Www.simplicityparenting.com

Www.frontierdreams.com (blog)

Www.parentingpassageway.com



Good books:

Simplicity parenting by Kim John Payne

Beyond the rainbow bridge - can't remember the author

Seven times the sun

Heaven on earth



Good curriculum:

Journey through Waldorf (this is what I use, super inexpensive)

Christopherus

Enki

BEarth institute

Live education

Oak meadow (not strictly Waldorf, but Waldorf inspired, gentle, and slightly more academic than true Waldorf)



A good guide is the Waldorf homeschool overview by the authors of Christopherus.



I have seen several of these curric, and in my opinion, though they are all much pricier than journey through Waldorf, none of them are better, more complete, or as well laid out. :)





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