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Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

How much regulation should homeschooling have?

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Poll

Question: Do you agree that homeschooling should be regulated?

Options:

Yes, there should be checks to make sure kids don't fall through the cracks.

No. I don't agree at all. I don't want the government involved in my child's education.


Only group members can vote in this poll.

Total Votes: 68

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Link to the rest of the article

His father, Clarence Powell, defends the home-school education, that Josh and his 11 siblings received, and that he has a right to educate his children anyway he sees fit without the government interfering. And in that respect, he's correct: According to Virginia state law, parents who have a religious objection, can opt to not only home-school their children but to do so without any government oversight, meaning there is no mandatory curriculum and no checks placed on the family to ensure the children are learning at an appropriate level.

by on Nov. 21, 2013 at 12:55 PM
Replies (41-50):
paganbaby
by Silver Member on Nov. 21, 2013 at 9:57 PM
4 moms liked this

I beg to differ.

I got straight Fs from 7th to 9th grade (excepting for a brief time in independent study) I didn't learn a damn thing, basics or otherwise while I was there. Ds was in the second grade and still didn't know how to read or write. He was also passed with Fs and Ds. My mom was the one who taught my sister how to read and brought her math skills up to grade level in 2nd grade. My sisters father dropped out in high school and was literally illiterate. I'm sorry but it's not guaranteed that you will get the basics in public school.

Quoting AutymsMommy:


I could. A million and ten ways. At least in public school, you WILL get the basics - like it or not. With no regulation, homeschooled children have no such guarantee.

I'm anti-regs because I do not believe in punishing the whole for the actions of a few - but I can certainly see how homeschooling has the potential to be worse than public school.

Quoting paganbaby:

I agree with you and hope like hell it doesn't happen. I can't see how homeschooling could possibly be worse than public school. I dropped out in 9th grade yet I didn't learn a thing past 6th. I ended up teaching myself as a teenager.

Quoting TidewaterClan:

It'll be pretty rough for them.

I'm not asking for government intervention, just saying if they get wind of an older child having issues, they may use it as an excuse to pound down on all of us.  It looks like 25% of public high school students fail or drop out.  I can't find stats for hs children, but I'm assuming our percentages are much lower.  It just made me cringe to think of having more regulation because the government would consider it justified.

 

Quoting paganbaby:

As bad as I feel for those kids, I wouldn't want the laws to change because of it. If nothing else they can always continue their education on their own by taking classes in college or just hitting the library.

Quoting TidewaterClan:

That is a doozy of a question!  I don't want to show the government all of the wonderful things we're accomplishing this year (though I would love to brag how much more they're learning than the did in ps - evil laugh!).  

I have been to a few local hs events and I've seen two children who definitely aren't getting the education they need to succeed.  Honestly, I hope those types don't end up causing the rest of us to go through extreme amounts of regulation in the future.







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mem82
by Platinum Member on Nov. 21, 2013 at 10:24 PM
I like how Ohio does it. End of year portfolio or testing. You have to prove your child learned 25 percent more than last year. Also, at the beginning of the year you give a curriculum outline and material list that you aren't bound to. Easy peasy plus kids have a right to be educated and I don't believe the government is out of line to do a yearly check to make sure it's happening. I see too many people irl and online that aren't teaching their children while saying they are hsing.
mem82
by Platinum Member on Nov. 21, 2013 at 10:27 PM
I basically agree with all of this.

Quoting Grumpy.Cat:

I think children's rights need to come before parent's rights. Parents can advocate for themselves. Children cannot. Their rights trump your comfort/rights.

Not in the sense of overseeing the homeschooling itself, or dictating curriculum, but I do think there should be a minimum requirement to register a child with the local authority as a homeschooler and to have a basic wellness evaluation every year.

Homeschooling is great for those of us who don't abuse kids, but it's a godsend to those who do. Abuse is often caught at schools, there's teachers and other kids and their parents around. That safety net is not there for homeschooled kids, one needs to be there in its place.

Homeschooling also has its fair share of extremists (religious and otherwise) who use it as a way to isolate and indoctrinate children. With extreme philosophies tends to come extreme parenting methods, like the sick fucks that follow those child training manuals. Without some kind of oversight or checking up on the children, bad things happen and there is NO ONE to even see it, let alone put a stop to it.

It's no fun to have someone evaluate your home and life, but I'm not selfish enough to think that just because *I'M* not doing anything wrong, that those kids whose parents are abusing them don't deserve to be checked out and taken out of bad situations. If that means putting up with an evaluation on my home, so be it.

debramommyof4
by Silver Member on Nov. 21, 2013 at 10:44 PM
See I said no. But this is the part that gets me. How can they get caught abusing their child if they have that much control. However, even in public school abuse goes unnoticed. I know since I was one of the abused that went unnoticed.

Quoting Grumpy.Cat:

I think children's rights need to come before parent's rights. Parents can advocate for themselves. Children cannot. Their rights trump your comfort/rights.

Not in the sense of overseeing the homeschooling itself, or dictating curriculum, but I do think there should be a minimum requirement to register a child with the local authority as a homeschooler and to have a basic wellness evaluation every year.

Homeschooling is great for those of us who don't abuse kids, but it's a godsend to those who do. Abuse is often caught at schools, there's teachers and other kids and their parents around. That safety net is not there for homeschooled kids, one needs to be there in its place.

Homeschooling also has its fair share of extremists (religious and otherwise) who use it as a way to isolate and indoctrinate children. With extreme philosophies tends to come extreme parenting methods, like the sick fucks that follow those child training manuals. Without some kind of oversight or checking up on the children, bad things happen and there is NO ONE to even see it, let alone put a stop to it.

It's no fun to have someone evaluate your home and life, but I'm not selfish enough to think that just because *I'M* not doing anything wrong, that those kids whose parents are abusing them don't deserve to be checked out and taken out of bad situations. If that means putting up with an evaluation on my home, so be it.

usmom3
by BJ on Nov. 21, 2013 at 10:50 PM
3 moms liked this

 I love living in Texas because there is no government involvement in our homeschool!

redhead-bedhead
by Bronze Member on Nov. 22, 2013 at 7:45 PM
3 moms liked this

I feel like with all of the failing government funded schools, they have no business telling me how to teach my children. I do feel for the son in that case though.

paganbaby
by Silver Member on Nov. 22, 2013 at 9:04 PM

My only real issue with that is, my son can't take tests. Last time we tried that he stood stock still for 15 minutes until they called my mom to come get him.

Quoting mem82:

I like how Ohio does it. End of year portfolio or testing. You have to prove your child learned 25 percent more than last year. Also, at the beginning of the year you give a curriculum outline and material list that you aren't bound to. Easy peasy plus kids have a right to be educated and I don't believe the government is out of line to do a yearly check to make sure it's happening. I see too many people irl and online that aren't teaching their children while saying they are hsing.


Lilypie - Personal pictureLilypie Breastfeeding tickers

mem82
by Platinum Member on Nov. 22, 2013 at 9:43 PM
My son doesn't test, eithe , he does the portfolio. My dd likes to test.

Quoting paganbaby:

My only real issue with that is, my son can't take tests. Last time we tried that he stood stock still for 15 minutes until they called my mom to come get him.

Quoting mem82:

I like how Ohio does it. End of year portfolio or testing. You have to prove your child learned 25 percent more than last year. Also, at the beginning of the year you give a curriculum outline and material list that you aren't bound to. Easy peasy plus kids have a right to be educated and I don't believe the government is out of line to do a yearly check to make sure it's happening. I see too many people irl and online that aren't teaching their children while saying they are hsing.


autodidact
by on Nov. 22, 2013 at 10:21 PM

are you in a charter?

it's what we're in. we have to provide work samples (this can be a PITA) but we are allotted funds a list of pre-approved vendors of classes and goods. along with this comes testing, which we don't stress about at all and he does very well at. I do like having an objective measure of his progress. 

Quoting Jinx-Troublex3:

I believe that there should be no government control or review.

That said, I love our hybrid option where the government pays for my homeschooling and I still do as I please. LOL Yes, my kids take the state test but I don't even look at the results.


Howardx5
by on Nov. 22, 2013 at 11:27 PM

Agreed


Quoting bluerooffarm:

 I completely agree with Aimee!!  I am also leery of a system that admittedly is failing in their duties to educate children yet still wishes to dictate what homeschoolers do with our children.  I also understand that homeschooling without regulation can foster an environment where it is easier for an abuser to abuse their children without interference or consequence, but abusers fall through the cracks in the government system as well. 



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